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jranderson222

What does Takakeisho mean?

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Hello— my two boys are obsessed with sumo (like their dad!) and their favorite rikishi is Takakeisho. I know many rikishi have names that can be translated to something else. Can anyone advise as to what Takakeisho translates to?

Thank you for any help!

all my best,

josh 

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Atenzan    758
5 minutes ago, wys said:

Hi Josh,

"The Great Round One"? He's my favorite too and the Wikipedia page here, if it is accurate, contains the answer you are looking for:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takakeishō_Mitsunobu

Unfortunately that's not even close... Where did you get that from? 

Taka= precious, kei=scenery, shou=victory. 

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Bumpkin    356

Didn't we just have this? Takakeisho means, "winning in the shadow of Takanohana."

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Thank you! I’ve seen this. Please excuse my ignorance about the language, but Is it correct, then, that there isn’t a translation akin to “wondrous mountain” or “wide river” etc.?

This is from wikipedia:

“The first character in his shikona comes from the first character in the shikona of his stablemaster Takanohana, and the second two characters are taken from the given name of the Japanese historical figure Kagekatsu Uesugi.[5]

 

thank you again,

josh

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wys    28
8 minutes ago, McBugger said:

Unfortunately that's not even close... Where did you get that from? 

Taka= precious, kei=scenery, shou=victory. 

If you're asking about "The Great Round One", it came from a combination of my humor and visual inspection. If you're asking about the content of the Wikipedia page, you might want to reach out to the authors. It appears they linked to this page as their reference:

http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/news/2016/11/28/kiji/K20161128013807910.html

Unfortunately, I can't read kanji and I am skeptical about my browser's English translation.

Cheers,

Edited by wys

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Atenzan    758
4 minutes ago, Bumpkin said:

Didn't we just have this? Takakeisho means, "winning in the shadow of Takanohana."

But of course! How could I have forgotten..  

In all seriousness the kanji for his 'kei' 景 three lines on the right side short of a shadow 影 

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Atenzan    758
2 minutes ago, wys said:

If you're asking about "The Great Round One", it came from a combination of my humor and visual inspection.

Doh! I blame sleeplessness. 

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21 minutes ago, McBugger said:

Unfortunately that's not even close... Where did you get that from? 

Taka= precious, kei=scenery, shou=victory. 

This is what I was hoping for!!! Thank you!!

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Fukurou    449
4 minutes ago, jranderson222 said:

Thank you! I’ve seen this. Please excuse my ignorance about the language, but Is it correct, then, that there isn’t a translation akin to “wondrous mountain” or “wide river” etc.?

This is from wikipedia:

“The first character in his shikona comes from the first character in the shikona of his stablemaster Takanohana, and the second two characters are taken from the given name of the Japanese historical figure Kagekatsu Uesugi.[5]

With shikona meanings you would want to check the meaning(s) of the individual characters used, not just how they are pronounced. In the shikona change thread you'll sometimes see rikishi changing 1 character in their shikona to change the meaning (but not necessarily the pronunciation) of their ring name.

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Gurowake    1,719

Other information: Takakeisho's real given name is Takanobu, with the same kanji for Taka.  His shikona's "given name" replaces it with Mitsu (光); Mitsunobu and Takanobu are both common given names for males.

Wikipedia cites http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/news/2016/11/28/kiji/K20161128013807910.html that the last two kanji of his shikona come from Uesugi Kagekatsu, both of the kanji (景勝) being pronounced in his shikona according to the imported Chinese ways of pronouncing them instead of the Japanese native pronunciations for the concepts they represent.  My Japanese isn't good enough to extract what the article actually says about it without a inline translation web extension, and Rikaichan was obsoleted when Firefox updated yesterday (I'm working on getting another installed).

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Bumpkin    356
8 minutes ago, just_some_guy said:

I'm disappointed. Was hoping it meant "bowling ball."

That's "Onosho!"

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