Asashosakari

Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Nagoya 2018

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4 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

Willing to bet the farm and drive the stake that Mitakeumi will be Sekiwake East next basho, regardless of Ichinojou's KKing or not.

You could always enter GTB and bet two points on it.  B-)

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Day 14 (results, text-only results):

Yusho arasoi:

13-1 Sw Mitakeumi
12-2 ---
11-3 M9w Yutakayama, M13w Asanoyama


    3-3-8 Kakuryu       Y1   Hakuho       3-1-10
    kyujo Kisenosato    Y2
     9-5  Goeido        O1   Takayasu      9-5
                        O2   Tochinoshin  5-2-7

And it is done. Pursuer Asanoyama kept up some pressure on the leader by storming through opponent Endo's semi-henka in the middle of the makuuchi proceedings, but Mitakeumi was unfazed and calmly waited for his opportunity before he marched Tochiozan out of the dohyo to clinch his first-ever top division title. Yutakayama's victory over ozeki Tochiozan was too little too late afterwards (though still impressive). Congrats to the champion! (Yushowinner...) This marks 2018 as the first year since 2000 with more than one yusho won by rikishi ranked below ozeki. With perhaps more to come in Aki or Kyushu?

Goeido was felled by KK-seeking sekiwake Ichinojo today, so the Mongolian giant is still in position to defend his rank, which few people probably expected back when he was 3-6. That would be bad news for Tamawashi who'd be stuck at komusubi after all, although with just 8 or 9 wins it would hardly be a major injustice. Day 14 saw him defeated by a very spirited Chiyotairyu.

The bad news for Chiyotairyu is that he's out of the running for a komusubi slot himself anyway. He was going to be behind today's winner of the Ikioi-Takakeisho duel, in any case, and Takakeisho's victory in that matchup ensured that Chiyotairyu is also behind the loser, and then it became all academic with Ichinojo's 7th shiroboshi. Kaisei fell out of the race the old-fashioned way, with a loss of his own to rejuvenated Myogiryu.

     7-7  Ichinojo      S    Mitakeumi    13-1
     8-6  Tamawashi     K    Shohozan      3-11 (x)

                        M1
     8-6  Ikioi         M2
                        M3   Takakeisho    9-5
(x)  8-6  Kaisei        M4
                        M5
(x)  8-6  Endo          M6   Chiyotairyu   9-5  (x)
                        M7
                        M8
                        M9   Yutakayama   11-3

They've made the unusual decision to cancel one of the senshuraku high-ranker matchups, so it won't be the expeced sekiwake meeting between Ichinojo and Mitakeumi after all, but rather Mitakeumi against no-longer-pursuer Yutakayama and Ichinojo against Endo. It was a defensible decision at the moment of scheduling, IMHO, though it's been made to look a bit pointless by the Day 14 proceedings now. The participants of the two revised matches will be part of the traditional sanyaku soroibumi, along with ozeki Goeido and Takayasu who will conclude the basho with a more or less exciting 10th-win playoff.

Takakeisho is the presumed frontrunner for the available komusubi slot, needing only a win of his own (vs. Asanoyama) or an Ikioi loss (vs. Kaisei). I've kept Yutakayama listed as a candidate as he could still do it purely by the numbers if he defeats Mitakeumi and the higher-ranked duo lose, but it would be highly unusual to give the promotion to somebody from that far below.


Okinoumi was successful in the crucial demotion matchup with Arawashi today, so he won't be sent to juryo now, while Arawashi is in line to be dropped. He will have to win on Day 15 and hope for favourable results elsewhere to perhaps be allowed to stick around anyway. Ryuden achieved his kachikoshi against Sadanoumi, leaving nothing to chance or an unkind banzuke committee. Chiyoshoma is also secure in his top division slot after defeating Nishikigi, while Ishiura (loss to Daieisho) still has work to do on the final Sunday. Yoshikaze found a beatable opponent in Meisei at last, and although the numbers still call for another win, his very high position on the banzuke may favour him over Arawashi and Ishiura even if he ends the tournament at 1-14.

We do still need to determine how many juryo rikishi will be making the trek up - Aminishiki won for the third day in a row and now has the chance to clinch a promotable record tomorrow. Daishoho earned kachikoshi today, his 7th in a row already, and is theoretically also still in the race for a lucky promotion, what with the possibility of up to 5 maegashira ending their basho with demotable scores. In practice it's probably more likely that they'd spare one of the would-be demotees, but we'll see if it matters at all. The remaining outside candidates all lost, which meant outright makekoshi for J2-ranked Daiamami and Takagenji, while Hidenoumi dropped to 7-7.

The juryo yusho race also moved on to the final day after both leader Takanoiwa and pursuer Takanosho were again victorious.

                        M5   Yoshikaze     1-13 (1)
                        ...
(o)  4-10 Chiyoshoma    M8
                        ...
                        M12  Arawashi      4-10 (~)
                        M13
(x)  3-11 Kotoeko       M14  Okinoumi      7-7  (o)
(1)  6-8  Ishiura       M15  Ryuden        8-6  (o)
                        M16  Meisei        5-9  (x)

                        J1
(x)  6-8  Daiamami      J2   Takagenji     6-8  (x)
(o) 10-4  Kotoyuki      J3   Takanoiwa    13-1  (o)
(o) 12-2  Takanosho     J4   Aminishiki    9-5  (1)
(~)  8-6  Daishoho      J5   Hidenoumi     7-7  (x)

The relevant demotion matchups: Ishiura is going against Chiyomaru (M10e 5-9, lost four of the last five), Arawashi faces Daieisho (M7w 6-8), and Yoshikaze has a tough upper-rank match with komusubi Shohozan.

Kudos to the schedulers for their work in juryo, where they're deftly mixing-and-matching those who still have a lot riding on their sensuraku result: It's Takanoiwa vs. Kyokushuho (J6w 7-7), Takanosho vs. Tsurugisho (J7e 7-7), and Aminishiki vs. Mitoryu (J11w 7-7). And for good measure the remaining two 7-7 rikishi have been paired up as well, that's J5w Hidenoumi vs. J10w Terutsuyoshi.


Sad news for Kiribayama today; his fairly decisive kuroboshi in juryo against Chiyonoumi sent him to makekoshi, so no sekitori debut for the young Mongolian. That outcome has further opened up the lines for possible low-ranker promotions, however, so a lot of rikishi will be on the edge for senshuraku.

The Kizenryu last ditch survival quest moved on for another day, this time with victory over Seiro. Homarefuji and Churanoumi both lost, and their MKs are now getting large enough that they might even drop below the Ms1-Ms5 promotion zone for Aki, where they'd need a 7-0 or at least two tournaments to return to juryo.

Enho finished his repromotion campaign at 5-2 after he was defeated in short order by Daiseido today.

(x) kyujo Sokokurai     J10
                        J11
                        J12
(~)  5-9  Kizenryu      J13
(x)  3-11 Homarefuji    J14  Churanoumi    4-10 (x)

(o)  7-0  Hakuyozan     Ms1
     3-3  Gokushindo    Ms2  Enho          5-2  (o)
                        Ms3  Kiribayama    3-4  (x)
                        Ms4
     3-3  Jokoryu       Ms5  Akua          4-2
                        Ms6  Irodori       4-2
                        Ms7  Toyonoshima   4-2

As expected they're playing off Gokushindo and Jokoryu for one kachikoshi. Gokushindo would certainly be promoted at 4-3, while the case would be less clear-cut for Jokoryu - victories for Akua and Kizenryu could well lead to just three exchanges, with Kizenryu sticking in juryo and Jokoryu left out. Anyway, Akua serves as the required filler for the juryo torikumi and meets Churanoumi with his juryo return on the line. (I'm not quite sure why they didn't put him against Kizenryu, but the dwindling number of available opponents for all the Kise-beya rikishi may be playing a role here. Kizenryu meets J7w Azumaryu 5-9 now.)

Irodori may still have a small chance to get promoted if he wins his final match against Tamaki, and Kizenryu and Akua both lose. Toyonoshima is probably out of contention even with 5 wins + Irodori loss, as they would likely promote Akua at 4-3 instead. (Barring any sekitori retirements.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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Yeah, I wasn't sure why Toyonoshima was even being considered yesterday.  I guess that was before we knew Jokoryu was going to face Gokushindo and it was theoretically possible that they both lose.  I suppose they can still theoretically both fusenpai, but that would be farfetched. 

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Well it seems the very unlikely case of both Jokoryu and Kizenryu being in Juryo together was realized.

Edited by Tsuchinoninjin

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I don't see Aminishiki getting promoted, and I'm not even sure if he would have if he had won, as there's no demotable records beyond Meisei, Kotoeko, and Arawashi, and taking their place are Takanoiwa, Takanosho, and Kotoyuki.  By-the-numbers Yoshikaze would have been the next to go, but with extreme records they tend to be a bit lax on demotion and Ishiura is really the next one in line.  I don't think a 10-5 J4w takes the place of a 7-8 M15e with 32 maegashira on the banzuke.  Certainly not a 9-6 J4w.

As for Hakuyozan's potential placement on the next banzuke, there is a real dearth of rikishi to put near the bottom of Juryo once you get past Jokoryu, Enho, Kizenryu, and Azumaryu.  The next worst record by-the-numbers to demote is Gagamaru 7-8 J9w, then Tokushoryu, same but east side, then Seiro 6-9 J6e, Shimanoumi 7-8 J8e, then Tsurugisho 7-8 J7e, Takakaze 4-11 J1e, then Kotoeko 3-12 M14e.  Any of those being demoted to J12w is totally unreasonable.  Putting Hakuyozan there we can then give Chiyonoumi a half-rank promotion to J12e and then Gagamaru's demotion doesn't look as bad, and then we can give Mitoryu 8-7 J11w a half-rank promotion or put in Tobizaru 9-6 J13w with a slightly short promotion.

I guess another possibility would be severely underpromoting Tobizaru to J12w, but it seems more likely to me they'll just leave Hakuyozan with a fairly small promotion despite a Yusho from the top Makushita spot, given that most Makushita promotions generally just fit wherever there's room.

image.png.79fcea30d1852f399a2746fad8a7fecd.png

Jokoryu-Kizenryu is a tossup, but it's still not settled whether Kizenryu even avoids demotion, and Akua might replace him.

Edited by Gurowake
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6 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

I don't see Aminishiki getting promoted

I agree. I think considering the way they scheduled the matches on Day 15 and how they shook out that Akua is out of luck and Kizenryu is safe. So I agree there too.

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Ichinojo 8 wins, will he still be demoted to SW to make space for Mitake who will be challenging ozeki promotion?

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Probably way off base considering I've haven't recalibrated for changes they've made, but...

image.png.7f5ddc706eb9b0e867b79a5941e06c64.png

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41 minutes ago, Dapeng said:

Ichinojo 8 wins, will he still be demoted to SW to make space for Mitake who will be challenging ozeki promotion?

Recent history says no but I think there are not going to have the yusho winner appear on the west side so IMHO I would say yes, Ichinojo ends up Sw.

 

Speaking of that, except for deciding who gets Se the banzuke looks pretty easy down through M3 for GTB next time.

Edited by Rocks

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11 hours ago, Rocks said:

Speaking of that, except for deciding who gets Se the banzuke looks pretty easy down through M3 for GTB next time.

Well, does it? :-) I for one have difficulties placing Kw - Ikioi or Takakeisho? Ikioi is ranked higher but the difference is not that big (M2E-M3W) and Takakeisho has performed better overall and beat Ikioi (along with Ozekis, sekiwake and other opponents ranked higher than him - 5-2 score against M3E and above)

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It would be in true Kiz fashion if his first time staying in juryo is achieved with a 6-9 at J13.

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23 minutes ago, maorencze said:

Well, does it? :-) I for one have difficulties placing Kw - Ikioi or Takakeisho? Ikioi is ranked higher but the difference is not that big (M2E-M3W) and Takakeisho has performed better overall and beat Ikioi (along with Ozekis, sekiwake and other opponents ranked higher than him - 5-2 score against M3E and above)

Think you've explained why it should be Takakeisho.

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How does anyone figure Kizenryuu even has a chance of remaining in Juryo when a 6-9 from J13 happened only twice? Once, when they added two slots in Juryo, and once when there were 5 promotions. I don't see that happening this time. There is no extreme reason for that.

 

Edited by Kintamayama
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I also think Takakeisho will take the other Komusubi spot, deservedly so.   Going with Kinta on Kizenryu's fate.   

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5 hours ago, maorencze said:

Well, does it? :-) I for one have difficulties placing Kw - Ikioi or Takakeisho? Ikioi is ranked higher but the difference is not that big (M2E-M3W) and Takakeisho has performed better overall and beat Ikioi (along with Ozekis, sekiwake and other opponents ranked higher than him - 5-2 score against M3E and above)

Takakeisho is one rank behind with 2 more wins. There is no way they put Ikioi in instead of him.

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Day 15 (results, text-only results):

    3-3-9 Kakuryu       Y1   Hakuho       3-1-11
    kyujo Kisenosato    Y2
    10-5  Goeido        O1   Takayasu      9-6
                        O2   Tochinoshin  5-2-8

As always when the yusho is decided before senshuraku, the proceedings seemed a bit more low-key once they reached the end of the day with the high-rankers competing. But, even though it wasn't the expected matchup nor did it matter for the tournament outcome anymore, yusho winner Mitakeumi and basho surprise Yutakayama decided to tear the proverbial house down with one of the best matches we saw during the entire basho. Good job by the torikumi makers in the end, I suppose. The maegashira eventually prevailed and got to collect a big stack of kensho, adding to the kanto-sho award he was already set to receive for his excellent basho performance. Mitakeumi was also rewarded with two special prizes on top of the yusho: the shukun-sho and the gino-sho went his way, for a nice two-week pay package of ¥14,000,000 total (plus kensho winnings).

The musubi no ichiban between our two surviving ozeki turned out to be a bit of an anti-climax, as Takayasu seemed to come into the bout with either no plan at all or about three or four plans simultaneously - either way, Goeido sensed what was coming and won in short order to clinch double-digit wins in the end.

Sekiwake Ichinojo managed to secure his kachikoshi in between those two matches, doing so with a mighty shove out of nowhere that sent his opponent Endo tumbling. It remains to be seen if that means he has locked down the East slot for Aki basho (going by the last two such cases), or if the banzuke committee has come to its collective senses again and we'll see Mitakeumi make the deserved move to the East side.

On a sidenote: The results among the yokozuna and ozeki have come in such a way that all six should be occupying the same slots again next time. It's just the 23rd time the Y/O ranks will be unchanged in the 15-bout era since 1949 (395 tournaments total), and only the 7th such case when there were at least 6 Y/O on the banzuke (in 253 tournaments). If they're nuts and also leave the sekiwake unchanged again, that's only been seen three times before (all quite recently though - after Aki 2004, Nagoya 2007, and Natsu 2014).

The komusubi ranks will of course definitely see a change. Tamawashi is getting stuck at East Komusubi after all with Ichinojo getting his KK, and he lost his final bout to Tochiozan for good measure anyway (for the 11th straight time), while the West side will be repopulated following Shohozan's long-certain makekoshi. Takakeisho was in control of his own destiny here, and he left nothing to chance in his bout with Asanoyama, beating him decisively to collect the 10th win and his second promotion to komusubi. He'll hope to improve on his 5-10 debut back in January. Asanoyama isn't leaving Nagoya empty-handed either, as he was also awarded a kanto-sho prize for his late-basho role in the yusho race.

The spots just outside sanyaku should be claimed by Ikioi and Kaisei for Aki; the latter beat the former on senshuraku to put some doubt into the question of who's going to be East- and West-ranked at M1. Yutakayama might also have a slight claim, but they're likely to favour the two higher-ranked candidates due to their harder schedules.

     8-7  Ichinojo      S    Mitakeumi    13-2
     8-7  Tamawashi     K    Shohozan      3-12 (x)

                        M1
     8-7  Ikioi         M2
                        M3   Takakeisho   10-5  (o)
     9-6  Kaisei        M4
                        M5
                        M6   Chiyotairyu   9-6
                        M7
                        M8
                        M9   Yutakayama   12-3


The race for the last few slots in the maegashira ranks ended up unexpectedly neat. Long-suffering Yoshikaze managed to post a second victory on the spin (against Shohozan), which should be completely sufficient for him to retain his top division privileges for Aki, hopefully with a much better showing. Ishiura also saved himself at the eleventh hour with his win over Chiyomaru - who can be lucky that he was safe himself relatively early, as his 5-losses-in-6-days finish is going to see him very close to the bottom next time.

Those results left us with just three demotable maegashira, those being debutants Kotoeko (closing with 5 straight losses) and Meisei (with a nice 4-2 finish from 2-7), along with veteran Arawashi whose Day 15 defeat of Daieisho came a little too late. But that was just fine, as Aminishiki had failed to go to 10-5 earlier in the session and there's now no pressing need to promote anyone aside from Takanoiwa, Takanosho and Kotoyuki who had all punched their tickets days ago already. So, three exchanges it'll be here.

Arawashi was competitive against the joi as little as six months ago, so perhaps he'll manage to bounce back. I do expect Meisei to come back relatively soon; the 22-year-old was the third-youngest in makuuchi this basho and the fourth-youngest sekitori, and we've just seen with Yutakayama how quickly the young talents can make progress sometimes. It might be a different matter for Kotoeko, who should be much closer to his prime level already at 26 years of age and looked rather outclassed this basho. (On the other hand, we're overdue for another late-blooming Sadogatake rikishi...)

The aforementioned Takanoiwa and Takanosho still had to settle their yusho race, and we ended up receiving some bonus action after only Takanosho was successful in the Day 15 regulation bouts, which left both tied at 13-2, a score rarely seen for playoffs in the juryo division. Their decider went back and forth for a bit before the Mongolian veteran profited from a loss of footing by the youngster. Takanoiwa is returning to makuuchi one year after his troubles with Harumafuji took him out of action, while 23-year-old Takanosho is set to become the first top division rikishi for the current Chiganoura-oyakata, who took over the stable a little over two years ago. (His predecessor had run it for 12 years, raising former maegashira Masunoyama as his sole sekitori.)

Kotoyuki rounds out the field of promotees as mentioned; it's already his 5th promotion to the top division, one of the higher totals among currently active rikishi. (Aminishiki and Chiyonokuni also have 5, the lead is held at 6 by Kyokushuho, Tamawashi and Toyohibiki.)

                        M5   Yoshikaze     2-13 (o)
                        ...
                        M12  Arawashi      5-10 (x)
                        M13
(x)  3-12 Kotoeko       M14
(o)  7-8  Ishiura       M15
                        M16  Meisei        6-9  (x)

                        J1
                        J2
(o) 10-5  Kotoyuki      J3   Takanoiwa    13-2  (o)
(o) 13-2  Takanosho     J4   Aminishiki    9-6
     8-7  Daishoho      J5


The third definitely available promotion to juryo was earned by Jokoryu on senshuraku, who defeated Gokushindo for kachikoshi to end his two-year period in the morass of the unsalaried ranks. The last spot in the lower sekitori division is somewhat questionable, however: Akua failed to make his scoreline look promotable via loss to demotee Churanoumi in a juryo visit, and Kizenryu won (against Azumaryu) for the third time in four days to clinch the minimum record needed that could possibly see him survive.

Kintamayama does make a good point above that 4 exchanges wouldn't be that many, and lucky survival is usually more likely when there are already a lot of other rikishi going down. On the other hand, we did just see them spare Homarefuji last basho, at the expense of makushita rikishi with better records than Akua's and with only 3 other demotions. And they could well be willing to throw the poor suffering Kizenryu a bone - or perhaps even Kise-beya as a whole, which already sees Churanoumi going down (but admittedly also Jokoryu going up). Personally, I expect Akua to come back up, but I don't see it as a sure thing.

So, it'll be 23-year-olds Hakuyozan and Enho for their second go at juryo, ex-komusubi Jokoryu in career rebuilding mode at age 29, and possibly 27-year-old makushita regular Akua in what would also be his second juryo appearance. Either way, no matter who exactly gets promoted in the end, it'll be the first time in two years that nobody is making his juryo debut. That's rather disappointing considering the collection of promising young talent that the promotion zone was stocked with for Nagoya.

Churanoumi's 5th win should be good enough to keep him in the promotion zone for Aki, and I would think we'll be seeing him in juryo again before too long. Homarefuji's 3-12 is going to drop him rather deeper, however, and based on his recent trend with 5 straight MK his sekitori time might have ended altogether this weekend. The same could well be true for Sokokurai, although we'll have to see if and how his foot injury heals before we'll know his remaining level of strength. Kizenryu will probably keep trucking on and uwatenage'ing his way through upper makushita for a while longer if he does get demoted.

As a final aside, Toyonoshima won on senshuraku to finish 5-2, and he has at least a theoretical promotion claim, but unless the shimpan committee is completely dazzled by his continuing high popularity with the live audiences, there's absolutely nothing in the historical record of the last ~20 years to indicate that he should expect to be taken over both Kizenryu and Akua.

(x) kyujo Sokokurai     J10
                        J11
                        J12
(?)  6-9  Kizenryu      J13
(x)  3-12 Homarefuji    J14  Churanoumi    5-10 (x)

(o)  7-0  Hakuyozan     Ms1
(x)  3-4  Gokushindo    Ms2  Enho          5-2  (o)
                        Ms3
                        Ms4
(o)  4-3  Jokoryu       Ms5  Akua          4-3  (?)
                        Ms6  Irodori       4-3
                        Ms7  Toyonoshima   5-2

And last not least, senshuraku also saw a playoff contest for the sandanme yusho, where former top division rikishi Kagamio put his veteran skills on display again to defeat Sasakiyama. It's his third divisional yusho, following earlier ones in juryo and makushita. (I'll have to check if anyone else has ever won them in J->Ms->Sd order...)

As always, thanks for reading and discussing all the promotion and demotion (and yusho) goings-on!

Edited by Asashosakari
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And to close things out, here's how the former sekitori ended up doing in Nagoya basho.

new KK: Jokoryu, Higonojo, Chiyoarashi, Nionoumi, Takaryu, Kaonishiki

new MK: Sagatsukasa, Tochihiryu, Satoyama
 

Record   Rank   Shikona Heya Age Out
7-0 Y Ms1e Hakuyozan Takadagawa 23 1
5-2 Ms2w Enho Miyagino 23 2
kyujo Ms4e Asabenkei Takasago 29 1
4-3 Ms5e Jokoryu Kise 29 13
4-3 Ms5w Akua Tatsunami 27 3
 
kyujo Ms6e Terunofuji Isegahama 26 1
3-4 Ms7e Sagatsukasa Irumagawa 36 26
5-2 Ms7w Toyonoshima Tokitsukaze 35 11
2-5 Ms8w Kitaharima Yamahibiki 31 5
3-4 Ms9w Dewahayate Dewanoumi 29 12
4-3 Ms11w Higonojo Kise 33 25
3-4 Ms12e Tochihiryu Kasugano 31 3
6-1 Ms13e Daiseido Kise 25 4
0-2-5 Ms13w Amakaze Oguruma 27 2
3-4 Ms14e Satoyama Onoe 37 6
6-1 Ms14w Toyohibiki Sakaigawa 33 3
 
4-3 Ms16e Tokushinho Kise 34 16
4-3 Ms17e Chiyoarashi Kokonoe 27 30
5-2 Ms18e Keitenkai Onomatsu 28 35
4-3 Ms22e Nionoumi Yamahibiki 31 30
5-2 Ms22w Tenkaiho Onoe 33 13
2-5 Ms26e Yamaguchi Miyagino 29 3
 
5-2 Ms31e Fujiazuma Tamanoi 31 8
4-3 Ms38e Asahisho Tomozuna 29 7
5-2 Ms41e Chiyootori Kokonoe 25 4
3-4 Ms46w Sakigake Shibatayama 32 21
4-3 Ms47w Takaryu Kise 26 18
6-1 Ms49w Takayoshitoshi Takanohana 21 2
 
7-0 Y Sd11w Kagamio Kagamiyama 30 13
kyujo Sd13w Masunoyama Chiganoura 27 20
kyujo Sd30w Ura Kise 26 3
4-3 Sd32e Dairaido Takadagawa 38 71
5-2 Sd41e Hitenryu Tatsunami 34 41
5-2 Sd72e Yoshiazuma Tamanoi 41 23
4-3 Sd73e Kaonishiki Azumazeki 39 41


Two yusho by former sekitori, that's quite an unusual sight. (Edit: I take that back, it's actually become a near-annual event over the last decade...)

The accuracy of my comparison of Amakaze to Masunoyama a few months ago sadly seems to get confirmed more and more with each basho, and at this point I don't expect to see either of them back as sekitori, even though they're only 27 years old. Chiyootori also isn't posting the high-level records that one would expect to see from a former makuuchi rikishi on a fast-track return path from low makushita, but at least he's competing for now. Toyohibiki with a strong result, however, perhaps there's still something left in his tank.

Surprise showing for Sagatsukasa at his highest rank in four years; I doubt anyone expected him to be competing for kachikoshi on Day 14. Kitaharima, on the other hand, will be falling to his lowest rank since 2010, and at age 31 it might be too late for him to earn yet another (8th) stint in juryo.

Edited by Asashosakari
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52 minutes ago, Asashosakari said:

And last not least, senshuraku also saw a playoff contest for the sandanme yusho, where former top division rikishi Kagamio put his veteran skills on display again to defeat Sasakiyama. It's his third divisional yusho, following earlier ones in juryo and makushita. (I'll have to check if anyone else has ever won them in J->Ms->Sd order...)

I've investigated and couldn't find anyone else who did it in that peculiar reverse order (although I'm not 100% sure that I caught every shikona-change along the way...)

Next stop Jonidan Yusho?

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19 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

I've investigated and couldn't find anyone else who did it in that peculiar reverse order (although I'm not 100% sure that I caught every shikona-change along the way...)

Next stop Jonidan Yusho?

I ended up researching the other way around: sandanme yusho winners with sekitori experience. Short enough of a list to be checked manually afterwards. Indeed nobody else in there with Kagamio's pattern.

Honourable mentions to Hidenohana who was brought up in the trivia bits thread in a different context the other day (went juryo -> sandanme -> jonidan yusho), and Ofuji who went makushita -> sandanme -> jonidan yusho after his juryo stint (didn't win up there, though).


Edit: And this guy (dunno which shikona to pick), who was in juryo and then later won Sd -> Jd -> Jd yusho, the second one in jonidan at a lower rank than the first.

Edited by Asashosakari
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5 hours ago, Rocks said:

Takakeisho is one rank behind with 2 more wins. There is no way they put Ikioi in instead of him.

So we were on the same page actually! That only leaves me to solve my trouble seeding M1-M3 :-D 

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Not exactly the same page. You had trouble deciding, Rocks is very definite.

Edited by lackmaker
Grammar

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7 minutes ago, lackmaker said:

Not exactly the same page. You had trouble deciding, Rocks is very definite.

Good point! I inclined to Taka but kept Ikioi in the game, Rocks solved this for me, thanks!

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1 hour ago, maorencze said:

So we were on the same page actually! That only leaves me to solve my trouble seeding M1-M3 :-D 

For me? Ikioi and Kaisei being where they are at with a KK means they get M1e and M1w, respectively. Yutakayama did great but not enough to jump over them, but he does enough to get him M2e and Chiyotairyu at M2w. Then Endo M3. From there it gets trickier. Does Shodai stay as high as M3? Does Myogiryu jump him? Tougher to say.  But this is just all my opinion of course.

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6 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

And to close things out, here's how the former sekitori ended up doing in Nagoya basho.

...

Record   Rank   Shikona Heya Age Out

I know that it's a lot of work and I really like those lists, but is it possible to include one more column?
It would be interesting to see how many sekitori basho those rikishi had.
I for myself don't need the Heya, but if you want to keep it in the list, ok.

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8 hours ago, Feginowaka said:

I know that it's a lot of work and I really like those lists, but is it possible to include one more column?
It would be interesting to see how many sekitori basho those rikishi had.
I for myself don't need the Heya, but if you want to keep it in the list, ok.

I'll consider that. Do you have a strong preference for the total number of sekitori basho, or would it also work with the split numbers for makuuchi and juryo?

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