Asashosakari

Double-checking the Sumo DB's names of foreign rikishi - other countries

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Asashosakari    8,528

Part 2 with the hodge-podge of foreign rikishi originating from countries other than the US and Mongolia. For the most part I'm only going to mention those rikishi for whom I have something reasonably useful to add; the rest are either guys whose data looks correct or who are so obscure that I have nothing. But I'm going to add links to the DB's country overviews, so feel free to take a look yourself, maybe you've got something I don't have.

Relevant umbrella reference: Wikipedia's list of non-Japanese rikishi.
 

Argentina (2 rikishi)

Hoshiandesu - the accent on "José" might be worth adding.

Hoshitango - naturalized in October 2000 while active per ja.wiki (don't know the exact date), real name adopted as 星 誕期 HOSHI Tango.


Brazil (16)

Hakusan - A 1978 newspaper article from Texas makes passing reference to him and gives the name as Pasquale BOSCHE, so reversed order from the DB and spelled a bit differently. I noticed that Wikipedia already gives that spelling. Anyone remember the source?

Azumakaze - Wikipedia has opted for a different name order, as Tuzatto Giuliano KOCHINDA. No idea which one is right,  nor if the transcribed name parts are spelled correctly.

Kuniazuma - I think his names are reversed (should be RAMOS as surname); in addition the Kyokai has his given name as Vander and so does the guy himself, assuming this is a real Facebook account. So, Vander RAMOS probably.

Ryuko - Wikipedia has his given name(s) as "Luis Go", A 2005 article by the New York Times has him as Luiz Go IKEMORI - I'm not sure which spelling to trust, but I think the presence of a second Western given name should be reflected. Has a ja.wiki article which mentions that he was naturalized on 1996/04/22 (same day as Akebono) and has been just IKEMORI Go since then.

Takaazuma - Wikipedia has "Christiano Luis" rather than "Cristiano Luiz". Can't find anything firm either way, but I do think the DB is wrong in treating "Luiz" as part of the surname; I think that's just DE SOUZA. The Kyokai no longer has his real name listed on the English side (a lot of these seem to have disappeared in the site changes of the last few years) - I assume the DB's spelling originated from there, but I'm not sure theirs was correct. In general, my impression is that the Kyokai's online katakana name transcriptions were less trustworthy before 2006 or so.

Masuyama (Brazilian origin, JP shusshin) - I'm not positive, but SOUSA is probably part of the surname.


Canada (2)

Kototenzan - became much more famous after sumo, of course; might be worth expanding to his full name John Anthony TENTA Jr., per Wikipedia.

Homarenishiki - not sure if it was typo'ed in the DB or if the Kyokai fixed the spelling later, but I think the first name should be Brodik as given by the Kyokai now,  not "Brodick".


China (12) - I'm relying on the extensive Wiktionary hanzi data for these, and assuming pinyin style romanization. Most of these are just housekeeping fixes, confirming readings or making small spelling changes. I would really prefer if somebody who actually knows the Chinese language could re-check these!

Kiyonohana - ZHANG Lihua (no space)

Kaiho - PAN Yi should be correct.

Takao - WANG Yu (not Wan)

Kanoyama - possibly YE as the surname - the hanzi 叶 has two derivations and two readings, but the name reading appears to be YE and not XIE (neither the traditional nor the simplied form appears at the latter link). Unless there's a source that specifically confirms a variant reading for this guy? The first hanzi of the given name also has two readings, so no idea if it should be Chengyue or Shengyue (but in any case, it should not have a space).

Kotoo - WANG Shidong (no space)

Nakanokuni - I've always wondered, where did the Japanized(?) "Ro Cho" alternative reading come from? I don't believe he had any connection to Japan prior to coming over as an adult, did he? LU Chao should be correct.

Sokokurai - We already fixed his name reading to Enkhtuvshin a while ago, but the Japanese name field still has the Kyokai's clumsy attempt of 恩和とう布新, with a replaced character due to encoding limitations. The Chinese Wikipedia says that the middle character should be 图. I think that's in Unicode, so no need to stick with the hiragana replacement.

Kosei - GAO Shiqiang (no space)

Chiyohakuryu - Do we have any non-Kyokai source for his name reading? "HAKU Koto" for 白 光斗 sounds like a Japanese reinterpretation to me, not like a Chinese or (Inner) Mongolian name. Actually, 白 光斗 itself doesn't look very much like a Chinese name, though I guess it's probably a character transcription of a Mongolian name (like Sokokurai's).  Anyone have insights here?

Ryutei - LI Weifu (no space)


Egypt (1)

Osunaarashi - I suspect what the Kyokai put in his real name field is not quite accurate, but I've seen "Sharan", "Shalan", "Shalaan", and probably even more versions since he debuted, to say nothing about the other parts of his name. Is there somebody who has some definite info? (John?) I realize that transcribing names originally in Arabic is a bit tricky.


Georgia as Gruzia and as Jōjia (4 total)

The four Georgians are a good example of what a mess the Kyokai's "official" data can be - the first three were listed as Surname Givenname (both JP and EN pages), but Tochinoshin was then listed as Givenname Surname (also both JP and EN). Anyway...

Gagamaru - names reversed, should be Teimuraz JUGHELI. Easily confirmed with a Google search showing Teimuraz as a very common given name and Jugheli as a reasonably common surname.


Korea (16)

Kasugao - the given name was fixed by the Kyokai at some
point to read Sung Tak.

Kaihakuzan - the Kyokai has BAEK Yoongi now.

I suspect the whole issue of Korean name romanizations needs further attention (e.g. Kasugao's looks like it might actually have to be Seong Taek by "proper" romanization), but that's way out of my depth, so I've only mentioned where the Kyokai has seemingly revised their own readings at some point, because these look to be superior to what's currently on the DB.

Three further Korean areas of interest:

Koraiyama and Nankaiyama - both recruited in the same year by the same stable, but one has his name transcribed with a Korean reading and the other with a Japanese one, even though both look pretty Korean in structure. I suppose it's possible given the convoluted history of the early and middle 20th century, but is that accurate?

Ozora - I don't know what to make of this: the Kyokai now lists his real name as OZORA Juei, rather than the previously listed SHIMODA Juei (which is also on the DB). The shikona was adopted in 2015.09, and the apparent (second) real name change took place at (or around) the same time - the rikishi directory with 2014.11 data still had him as Shimoda, the one with 2015.11 data says Ozora. Still, this seems like a weird thing to have happened.

Yamada - Wikipedia lists a Korean name "YU Sonyon" - I don't know where that was sourced, anyone?


Philippines (4)

Kotokuzan (Filipino origin, JP shusshin) - Wikipedia reminded me that Filipino newspapers have given his full name as Jasper Kenneth ARBOLADURA TERAI - I'm correct to assume that Arboladura is a surname, right?


Russia (6) - Languages based on the Cyrillic alphabet are not exactly my forte, so other opinions very welcome.

Roho and Hakurozan - I think a better transcription of their middle name would be Feliksovich, which seems more accepted and is also what the Kyokai lists. (Not sure if the DB's -sevich originated there or elsewhere.)

Wakanoho - Possibly better Aleksandrovich. Certainly -vich is more common than -vitch, not sure if -ks- is preferred over -x-. The Kyokai has the -ks-vich version.


Sri Lanka (1)

Tochitaikai - Wikipedia gives his name as "Sri Aminda de Perera" - I don't know which parts of that are the surname (just DE PERERA oder AMINDA DE PERERA?), and while I also don't know if it's actually correct, that reading looks a lot more plausible than the DB's current version.


Taiwan (11)

Ohayama - same issue as with Kanoyama among the Chinese rikishi. This guy has the non-simplified version 葉 of the same kanji, and in this case there really doesn't seem to be a way that this could possibly be read XIE. Should probably be changed to YE, unless somebody has superior insight.

Other than that I don't know enough about how Taiwanese name readings might possibly differ from "standard" Chinese, so it would be best if somebody else checked out the 11 rikishi entries.


Tonga (8)

Fukunoshima - full name Tonga 'Uli'uli FIFITA, per Wikipedia. (Not sure though if the two apostrophes should be included in the DB name entry, or if Uliuli would be sufficient.)

 

Hidenoshima - Doesn't anybody have anything more than "Shioeri"?

Sachinoshima - his surname was already added a while ago, but might be worth also listing his middle name Havea, per Wikipedia.

Tomonoshima - Wikipedia gives his name as Viri Manulea FIFITA (rather than the DB's Manurea transcription).

Yashinoshima - Wikipedia gives his name as Moleni Fe'aomoeata TAUKI'UVEA, no idea about the source.

Minaminoshima the father - full name Tevita Vaiola FALEVAI, per a Kyodo/Japan Times article from 2015. (Note, Tevita rather than Tebita.)

Minaminoshima the son - names are in the wrong order, should be Minaminoshima Isamu FALEVAI.

(By the way, apparently the father later competed in at least one early sumo world championship?! Bronze medal in the 1996 open weight according to that page, must have been 41 at the time.)

Aotsurugi - debuted at the same time as Minami the son, so his name listing at the Kyokai probably follows the same structure. I think that means his name should be listed as Tevita Ratu TAUFA. Based on Minami the father I'm assuming that the proper spelling of that Tongan name is Tevita, not Tebita. In addition, I'm suggesting Ratu instead of Rato because the printed rikishi directories give his name as ラトゥ, not ラトウ. (That would need to be corrected for his Japanese entry as well.) Also, should his naturalized given name be adjusted to "Tevita" as well? 


Western Samoa (2)

Nankairyu - the correct name appears to be Kilifi SAPA. Referred to as such occasionally in the Hawaiian newspapers of the time, and a Guam newspaper has some 2015/16 articles with somewhat unsavory news for someone of that name (and the age matches).

Nanyozakura - no luck finding anything about him. Wikipedia has his given name as Faaleva, but I don't know the source for that.
 

Nothing to note by me, but might be worth a look anyway:

Bulgaria (3)
Czech Republic (1)
Great Britain (1)
Hong Kong (1)
Hungary (1)
Indonesia (1) 
Kazakhstan (1)
Paraguay (1)
 

Edited by Asashosakari
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Asojima    1,696

In China,
Kanoyama should be Xie Shengyue.  Xie is the traditional reading for the surname character.  When the simplified characters were introduced, it became used for another character for Ye.  Sheng is the common reading, but cheng is also used.

Chiyohakuryu's name would be Bai Guangdou in Chinese.  Bai is used as a surname, so this is possibly a Chinese name.  The Chinese/Inner Mongolian conundrum probably makes it worth further checks.

I agree with your other assumptions.

Second thoughts on Kanoyama.

After looking at his birth date, I think I agree with you that the surname is most likely Ye rather than Xie.  Ye is a more common surname, and the simplified character set had become commonly used by 1976.

Edited by Asojima
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The Tongan names should absolutely include the fakauʻa,  which isn't actually an apostrophe.  It's an odd unicode code point (0x02BB) for the polynesian languages.  (I assume that the DB can handle unicode, otherwise open quote can be substituted.  Apostrophes often turn up because they're easy to type, but are technically wrong.) 

It's considered a letter in the various polynesian languages, so leaving it out is not great.  (Ditto for the Hawaiʻian names in the US thread.)
___
For the Sri Lankan rikishi, likely only the last part (de Perera) is the surname.  Sri Lankans tote up large numbers of middle names--there's a cricketer with six or seven on the scorecard.  

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Asashosakari    8,528
6 minutes ago, Ryoshishokunin said:

The Tongan names should absolutely include the fakauʻa,  which isn't actually an apostrophe.  It's an odd unicode code point (0x02BB) for the polynesian languages.  (I assume that the DB can handle unicode, otherwise open quote can be substituted.  Apostrophes often turn up because they're easy to type, but are technically wrong.) 

It's considered a letter in the various polynesian languages, so leaving it out is not great.  (Ditto for the Hawaiʻian names in the US thread.)

Thanks, that's totally uncharted territory for me. If you have anything specific about the Hawaiian names, please feel free to make corrections in the other thread. I haven't left anything out, the names there are simply as I've found them (i.e. the press likely simplified the spellings to start with).

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Asashosakari    8,528
3 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Brazil 

Ryuko - Wikipedia has his given name(s) as "Luis Go", A 2005 article by the New York Times has him as Luiz Go IKEMORI - I'm not sure which spelling to trust, but I think the presence of a second Western given name should be reflected. Has a ja.wiki article which mentions that he was naturalized on 1996/04/22 (same day as Akebono) and has been just IKEMORI Go since then.

Just noticed that the NYT article has another one:

Wakaazuma - full name apparently Fernando Yoshinobu KURODA.

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Yamanashi    5

Several sources list Hoshitango's real name as "Imach Marcelo Salomon", with an accent on the second "o".

 

 

Edited by Yamanashi
left off quotation mark

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McBugger    420
14 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Tochitaikai - Wikipedia gives his name as "Sri Aminda de Perera" - I don't know which parts of that are the surname (just DE PERERA oder AMINDA DE PERERA?), and while I also don't know if it's actually correct, that reading looks a lot more plausible than the DB's current version.

 

I believe I can help with this one. I've spent some time in Sri Lanka and around Sri Lankans.

Sri is an honorific and is definitely not part of the name. Since the DB refers to him in katakana as "S(h)i Aminda di Berera", where there's definitely a mis-transliteration (de Perera, not Berera), there might be another one in the forename. My guess is that he is neither Sri Aminda, Si Aminda or Aminda, but Chaminda (චමින්ද), which is a far more common given name than Aminda. This is not to say that the name Aminda does not exist, but it's more of a "novelty name" that wouldn't have been widely used at all in 1968.

de Perera is fairly uncommon too in comparison to simply "Perera", but there are quite a lot of de Pereras so I think it's fine. 

The greatest issue here, possibly, is that that isn't nearly Chaminda de Perera's full name. The Sinhalese have notoriously long names and I've never seen just one forename and one surname. One forename plus one surname is what you generally introduce yourself as, but to only have one forename is nearly unheard of except in the Tamil community (which he almost certainly is not part of with that name). The typical Sinhalese person has three or four forenames. Many people, especially those from traditionally affluent families, might have more than one surname as well. In cricket, you have a man that is widely referred to as Mahela Jayawardene, while the record books and scorecards have Denagamage Proboth Mahela (forenames) de Silva Jayawardene (surnames). Same with "Chaminda Vaas", whose full name is Warnakulasuriye Patabendige Ushantha Joseph Chaminda (forenames) Vaas (surname).

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yutarotanaka    16
15 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Part 2 with the hodge-podge of foreign rikishi originating from countries other than the US and Mongolia. For the most part I'm only going to mention those rikishi for whom I have something reasonably useful to add; the rest are either guys whose data looks correct or who are so obscure that I have nothing. But I'm going to add links to the DB's country overviews, so feel free to take a look yourself, maybe you've got something I don't have.

Relevant umbrella reference: Wikipedia's list of non-Japanese rikishi.

Philippines (4)

Kotokuzan (Filipino origin, JP shusshin) - Wikipedia reminded me that Filipino newspapers have given his full name as Jasper Kenneth ARBOLADURA TERAI - I'm correct to assume that Arboladura is a surname, right?


 

Yes, ARBOLADURA would be his middle name which is from his mother's maiden surname.

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Asashosakari    8,528
8 minutes ago, McBugger said:

I believe I can help with this one. I've spent some time in Sri Lanka and around Sri Lankans.

Sri is an honorific and is definitely not part of the name. Since the DB refers to him in katakana as "S(h)i Aminda di Berera", where there's definitely a mis-transliteration (de Perera, not Berera), there might be another one in the forename. My guess is that he is neither Sri Aminda, Si Aminda or Aminda, but Chaminda (චමින්ද), which is a far more common given name than Aminda. This is not to say that the name Aminda does not exist, but it's more of a "novelty name" that wouldn't have been widely used at all in 1968.

de Perera is fairly uncommon too in comparison to simply "Perera", but there are quite a lot of de Pereras so I think it's fine. 

Many thanks for that. Looks like somebody on the forum even had the same idea 10 years ago when the Sri Lankan's presence in sumo was first mentioned. (I wonder what else we've buried in the depths of the forum...)

As for the likely existing longer full name - I suspect for a guy who never competed beyond maezumo we can be happy if we'll just manage to get a sensible transcription for the (kana) parts that we do know. :-) I don't expect these threads to lead to perfection in the end, just improvement, so every little bit helps.

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Asashosakari    8,528
4 minutes ago, yutarotanaka said:

Yes, ARBOLADURA would be his middle name which is from his mother's maiden surname.

That has confused me now. B-) Is it treated like a double surname (similar to the custom in Spain) or is it an additional personal name (treated like a first name) that just originates from the mother's surname?

Edited by Asashosakari

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yutarotanaka    16
5 minutes ago, Asashosakari said:

That has confused me now. B-) Is it treated like a double surname (similar to the custom in Spain) or is it an additional personal name (treated like a first name) that just originates from the mother's surname?

Not quite... It's not part of the surname and it's not a personal name either.

Here in the Philippines, our names are composed of three parts. The FIRST/GIVEN NAME, MIDDLE NAME (or MIDDLE INITIAL) and your LAST NAME/SURNAME/FAMILY NAME. The first/given name can be one, two or three names (or more -- depending on how much you hate your child. Hehe. I don't know if there are people who give their child more than three first/given names. At least in my experience, I've never seen it done.) The middle name is the mother's maiden last name/surname. It's usually just abbreviated to its first initial hence its other designation, the MIDDLE INITIAL. The last name/surname/family name is of course, the father's last name/surname/family name.

Sometimes, a particular last name/surname/family name can be  traced back to a particular province, city, municipality and town. So basically, the middle name is a good piece of information used here in the Philippines to try and trace someone's hometown, provincial origins, family tree, genealogy, etc.

Using Kotokuzan's name as an example. JASPER KENNETH would be his first name/given name. ARBOLADURA would be his middle name (or A. as a middle initial). And TERAI would be the LAST NAME/SURNAME/FAMILY NAME.

Hope this helps clear things up a bit :)

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Asashosakari    8,528

Well then, I guess it's up to Doitsuyama how he wants to handle that for the DB. :-P Thanks for the clarification!

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Senkoho    428

As for Sokokurai, I don't think the latinized name should be a transcription of Mongolian. He's Chinese by citizenship, so his official name is written in hanzi (kanji) and thus should be transcribed using Hanyu Pinyin, shouldn't it?

Edited by Senkoho

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Gurowake    1,393
3 hours ago, Senkoho said:

As for Sokokurai, I don't think the latinized name should be a transcription of Mongolian. He's Chinese by citizenship, so his official name is written in hanzi (kanji) and thus should be transcribed using Hanyu Pinyin, shouldn't it?

This can start a debate as to what it means to be someone's "official" name.  My grandmother went by Corrine, but her mail was often addressed to Cornelia.  She claimed that her name was absolutely not Cornelia, it just happened to be what the government said it was.  Similarly, I would guess that Sokokurai thinks of his Mongolian name as his "real" name, and his Chinese name as just something the government says.

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Burajirotono    14
On 13/09/2017 at 16:04, Asashosakari said:


Brazil (16)

Hakusan - A 1978 newspaper article from Texas makes passing reference to him and gives the name as Pasquale BOSCHE, so reversed order from the DB and spelled a bit differently. I noticed that Wikipedia already gives that spelling. Anyone remember the source?

Azumakaze - Wikipedia has opted for a different name order, as Tuzatto Giuliano KOCHINDA. No idea which one is right,  nor if the transcribed name parts are spelled correctly.

Kuniazuma - I think his names are reversed (should be RAMOS as surname); in addition the Kyokai has his given name as Vander and so does the guy himself, assuming this is a real Facebook account. So, Vander RAMOS probably.

Ryuko - Wikipedia has his given name(s) as "Luis Go", A 2005 article by the New York Times has him as Luiz Go IKEMORI - I'm not sure which spelling to trust, but I think the presence of a second Western given name should be reflected. Has a ja.wiki article which mentions that he was naturalized on 1996/04/22 (same day as Akebono) and has been just IKEMORI Go since then.

Takaazuma - Wikipedia has "Christiano Luis" rather than "Cristiano Luiz". Can't find anything firm either way, but I do think the DB is wrong in treating "Luiz" as part of the surname; I think that's just DE SOUZA. The Kyokai no longer has his real name listed on the English side (a lot of these seem to have disappeared in the site changes of the last few years) - I assume the DB's spelling originated from there, but I'm not sure theirs was correct. In general, my impression is that the Kyokai's online katakana name transcriptions were less trustworthy before 2006 or so.

Masuyama (Brazilian origin, JP shusshin) - I'm not positive, but SOUSA is probably part of the surname.
 

 

-Pasquale Bosche sounds veeeery weird for my brazilian ears. But some people have weird names, so...

-My city, São Paulo, have many descendents from italy and japan imigrants, so we have many italo-nipo-brasileiros here...Giuliano Kochinda Tuzatto its quite possible.

-When imigrants came from japan they got their family names by the brazilian authorities like Vito Corleone in Godfather´s style...So, many "brazilian-japanese" names may sounds funny in Japan...I guess "Go" is this kind of case.

-Vander Ramos sounds normal.

-Luiz in 99% of the cases is a first name. With Z or S...Both correct. "de Souza" (with lower case d) its something like Von Souza for germans.

-Sousa its a surname for sure.

Espero ter contribuído meus queridos...Sorry for my shitty english boys! 

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Senkoho    428
7 hours ago, Gurowake said:

This can start a debate as to what it means to be someone's "official" name.  My grandmother went by Corrine, but her mail was often addressed to Cornelia.  She claimed that her name was absolutely not Cornelia, it just happened to be what the government said it was.  Similarly, I would guess that Sokokurai thinks of his Mongolian name as his "real" name, and his Chinese name as just something the government says.

What he'd like to be called is one thing, what his Chinese ID states is another. I think these threads are all about getting all the FACTS straight and the fact is probably (no, I have not seen Sokokurai's ID,but the name must  definitely be written in hanzi ) that his name in the documents is Enhetubuxin.

Edited by Senkoho

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Gurowake    1,393
3 minutes ago, Senkoho said:

What he'd like to be called is one thing, what his Chinese ID states is another. I think these threats are all about getting all the FACTS straight and the fact is probably (no, I have not seen Sokokurai's ID,but the name must  definitely be written in hanzi ) that his name in the documents is Enhetubuxin.

I think this goes beyond a case of what someone "likes to be called", even if that's almost entirely the case with my grandmother.  What I meant was to emphasize that his Mongolian name might be what his entire culture thinks of as his "real" name, and his official Chinese name something imposed on by an authority from a different culture who wants people to assimilate.  Ok, sure, we can say that the Chinese government is by definition right, but it feels like it's unfair to the Inner Mongolians who don't necessarily want their cultural naming habits being changed.  He has a Mongolian name and a Chinese name, and they each may have different realms of validity.

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Naganoyama    1,921

The 4 rikishi listed in the database with shusshin Philippines have the name Philippines (single l, double p) incorrectly spelt as Phillipines (double l, single p).

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Asashosakari    8,528
On 14.9.2017 at 18:39, Senkoho said:

As for Sokokurai, I don't think the latinized name should be a transcription of Mongolian. He's Chinese by citizenship, so his official name is written in hanzi (kanji) and thus should be transcribed using Hanyu Pinyin, shouldn't it?

I think there's already precedent for using the "intended" name for the DB rather than the straight transcription in such mixed-up language/citizenship cases. If Kotokuzan decided to relinquish his Philippine citizenship, I don't think he should then be relisted as TERAI Jasupaa Kenesu just because 寺井 ジャスパー ケネス has become his only governmentally recognized name. You make a good point though, and I'm glad it's not up to me to decide what to put in the DB in the end. :-)
 

7 hours ago, Naganoyama said:

The 4 rikishi listed in the database with shusshin Philippines have the name Philippines (single l, double p) incorrectly spelt as Phillipines (double l, single p).

D'oh! I've been watching myself trying to avoid making that typo in these posts, but I never noticed that it's not right in the DB.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Yamanashi    5

Regarding Ryuko from Brazil, a 2008 article on a site commemorating 100 years of Japanese emigration to Brazil has a story on "Luis Go Ikemori".  Relying on my shaky Portuguese, it says that he started judo at age eight with the urging of his father, Luiz Ikemori.  He saw a sumo performance at an exclusive competition for Nikkei athletes, which led him to a sumo center in Sao Paulo.

 

So, Luis Go Ikemori?

 

 

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ryafuji    180
On 9/13/2017 at 15:04, Asashosakari said:

Hakusan - A 1978 newspaper article from Texas makes passing reference to him and gives the name as Pasquale BOSCHE, so reversed order from the DB and spelled a bit differently. I noticed that Wikipedia already gives that spelling. Anyone remember the source?

Nanyozakura - no luck finding anything about him. Wikipedia has his given name as Faaleva, but I don't know the source for that.
 

 

I can help with these two. From Grand Sumo by Lora Sharnoff (yes I'm wheeling it out again)...... She also has "Pasquale Bosche" for Hakusan. For Nanyozakura, she gives his name as "Fofoga Faaleva", so maybe the DB is reversed. She mentions that he quit sumo after going to visit his ailing mother and never returning to Japan. She gives Nankairyu's name as Kiriful Saba.

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ryafuji    180

For completeness, the rest of the non-American foreigners mentioned in Grand Sumo:

Tochinohana - Liu Chuo-huei 

Kiyonohana - Zhang Li-hua

Seiko - Koo Chun Bong (DB has Gu Zhen Bang)

Hoshitango - Marcello Salomon Imach (DB has wrong surname?)

Hoshiandesu - Jose Antonio Flores

Ryuko - Luis ikemori

 

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Asashosakari    8,528
19 minutes ago, ryafuji said:

Hoshitango - Marcello Salomon Imach (DB has wrong surname?)

Given that they used Imachi for his shikona given name, I would be a bit surprised if that's his original surname. Newspapers of the time have both versions, but the DB's SALOMON is the predominant one. What I find more interesting is that "Imach" is everywhere back then, but no "Imachi" at all. That's something I didn't even think to check. (Marcelo vs Marcello is another issue, I suppose.)

Here's an Argentinia-based (but in English) news website with an article from 2009, in which he's given as Imach Marcelo SALOMÓN. (But he's not the topic of the article, so hard to say if this was verified in any way.)

Edited by Asashosakari

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Senkoho    428
On 16.09.2017 at 03:24, Asashosakari said:

 If Kotokuzan decided to relinquish his Philippine citizenship, I don't think he should then be relisted as TERAI Jasupaa Kenesu just because 寺井 ジャスパー ケネス has become his only governmentally recognized name.

Well, I'd say he should :) But I understand your and Gurowake's point of view, as well. So let's just agree to disagree on this matter.

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