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Asashosakari

2018 East Japan University Championship

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Asashosakari    10,994
Posted (edited)

The 97th edition of the East Japan University Championship took place today, as always at the Kokugikan, and the winner is...Toyo University's Masahito Shiroishi, beating his schoolmate Seira Shiroyama with hikiotoshi in the final. The semifinals saw appearances by Daisuke Tanaka of Chuo University, who lost to Shiroishi by oshidashi, and Nippon Sport Science's Delgerbayar, defeated by Shiroyama via yoritaoshi.

I'll leave the rest of the individual competition in the hands of more informed members. :-)

Edited by Asashosakari
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Asashosakari    10,994
Posted (edited)

The team results, via the Nihon Sumo Renmei.


Class C

Quarterfinals

Nippon Medical bye
Tokyo Medical 4-1 Hokkaido
Kokugakuin bye
Tohoku 4-1 Jikei Medical

Semifinals

Tokyo Medical 4-1 Nippon Medical
Tohoku 3-2 (?) Kokugakuin

Final

Tokyo Medical 4-1 Tohoku

The second semifinal result is guesswork, as the Federation's posting for that round is completely messed up: It actually reads "Tokyo Medical 3-2 Kokugakuin" (yes, apparently Tokyo Medical participated in both semifinals...), and the rikishi listed for the winning team are those of Jikei Medical, who were actually eliminated in the previous round. And for good measure they also reversed the last two matches by mistake, putting the wrong participants on the left- and right-hand sides (and they've possibly mixed up who won and who lost those matches, too).

Hokkaido University were a new participating team compared to last year, while Chiba University did not attend this time.

Anyway, the four semifinalists joined the Class B competition.


Class B

Last 12

Hosei bye
Tokyo 5-0 Tohoku
Daito Bunka bye
Keio 5-0 Nippon Medical
Meiji bye
National Defense 3-2 Tokyo Medical
Senshu bye
Rikkyo 5-0 Kokugakuin

Quarterfinals

Hosei 5-0 Tokyo
Keio 3-2 Daito Bunka
Meiji 5-0 National Defense
Senshu 5-0 Rikkyo

Semifinals

Hosei 5-0 Keio
Meiji 3-2 Senshu

Final

Hosei 3-2 Meiji

Apparently the Last 12 results also serve as a promotion/relegation mechanism. Rikkyo was the sole Class C qualifier to win their Class B prelim last year, and competed as a permanent Class B member this year, while their losing opponent Nippon Medical had to start in Class C this time. So, no promotions and demotions this year, I suppose, since the Class B incumbents ran the table against the four qualifier teams.

Daito Bunka loses its seeded Class B position to Keio for 2019. (They had only gained it last year, at Keio's expense as it happens.)

The four semifinalists joined the Class A competition.


Class A

            Teams                                     Preliminary Opponents
Seeded:     Chuo, Nihon, Nihon Taiiku, Toyo                      1x Unseeded, 2x Qualifiers
Unseeded:   Komazawa, Takushoku, Tokyo Nogyo, Waseda  1x Seeded, 1x Unseeded, 1x Qualifiers
Qualifiers: Hosei, Keio, Meiji, Senshu                2x Seeded, 1x Unseeded


Preliminary Round 1

Takushoku 3-2 Komazawa
Tokyo Nogyo 3-2 Waseda
Chuo 4-1 Senshu
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Keio
Toyo 5-0 Hosei
Nihon 4-1 Meiji

Preliminary Round 2

Takushoku 5-0 Senshu
Tokyo Nogyo 4-1 Keio
Chuo 4-1 Hosei
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Meiji
Toyo 3-2 Komazawa
Nihon 4-1 Waseda

Preliminary Round 3

Takushoku 4-1 Chuo *
Nihon Taiiku 4-1 Tokyo Nogyo
Komazawa 5-0 Hosei
Meiji 3-2 Waseda *
Toyo 5-0 Senshu
Nihon 5-0 Keio

* = match won by the lower-bracket team


Standings:

 1 Nihon Taiiku  3-0, 14-1
 2 Nihon         3-0, 13-2
 2 Toyo          3-0, 13-2
 4 Takushoku     3-0, 12-3
 5 Chuo          2-1,  9-6
 6 Tokyo Nogyo   2-1,  8-7
 7 Komazawa      1-2,  9-6
 8 Meiji         1-2,  4-11
 9 Waseda        0-3,  5-10
10 Hosei         0-3,  1-14
10 Keio          0-3,  1-14
10 Senshu        0-3,  1-14

These league results also appear to be used for promotion and relegation. Komazawa and Waseda made it to the top 8 as qualifier teams last time and moved up to the Class A unseeded bracket for this year, while Hosei and Meiji were in the bottom 4 in 2017 and got dropped to Class B. Meiji has earned the re-promotion this year, Waseda goes back to Class B for 2019. The up/down decision came down to the very last bout in the head-to-head match by these two teams in round 3.

(Sidenote: The four relegated teams will be the ones to receive the first-round byes in Class B, so they're protected from dropping straight through to Class C, as unlikely as that scenario would be anyway, considering the clear strength differences between all the competing teams.)

Chuo was already the weakest seeded team last year (with the same score of 2-1, 9-6), but narrowly hung on to their seeding with a 3-2 in the quarterfinal of the knockout rounds afterwards. Have they done it again?


Quarterfinals

Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Meiji
Takushoku 3-2 Chuo
Nihon 3-2 Komazawa
Toyo 5-0 Tokyo Nogyo

Semifinals

Takushoku 3-2 Nihon Taiiku
Toyo 3-2 Nihon

Final

Toyo 4-1 Takushoku

Successful title defense for Toyo University for their second championship in this event. The final was a step too far for surprise package Takushoku University, who won three last-match deciders (prelim #1, quarters, semis) en route. They'll still get to enter next year's tournament as seeds, replacing Chuo University.

Somewhat surprisingly their phenom Seira Shiroyama was responsible for two of Toyo's five losses during the competition.


While I was checking into the promotion/demotion stuff I ended up collecting the 2016 team results as a by-product - I don't want to bump a two-year-old tournament thread (makes them harder to find afterwards when they're not at the expected date in the thread list), so here they go in a spoiler section. The 2017 results can already be found in last year's thread.

 


2016 results

Class C

Quarterfinals

Kokugakuin 2-2 Chiba

Chiba only had four rikishi available, Kokugakuin even only three (thus receiving one fusenpai as part of that 2-2). Chiba won the necessary tie-breaker bout to advance.

Semifinals

National Defense def. ???
Tokyo Medical def. ???

Final

National Defense 3-2 Tokyo Medical

The losing semifinalists were Chiba and apparently Nippon Medical, not sure in which match order and by which scores as the Federation failed to post that round's results altogether. (My guess is that the sole quarterfinal match was in the last spot in the bracket, making winner Chiba the opponent for Tokyo Medical.)

Jikei Medical wasn't a participant here, but joined the competition for 2017.

The four semifinalists joined the Class B competition.


Class B

Last 12

Hosei bye
Daito Bunka 5-0 Tokyo Medical
Keio bye
Tokyo 5-0 Chiba
Komazawa bye
National Defense 3-2 Rikkyo *
Waseda bye
Nippon Medical 3-2 Tohoku *

* = match won by the Class C qualifier team

Quarterfinals

Hosei 3-2 Daito Bunka
Keio 5-0 Tokyo
Komazawa 5-0 National Defense
Waseda 5-0 Nippon Medical

Semifinals

Hosei 3-2 Keio
Komazawa 3-2 Waseda

Final

Komazawa 3-2 Hosei

Rikkyo University and Tohoku University were demoted to Class C for 2017, the teams of the National Defense Academy and Nippon Medical School moved up to Class B.

The four semifinalists joined the Class A competition.


Class A

            Teams                                   Preliminary Opponents
Seeded:     Chuo, Nihon, Nihon Taiiku, Tokyo Nogyo             1x Unseeded, 2x Qualifiers
Unseeded:   Meiji, Senshu, Takushoku, Toyo          1x Seeded, 1x Unseeded, 1x Qualifiers
Qualifiers: Hosei, Keio, Komazawa, Waseda           2x Seeded, 1x Unseeded


Preliminary Round 1

Takushoku 3-2 Meiji
Toyo 4-1 Senshu
Tokyo Nogyo 5-0 Keio
Chuo 5-0 Waseda
Nihon 5-0 Hosei
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Komazawa

Preliminary Round 2

Takushoku 5-0 Keio
Toyo 4-1 Waseda
Tokyo Nogyo 5-0 Hosei
Chuo 4-1 Komazawa
Nihon 5-0 Meiji
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Senshu

Preliminary Round 3

Tokyo Nogyo 3-2 Takushoku
Toyo 5-0 Chuo *
Meiji 3-2 Komazawa
Hosei 3-2 Senshu *
Nihon 5-0 Keio
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Waseda

* = match won by the lower-bracket team
 

Standings:

 1 Nihon         3-0, 15-0
 1 Nihon Taiiku  3-0, 15-0
 3 Tokyo Nogyo   3-0, 13-2
 3 Toyo          3-0, 13-2
 5 Takushoku     2-1, 10-5
 6 Chuo          2-1,  9-6
 7 Meiji         1-2,  5-10
 8 Hosei         1-2,  3-12
 9 Komazawa      0-3,  3-12
 9 Senshu        0-3,  3-12
11 Waseda        0-3,  1-14
12 Keio          0-3,  0-15

Interesting to see that Toyo wasn't even a seeded team yet two years ago. (And Chuo once again with 2-1, 9-6...)

Senshu University dropped to Class B for 2017, Hosei University earned promotion to Class A.


Quarterfinals

Nihon 5-0 Hosei
Toyo 4-1 Takushoku
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Meiji
Chuo 3-2 Tokyo Nogyo

Semifinals

Nihon 4-1 Toyo
Nihon Taiiku 5-0 Chuo

Final

Nihon Taiiku 3-2 Nihon

This was Nippon Sport Science University's 6th title in this competition, winning again after two years.

Toyo University became a seeded team after this for 2017, Tokyo Nogyo lost its seed status. (And then the next year they lost again 3-2 to Chuo in the quarters to fail to regain it.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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Gurowake    1,638

I sense a pattern that no one seems to care about Class C. 

Reminds me that my high school my freshman year played in the state finals for soccer with over a foot of snow on the ground - it didn't help that we played on the west side of the Michigan and probably had increased snow from lake effects.  We were in the smallest group of schools (there was no promotion/relegation, just based on number of students), class D.  The class A finals, closer to Detroit (the east side of the state), were postponed due to far less snow. 

If you're wondering how you play soccer with over a foot of snow on the ground, you don't.  You play a game with the same theoretical rules, but it's not really the same game.  Only game we lost that season.

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Katooshu    545
Posted (edited)

That's the second straight title for the tricky push and slap-down specialist Masahito Shiroishi, as he won the Wakayama College+Corporate tournament a few weeks ago, beating Shiroyama in the finals that time as well (by okuridashi after a blatant henka, Shiroyama was also henka'd in the semis by his teammate Nakashima). Shiroishi also got to the semifinals at the Kyushu College+Corporate tournament, and looks to have made the move from probably lower top 10 collegiate rikishi to the uppermost elite. He was also a very good high schooler, winning the 2014 junior Kokutai, making the inter-high finals twice (including as a 1st year), and the inter-high semis once. Incidentally, it was Shiroyama who beat him in the finals of the 2014 inter-high

Although Seira Shiroyama, arguably the top competitor in university sumo last year, 'only' has 1 title to his name in 2018, he's made the semifinals or better at 4 of 5 tournaments (1 win, 2 runner-ups, 1 semifinal),  and has shown excellent consistency. Most of his losses I've seen come when he is sidestepped and his opponent uses greater agility, and Shiroishi is just the type who can do that effectively, so Shiroyama may continue to struggle if they keep meeting up in the final rounds. Still, for me Shiroyama is the collegiate rikishi who I'm most eagerly watching with respect to a later ozumo career. He will turn pro I believe and seems a sure-thing sekitori.

Daisuke Tanaka is Shiroyama's old high school rival, finishing runner-up to him in at least 3 national high school tournaments. He is a huge guy but he's not just about size, as the quality of his sumo is good and he's fairly well-rounded--just not quite up there with the very very best of his collegiate competitors.Mongolia's  Dergerbayar was best 4 at last year's National Student Championships and has a quarterfinal finish and two semi-final finishes to his name this year. He is definitely NSSU's top man right now and I think probably the best 2nd year at the moment. He comes from a wrestling background and has only done sumo a couple years, which is sometimes apparent in his clumsy technique--particularly a tendency to turn to the side too much and nearly give up his back. He is one of those guys who just seems to find a way to get  out of rough spots and win , though he's struggled to do that vs his semifinals conqueror Shiroyama, who has won all their meetings I know of. He plans to turn pro and has even said he'd leave college if a spot opened for him.

Toyo simply has too much depth for the other teams, with pretty much all their regular starters being among the biggest names on the college scene. It will be interesting to see how they fare in the coming few years though, as I'm not sure they have nearly the same standout talent in the lower years. Good performance by Takushoku, who also won a tournament last month and have earned a spot so far among the top teams. NSSU has made at least 3 semi-finals this year but just can't seem to break through to a final, while the famous Nihon sumo club has produced 2 individual runner-ups and a team runner-up, but is yet to grab any title other than in the East Japan 1st-year only individual competition.

Edited by Katooshu
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Katooshu    545
Posted (edited)

Individual Final:

Masahito Shiroishi (Toyo) vs Seira Shiroyama (Toyo)

Individual Semifinals:

Daisuke Tanaka (Chuo) vs Masahito Shiroishi (Toyo)

Seira Shiroyama (Toyo) vs Delgerbayar (Nippon Sports Science University)

 

Team Final

Takushoku University vs Toyo University

 

Team Semis

Nippon Sports Science University vs Takushoku University

Nihon University vs Toyo University

 

Edited by Katooshu
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Gurowake    1,638

So I take it that Nippon Sports Science is "Nihon Taiiku" in Asashosakari's breakdown, given that would be the "normal" reading of the kanji 日本体育 that's in the Japanese name according to Wikipedia.

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Asashosakari    10,994
10 hours ago, Gurowake said:

So I take it that Nippon Sports Science is "Nihon Taiiku" in Asashosakari's breakdown, given that would be the "normal" reading of the kanji 日本体育 that's in the Japanese name according to Wikipedia.

Yes. I should probably get in line with the major posters in this section and switch to the English-language names for several schools, but I prefer Nihon Taiiku / Tokyo Nogyo / Kyushu Joho etc. for their brevity when posting results...

Maybe a name key for the various jp/en names would be useful. Primarily for the universities, but there are some frequent name components at the high school level as well which could use explanation because they tend to appear in different versions here on the forum (e.g. "Norin" = Agriculture and Forestry, another one I'm loathe to type out). I've been thinking about creating that for a while, but the urge to actually do it hasn't been there yet.

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