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Kisenosato intai

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Grand champion Kisenosato retires from sumo

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Grand champion Kisenosato, the only Japanese wrestler at sumo's highest rank, has decided to retire after three straight losses at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament.

Kisenosato needed a strong start to the New Year tourney to salvage his career but wasn't able to win in the first three days and decided to retire, his stablemaster said on Wednesday.

"I spoke to him for about 30 minutes yesterday," stablemaster Tagonoura said. "It was his decision. He told me he could no longer perform at the level he wanted to."

The 32-year-old Kisenosato was the first Japanese-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo's highest rank in March 2017. He won his second straight championship in his yokozuna debut at the following tournament.

But injuries prevented Kisenosato from completing a record eight straight grand sumo tournaments and he has not been able to live up to the high standards required of a grand champion.

Sumo has been dominated by foreign-born wrestlers in the past decade with Mongolian grand champions Asashoryu and Hakuho winning a majority of tournaments. The lack of Japanese wrestlers has been a cause for concern among sumo officials and some observers suggested Kisenosato was promoted prematurely to give the sport a Japanese yokozuna.

In addition to the lack of Japanese wrestlers at the top, the sport has been rocked by a series of scandals in recent years including bullying of younger wrestlers and wrestlers gambling on professional baseball games.

Last year, the Japan Sumo Association came under fire when it ordered female first responders to leave the ring as they attempted to revive a male official who collapsed at an event in northern Kyoto.

The sumo ring, or dohyo, is considered sacred in the male-only sport. Women are banned from entering it because they are seen as "ritually unclean."

Kisenosato made his professional sumo debut in March 2002 and joined the top division in 2004.

https://japantoday.com/category/sports/grand-champion-kisenosato-retires-from-sumo

 

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Sad but inevitable. Wishing him the best in his future endeavors.

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It was time to go. Ozeki Kisenosato was a very solid top-tier rikishi. The two yushos in a row definitevely made him deserve the rank of Yokozuna. He had a very high respect for the sumo, refusing yaocho and inter-ozeki gifts. In the end, due to his injury, he was a weak yokozuna, but in history did weaker yokozuna exist, undoubtedly.

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Yokozuna Kisenosato to retire after eighth straight defeat

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Yokozuna Kisenosato has decided to retire as a sumo wrestler after suffering his third loss of the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament, his stablemaster said Wednesday.

The 32-year-old, who went into the 15-day tournament at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan with his career in jeopardy, decided to close the curtain on his career after posting an 0-3 record to start the basho.

Despite saying he was “close to his ideal shape” before the tournament, Kisenosato lost to komusubi Mitakeumi on opening day. He was handed his second and third upsets by top-ranked maegashira Ichinojo and Tochiozan.

Not counting his forfeit on Day 5 of November’s Kyushu meet, Kisenosato has posted eight straight losses since September, the worst run for a yokozuna since the 15-day grand tournament format began in the summer of 1949...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/01/16/sumo/yokozuna-kisenosato-retire-eighth-straight-defeat/#.XD6KZlX7Tcs

 

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OMG finally! No more BS.

He was a great rikishi; heavy and technical, great tawara fighter, sticky left hand and with really good side movements and dohyo sense. He was also kind of a choker but lets concentrate in the good stuff...

I know i have been very critical on him but that wasen't personal...He got stuck in a situation way bigger then him with all this "Japan needs a Zuna" business. What pissed me off was all the wishful thinking about his recovery...I mean...two years ago tooked me 30 minutes on google to knows for sure that no one could perform at zuna's level with that kind of injury (with no surgery, although even with the procedure there was no full recovery guarantee)...many people here could not acept this fact and acted with great arrogance with those who knowed that Kise was doomed...well, well...I told ya Bioutches!

All the pressure on kiokay to keep the BS about Kise's career make them act (all of them; Kise himself, Oyakata, Japanese midia, Kyokai...) in a ridiculous way. Money and prestigious of the sport are important...But where is the F* hinkaku?

The deal is clear; if you don't afford to go for the big macaroon every time you are on competition you cant be Yokozuna. This code was breaked for all the hype and money that Kise was bringing to the game. Shameful. Thats why i not sorry for his intai. Very nice ozeki...BS Yokozuna. Actually im very happy because now we sumo lovers can forget that phony recovery and focus on the real stuff...

(Bow...)

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Tragic end to an otherwise illustrious career, worthy of a bio movie. Good luck and God bless him. I am sure he will have a very long and illustrious career as an oyakata, filling the hole left by Takanohana, without all the craziness and scarves. I expect you will see a very lovable, warm side to him now the pressure of having to perform on the dohyo has been lifted.

Edited by Rocks
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Bugger. 

The Kise stat for me that counts most is that he beat Hakuho 16 times during a period when Hak was at his peak. And Hak always made him earn it. They fought each other once as Makushita (Kise lost), meaning every victory occurred when Hak was either Ozeki (3) or Yokozuna (13). That speaks to how good Kise was. The only other rikishi with comparable records are Harumafuji, Asashoryu and Kotoosho. 

His sumo was relatively one dimensional and he relied heavily on just a couple of techniques (which was his downfall in the end because he couldn't adapt to the injury). But he was extremely good at what he did, making the most of his natural size and strength. His sumo was always conducted going forward. 

I always cheered for Kise, because he was always gachinko. I knew he had the ability to get to Yokozuna but I feared he would never get his head right enough to make it to the rope. It's an incredible shame that his career was finished prematurely by a poorly managed injury just when he made it. 

I'll have some sake tonight and will drink a toast to all the pleasure (and frustration) he has given me as a sumo fan. 

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By the way, it is the first "natural" (i.e. non scandal-induced) yokozuna retirement since Musashimaru in 2003.

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51 minutes ago, Morty said:

It's an incredible shame that his career was finished prematurely by a poorly managed injury just when he made it.

This is the real tragedy of it. Prompt surgery followed by a couple of basho off to recover, and he might have had another yusho or two under his tsuna by now. Instead, it's all over. It need not have been.

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50 minutes ago, Morty said:

The Kise stat for me that counts most is that he beat Hakuho 16 times during a period when Hak was at his peak ....... The only other rikishi with comparable records are Harumafuji, Asashoryu and Kotoosho. 

Up till now, only 4 rikishies beat Hakuho for 10 or more times: 

Asashoryu fought Haku 25 times, winning 12 or 48%.

Harumafuji 57 times, winning 21 or 36.8%.

Kotooshu 45 times, winning 10 or 22.2%.

Kisenosato fought Haku 60 times, winning 16 or 26.7%. Note that Kakuryu fought Hakuho 47 times, winning only 7 or 14.9%.

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It was painful to see Kise struggling basho after basho.   It's time for him to move on to better things.   

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Sad for any grand champion to end a career this way.  I have only the deepest respect for Kisenosato. All the best in the future. 

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Kisenosato made juryo when he was still 17, makuuchi when he was 18 (from which he was never demoted), and sanyaku days after turning 20 (the announcement coming when he was still a teenager). He famously ended Hakuho's 63 match winning streak in 2010.

Then his career stalled for a bit. He got pipped both for ozeki promotion and winning a yusho by Kotoshogiku, a rikishi most people (myself included) didn't think was as talented. I was a fan of "the Kid", but by the middle part of this decade I doubted he would ever win promotion to yokozuna. Of course I was wrong, and Kisenosato won consecutive yusho, and after the first was promoted to yokozuna.

Ironically, it was in winning the second yusho that he sustained the injury which lead to his intai today. It's been an ugly ending for a checkered career with many high points. I hope he has a long and successful career as an oyakata.  

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(Weeping...) Sad to hear of Kisenosatos intai.........

One of my favourites,sumo wont be  the same without him....

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A tragic end to a storied career. My hope is that the way he handled his injury will be a lesson learned for a lot of rikishi aspiring to reach the top. Sometimes you need to have that corrective surgery. The NSK would have been more than happy to let him have a couple of basho off in order for him to completely heal, instead of the debacle that we saw for the last two years. I can't be mad at Kise more than be mad at his oyakata. We have seen that many rikishi have mounted a comeback after having had the corrective surgery, Kise in hindsight should have done the same. He still is in the record books for having achieved 700 makuuchi wins, that is a major achievement. Though he could not achieve all he set out to do as a yokozuna, he still made it to the top, nobody can take that away from him. Hopefully Araiso oyakata will be able to raise many successful rikishi some day.

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What sad news to wake up to. Wishing him all the best (and especially some well deserved rest) for his future as Oyakata. One can only hope that he learned from what happened to him on how to deal with severely injured deshi.

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12 minutes ago, WAKATAKE said:

A tragic end to a storied career.

In the far future, he is going to be oft mentioned as the yokozuna who went kyujo in the last 10 of 11 bashos before his intai.    Sad, indeed.

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I feel relief at hearing he’s finally decided to accept his intai. It’s criminal how the Kyokai failed to get him the surgery he needed to have any chance at a full recovery. That’s what you get in Japan (on general) and Sumo (in specific): exceptionally myopic decisions rooted in traditional views of duty and honor. 

 

I wonder if he will find a Mrs. Kise to become an okamisan alongside him? Are there any rumors of his dating life picking up? 

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14 minutes ago, Michishige said:

I feel relief at hearing he’s finally decided to accept his intai. It’s criminal how the Kyokai failed to get him the surgery he needed to have any chance at a full recovery. That’s what you get in Japan (on general) and Sumo (in specific): exceptionally myopic decisions rooted in traditional views of duty and honor. 

 

I wonder if he will find a Mrs. Kise to become an okamisan alongside him? Are there any rumors of his dating life picking up? 

It's not the Kyokai that was responsible for having him get the surgery. That fell straight on him and his oyakata. And his oyakata failed him by not telling him to get the surgery done. Other rikishi have gone out injured, got surgery or took as long as they needed to heal. Aand while they ended up falling back to the unsalaried ranks after sitting out for a while, they've come back to the top (Tochinoshin, Chiyonokuni, Ryuden as examples). This was a bad decision by Kisenosato and Tagonoura Oyakata.

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According to today's NHK sumo broadcast, Kisenosato will assume the toshiyori (elder) name of Araiso (荒磯).

 

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2 minutes ago, Kaninoyama said:

According to today's NHK sumo broadcast, Kisenosato will assume the toshiyori (elder) name of Araiso (荒磯).

 

Apparently he's owned that kabu for about ten years.

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8 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

Apparently he's owned that kabu for about ten years. 

Here's the kabu history...the stock was once owned by Wakanohana 1's brother in law...

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Kabu.aspx?kabu=2

Goodbye Kise,.... we will always have our song...

 

17862.jpg

Edited by Akōgyokuseki
add photo of Kise
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1 hour ago, WAKATAKE said:

It's not the Kyokai that was responsible for having him get the surgery. That fell straight on him and his oyakata. And his oyakata failed him by not telling him to get the surgery done. Other rikishi have gone out injured, got surgery or took as long as they needed to heal. Aand while they ended up falling back to the unsalaried ranks after sitting out for a while, they've come back to the top (Tochinoshin, Chiyonokuni, Ryuden as examples). This was a bad decision by Kisenosato and Tagonoura Oyakata.

And as yokozuna, Kisenosato wouldn't even have had to suffer that indignity. He could have taken as long as necessary to recover after surgery without loss of rank.

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