Akinomaki

Terunofuji's health problems

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Terunofuji beat Sandanme 1 Karatsuumi today.

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Posted (edited)

Terunofuji kachikoshi, beat Keitenkai today by kotenage.  He had a bad tachiai and was looking to lose. "At first I though 'oh..' but I'm happy my body was able to move," he said a bit later. "I'm getting better every basho and returning to my old self. i'm not thinking too much about the win-loss thing-I train a lot with these guys," he added. He still can't do all the moves in morning keiko and when he can he additionally goes to the gym to work out. He lost 8 kilos coming into this basho ( I seem to have found them) . "Dropping this far, i feel like a shin-deshi. I'm going about things as if I'm starting from zero, " he summed.

Edited by Kintamayama
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Posted (edited)

Terunofuji- Keitenkai:

 

Edited by Kintamayama
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Not bad.  He looks a lot fitter than the last basho.  Heavily taped two knees can't be good though.  Hope he finishes 6-1 and continues to go up the rank.

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He looks leaner and stonger which is nice to see and it was a cool win but gave up an inside grip way too easily yet again.

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4 minutes ago, Rainoyama said:

He looks leaner and stonger which is nice to see and it was a cool win but gave up an inside grip way too easily yet again.

He made it to ozeki by giving up the inside grip, wrapping the arms and lifting his opponent out.  It is his standard strong man tactic.

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28 minutes ago, Asojima said:

He made it to ozeki by giving up the inside grip, wrapping the arms and lifting his opponent out.  It is his standard strong man tactic.

True and it's also how he lost his ozeki rank, he destroyed his knees doing that.

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Whether or not that specifically is what destroyed his knees, it's a tactic that only works against good competition when he's in decent health, so it's not encouraging to see he hasn't altered that habit.

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There is a comon pattern with the guys that often lift their opponents. Terunofuji, Baruto and Tochinoshin. They all screwed up their knees and carrears at the same time. Still can't understand why Tochinoshin decided to start lifting all the guys last basho, including 200kg Chiyotaryu. Now injured again...

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The key thing for me is that there is a significant improvement 'in how much healthier' Terunofuji looks compared to even 2 months ago. It was painful to see how the injury and disease had taken its visual toll, but I'm encouraged by what I see. If the end result is 3 - 5 years of Juryo or low--Maegashira, then so be it, I'll be happy to watch him yo-yo the banzuke. But who knows, more may come.

13 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

 "Dropping this far, i feel like a shin-deshi. I'm going about things as if I'm starting from zero, " he summed.

Reading this quote was also so encouraging. He was extremely competitive in the early years, getting very down on himself when not achieving what he wanted. I think he has much more perspective now, and will appreciate his progress and his success more, even the little successes. Although I'm sure he will still be competitive with himself, and the fact that he has patiently gone through this comeback, which is still several months in the making, gives me massive respect for this young man. Hopefully the likes of Aminishki can guide him with the attitude needed to make things last near the top.  

Gaana, chi minii baatar 

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Posted (edited)

Terunofuji faced up and coming (Makushita in his fourth basho)  Mongolian Roga today.

 

Edited by Kintamayama
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Pretty terrible sumo by both, really. Was hard to believe that was a match between two 5-1's in makushita.

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On 17/07/2019 at 12:27, RPedro44 said:

Showing Roga some "Mongolian Love" at the end.

Roga actually would like to be introduced as russian, he spent a part of his childhood in mongolia but considere himself russian.

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On 15/07/2019 at 22:31, RPedro44 said:

There is a comon pattern with the guys that often lift their opponents. Terunofuji, Baruto and Tochinoshin. They all screwed up their knees and carrears at the same time. Still can't understand why Tochinoshin decided to start lifting all the guys last basho, including 200kg Chiyotaryu. Now injured again...

Off topic, but last basho Tochinoshin was desperate to regain his Ozeki position so naturally he would fall back to his strongest weapon. 

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23 minutes ago, dingo said:

Off topic, but last basho Tochinoshin was desperate to regain his Ozeki position so naturally he would fall back to his strongest weapon. 

For Terunofuji the question is if he will do the same once he gets to Juryo and starts finding real opponents. He might do it, but he will probably get injured again.

Although for Tochi I agree that is one of his strongest weapons, the same it was for Tero, I think there was a also a mental factor there. He just wanted to prove himself that he was recovered and still could do it, which helped his motivation. From what he showed in the past, Tero has the same mental weakness, if that can be called a weakness.

 

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When I first watched Grand Sumo two summers ago, I noticed a problem a few rikishi had (Tochinoshin, Kaisei in particular): they'd walk their opponent to the edge, but before they could yorikiri them out they'd get twisted and thrown down.  You could see their frustration!  Tochinishin's "crane lift" seems to be his way of making sure the opponent can't even touch the ground to initiate a throw.

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11 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

When I first watched Grand Sumo two summers ago, I noticed a problem a few rikishi had (Tochinoshin, Kaisei in particular): they'd walk their opponent to the edge, but before they could yorikiri them out they'd get twisted and thrown down.  You could see their frustration!  Tochinishin's "crane lift" seems to be his way of making sure the opponent can't even touch the ground to initiate a throw.

That's a technique issue though, too. Rikishi who master how to execute a yorikiri without compromising their own position rarely have that problem; Kyokutenho comes to mind. A lot of them try to rush it though rather than work their opponent to and over the tawara patiently - probably because they want to give the opponent less time to execute a counter move, but by that very decision they make it more likely that such a counter actually succeeds. FWIW, I'm not saying that one or the other approach is strictly superior, just that the rushing option naturally has added risks.

(And then for some it's probably also a stamina issue that they try to avoid protracted battles.)

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I don’t like second-guessing their styles, since they are at the top of their world and I’m just some dude in the middle of the US who has never seen a dohyo from the inside.  But, while it may be more dynamic to watch, when I see a wrestler as physical as Baruto, Tochinoshin, or Terunofuji I don’t expect a long career. I’m batting 1.000 on it; even Tochinoshin seems to be on borrowed time. Oosunaarashi was very physical in style, and was on his way down the banzuke when he...fell out. Ura? Less rough but depended on contortions to win. Different kind of rough physicality on his body. Time will tell whether Enho’s taping is short-term bumps and bruises or the start of chronic damage. The key for these guys is if they can shift strategies when their bodies start getting torn up. It’s too early to tell in Terunofuji’s case, I think. When he gets some real competition regularly at the top of makushita, if he still depends on size I think he’ll have trouble. I don’t think his body is healthy enough to muscle out some of those guys unless his technique has gotten better. Just my two pennies.

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Wait . . . did you just throw Enho in the same pot as Terunofuji? (Laughing...)

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3 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

Wait . . . did you just throw Enho in the same pot as Terunofuji? (Laughing...)

He throw on same pot of rikishis who have styles that are not good for the body and lead to injuries and short careers. Which I agree.

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Osunaarashi is the only sekitori I've seen with a more muscular upper body than lower body.

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Posted (edited)

I  humbly submit that Terunofuji looked  bad in all his bouts. I think he has no chance whatsoever to get another kachikoshi at this stage, the way he is looking and fighting at present. (Note to self: cut and keep for future reference)

Edited by Kintamayama
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