Kaikitsune Makoto

Colonoscopy

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Notorious splenic flexure is sometimes rather difficult to pass and the movement of the hand holding the shaft of the scope often resembles hineri move in shitatehineri or uwatehineri. That combined with suction often does the trick when the tip is already close of around the corner there.  Whenever you see shitatehineri, think of splenic flexure.

There is considerable satisfaction in clearing a diffucult nasty colon without causing extra pain to patient or failing to reach the ileum. Every colon is different. Unlike gastroscopy, colonoscpopy is always an adventure of a kind to scopist. Colonoscopy can also cause mental distress ( "I can't do this anymore, no more doctor work for me!" and "aaaaaaaaaaaaargh!!!!!!!!!" etc) but tremendous professional satisfaction and pride. When you work on a particularly difficult looping colon with 180 degrees tight corners, fixations from former surgeries, extensive sigmoid diverticula, whole world loses significance, there is only you and the colon. There is no family, no rain, no news, no tomorrow, no Tochinonada, only the colon, the scope, the delicate co-operation of the hands working of the scope controls and the shaft of the scope, the nurses and the monitor. Surely such total immersion moments exists in vast number of other types of work/activities too.

It can't be said what age the patient is only by looking at the colon. It can look exactly the same in 15 year old and 85 year old. Once the scope is inserted through the anal orifice (15 year old and 85 year old anus does look and feel different when index finger is first inserted to evaluate possible rectal tumours, sphincter tonus etc), the landscape is not aged. Ileum is beautiful (unless it is damaged by nasty Chron's disease) with its villi and velvety surface. I sometimes say to patients "now is the chance to admire your inner beauty". Some patients don't see the beauty in it though. If there is a cancer, I don't suggest patients to look at the monitors to see their enemy as the image is over 40 times magnitude and even a small cancer looks like something from hell or horror cataloque.

There was some news about Oosunarashi and colonoscopy maybe 2 years ago. There even was the Japanese word for "colitis" there. Now if there is a true colitis prolonged so that colonoscopy is done, the finding quite often is either ulcerative colitis or Chron's disease. If he underwent colonoscopy just because of prolonged diarrhea, then quite possibly no such finding. Lot of ice hockey players have come out with their diagnosis of ulcerative colitis or Chron's disease as it is often young adults' disease and quite common nowadays in many areas of the world.

Colonoscopy is a great procedure than can diagnose cancer, polyps, ulcerative colitis, Chron's disease, microscopic colitis, diverticular disease etc. and is different in every procedure to the scopist and can be satisfying line of work. For the patient it is definitely the only way they can ever witness their own anus from the inside and retroflexion of the scope can be done inside rectum to visualize hemorrhoids, anal papilla and possible pathologies of the anal area.

Go have yourself colonoscopied and be well. I am sure there are lot of nasty difficult colons on this forum. Your colon does a lot of work daily even if you constipate like crazy. Respect your colon and be nice to it. It might then be nice to you (or not..).

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Asojima    1,896

Somehow, I have always missed out on an appreciation of the beauties of this procedure.

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Yamanashi    221

How strange.

scope: n. a magnifier of images of distant objects. (italics supplied)

Telescope

However, microscope and colonoscope.

(Sorry for the digression, but this is the Off-topic section.)

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Manekineko    193

'cause it's all Greek: skopein ( σκοπείν ) = to look (at)

In English just "scope" can mean other things as well, for example.

Scope in the meaning you list is pro'lly just an abbreviation of telescope.

Cinema is an abbreviation of cinemascope, "looking at movement" or sth like that (all my Greek comes from scientific terminology).

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Atenzan    758
On 11/20/2017 at 22:39, Manekineko said:

Cinema is an abbreviation of cinemascope, "looking at movement" or sth like that (all my Greek comes from scientific terminology).

In modern Greek at least, cinema is short for κινηματογράφος (French cinematographe)- which would be ancient Greek for "motion scribe" approximately.

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neonbelly    38

I'm too old to go to Med School and turn pro, but your beautiful post inspired me to get into amateur colonoscopy just for the love of the game.

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Washuyama    431

I'm scheduled to get my first colonoscopy at my next annual checkup (I'm turning 50) and after reading this, I don't know whether to be excited, relieved or terrified.

Edited by Washuyama
Typo

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Bumpkin    351
2 hours ago, Washuyama said:

I'm scheduled to get my first colonoscopy at my next annual checkup (I'm turning 50) and after reading this, I don't know whether to be excited, relieved or terrified.

I had my first colonoscopy on October 31. The only thing to be scared of is the liquid you drink beforehand. Followed by excavating your bowels. That is terrifying. After that, it's a piece of cake. I slept through mine. 

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Finngall    15

Aside from the main goal of cleaning out the system, I've always suspected that the pre-colonoscopy regimen is a means of getting you to the point of, "Stick anything anywhere you want, just lemme eat normally afterwards, ok?"

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Kuroyama    570
On 11/28/2017 at 08:16, Bumpkin said:

I had my first colonoscopy on October 31. The only thing to be scared of is the liquid you drink beforehand. Followed by excavating your bowels. That is terrifying. After that, it's a piece of cake. I slept through mine. 

I don't know about terrifying, but you certainly don't want to be far from a toilet at any point that day.

The aftermath is interesting. They pump you full of air so they have room to look around. Nothing is more satisfying than the post-colonoscopy fart. And since they squirt blue dye up there for contrast, so anything remaining red will stand out better -- this is why they want you to keep away from red-colored liquids while you're emptying out -- you'll poop blue for the next day or so.

Edited by Kuroyama

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Akinomaki    17,923

I will refrain from getting into details, but if I ever do that again I will demand a written agreement that they'll won't try again getting past the corner in my colon - and I will only take the first colonoscopy of the day.

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Suwihuto    58
14 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

I will refrain from getting into details, but if I ever do that again I will demand a written agreement that they'll won't try again getting past the corner in my colon - and I will only take the first colonoscopy of the day.

Yes, I remember that corner too. (Justwhatdoctorordered...)(Releasingbadair...)

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Bumpkin    351
22 hours ago, Kuroyama said:

Nothing is more satisfying than the post-colonoscopy fart.

I'm still waiting.

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Kuroyama    570
1 hour ago, Bumpkin said:

I'm still waiting.

Oh dear. Well, at least you now have built-in flotation.

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