Akinomaki

Sumo World Championships 2018

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Posted (edited)

On the 21st and 22nd in Taiwan -  a live stream announcement appeared for the seniors on the 22st (not for the juniors on the 21st) - the Asian sumo championships are at the same location on the 20th http://www.ifs-sumo.org/ifs-schedule.html

Edited by Akinomaki
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Thanks Akinomaki. If there is wifi at the stadium I will try to post videos as they happen to Facebook. I'll either make a page or put it in my Kimarite Central Sumo techniques page. 

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Posted (edited)

A truly brilliant decision to clash this with a tournament by the pros, even more so as it's taking place in nearly the same time zone this year. That's the way to build an audience for the sport. Hopefully they'll at least archive the live streams.

Edit: The linked Youtube stream now appears to be for the adult competition on Sunday.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Posted (edited)

The stream videos of the juniors men/women/individuals/teams are now on the International Sumo Federation channel - also one of the Asian championships https://www.youtube.com/user/sumo5931/videos

The live streams for the seniors on the channel are also listed on the ISF top page http://www.ifs-sumo.org/

I haven't found a result page yet

juniors

spo1807210043-n1.jpgo spo1807210043-n2.jpgo spo1807210043-n3.jpgo

Edited by Akinomaki
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Posted (edited)

Quick male juniors rundown from the stream, for those who don't want to search through it (and the results given on-screen aren't all correct)

Japan won junior men's team gold, with a trio of Daisuke Saito (Saitama Sakae third-year), Hidetora Hanada (Wakayama Commercial High School second-year), and something Kawabuchi (Kanazawa Gakuin High).  They beat Mongolia 2-1 in the final (Kawabuchi lost the third match), although the stream incorrectly lists Mongolia as finishing 1st. Two of the members of the Mongolian team I recognize from high school sumo in Japan: Temulin? (best 16 at the 2017 interhigh and best 8 at the 2018 Kanazawa tournament)  and Daraibaatoru (best 4 at the Kochi tournament).

As for individual competition, Hanada won the openweight and Saito won heavyweight. At middleweight, a Russian (who looks Mongolian) defeated a Japanese competitor (Yuki Daesei?), although the stream incorrectly lists the winner as the Japanese representative. Lightweight was won by a Hungarian given as Richard Vegh.

Perhaps predictably, many of the competitors outside the Mongolian and Japanese teams looked pretty clueless.

 

Edited by Katooshu
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Posted (edited)

Asian Sumo Championships

Men's lightweight champion: Munkhbayar Galbadrakh (Mongolia)

Men's middleweight champion: Miwa Hayato (Japan, Nittaidai grad, runner-up at the 2017 All-Japan tournament)

Men's heavyweight champion: Seira Shiroyama (Toyo 3rd-year, 2017 Kokutai champion and 2-time high school yokozuna)

Men's openweight champion: Tomohiro Saigo (Nichidai grad, 2016 Kokutai champion and 2017 amateur yokozuna)

The openweight winner is incorrectly listed on-screen as a competitor from Hong Kong. And, not to belabour a negative point, but so many of the competitors look clueless. The toughest amateur competitions in the world are by far the Japanese national ones, just vastly more depth to the competition in those.

Edited by Katooshu
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2 hours ago, Katooshu said:

and something Kawabuchi (Kanazawa Gakuin High).

Either Kazuma or Kazuki, the latter being 1 year older and currently in his final year at high school

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Posted (edited)

There were some funny mawashi in the adult world championships. A lot of them seemed pretty much like briefs and didn't appear to offer as much to grip as the mawashi we see in ozumo and Japanese amasumo.

Edited by Katooshu

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On 7/21/2018 at 16:54, Katooshu said:

Japan won junior men's team gold, with a trio of Daisuke Saito (Saitama Sakae third-year), Hidetora Hanada (Wakayama Commercial High School second-year), and something Kawabuchi (Kanazawa Gakuin High).  They beat Mongolia 2-1 in the final (Kawabuchi lost the third match), although the stream incorrectly lists Mongolia as finishing 1st. Two of the members of the Mongolian team I recognize from high school sumo in Japan: Temulin? (best 16 at the 2017 interhigh and best 8 at the 2018 Kanazawa tournament)  and Daraibaatoru (best 4 at the Kochi tournament).

The 2 Mongolians from Asahigaoka-high proudly present the runner-up certificates - Choijil-kun and Dalai-kun (right)

a000788725_02.jpg

Dalai-kun was senpou for the 1st bouts, Choijil taishou for the last ones. After all 3-0 rounds, Dalai lost to Hanada in the final and the middle man lost as well. http://www.townnews.co.jp/0607/2018/08/04/443352.html

On 6/9/2018 at 19:02, Akinomaki said:
On 12/10/2017 at 16:20, Akinomaki said:

The local paper had an article about Choijilsuren,  バドジャルガル・チョイジルスレン and another Mongolian exchange student, (e.g.) Dalaibaator, シャグダルスレン・ダライバートル. Both 2nd year at Asahigaoka high in Odawara, Kanagawa. Both want to first proceed to university and then either serve the sumo world or Mongolia.

Asahigaoka-sumo club. The 2 Mongolians are now leading it as 3rd years, but there is a problem: a team must only have up to 20% foreign exchange students in it. The Asahigaoka team has to compete with 4 members at the Kanto championships, like at the Kanagawa championships, where they finished 2nd. Dalaibaator will likely be in the team for Kanto, Choijilsuren was in it for Kanagawa, but he finished 3rd in the individuals open weight, and Dalaibaator 2nd.

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On 7/21/2018 at 16:54, Katooshu said:

male juniors

Japan won junior men's team gold, with a trio of Daisuke Saito (Saitama Sakae third-year), Hidetora Hanada (Wakayama Commercial High School second-year)

As for individual competition, Hanada won the openweight and Saito won heavyweight.

180811_hanada.jpg

http://www.nwn.jp/news/180811_hanada/

Hanada: "All were bigger than me, but I didn't lose at the tachiai and could contest" - aim: "A rikishi like Chiyonofuji, with small stature but power and perseverance." His coach: "A talent with qualities to make you think you won't ever come across such an athlete again. I want him to become the first yokozuna from Wakayama."

185cm, 125kg - started sumo in 2nd grade. His father was a national wrestling champion while in university, his mother is a judo coach. He was nominated after his win in March and the national junior training camp in April

On 3/21/2018 at 00:22, mikawa said:

第69回全国高校相撲高知大会

This is a national high school sumo tournament for First and Second Year pupils, as March is the final month in the Japanese academic year. The individual competition features 3 different weight classes - 80 kg, 100 kg, and Open Weight.

Individual Competition (Open Weight)

Winner - Hanada Hidetora (花田 秀虎), Wakayama Commercial High School (Wakayama)

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Hanada also won the national Usa high school tournament that was held on September 2nd. That is his 3rd national circuit tournament yusho of 2018--the other two being Kochi and Kanazawa.

High school yokozuna and fellow world champion Daisuke Saito was runner-up. Saito has been very consistent in 2018, making the semifinals or better at the Hirosaki tournament (1st), Kanazawa tournament (semifinals), Kanto tournament (2nd), Interhigh (1st), Towada (semfinals), and now Usa (2nd). Saito beat Naya in the Usa finals last year.

Losing semifinalists were Saitama Sakae's Ryuichi Kamiyama and Buntoku's Naoya Kusano--both former middle school yokozuna, with the latter having beaten Hanada in the 2016 middle school finals to earn that title.

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