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Yubinhaad

2017 Natsu - Kimarite Statistics

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Greetings all. Here are the kimarite statistics for all divisions in the 2017 Natsu basho. The total number of torikumi surpassed the 2,500 mark for the first time since January 2011.

Sadogatake-oyakata must have organised a special amiuchi training session for his deshi ahead of this basho, since the heya accounted for all three occurrences of that technique here.

Amanoshima will be at a new career-high rank on the next banzuke after another successful leg hunt this basho, getting four of his five wins with ashitori. Kotodairyu was among his victims for the second basho in a row. Elsewhere, Ikeru collected two ashitori wins on his return to Makushita, while Jonokuchi yusho winner Enho got the other one, surviving a mono-ii about a possible isamiashi.

Speaking of Ikeru, take a look at his win against former Juryo Dairaido on Day 5. The shitatehineri itself was nice, but gyoji Kimura Satoshi also deserves a pat on the back for his evasive manoeuvre.

Toseima collected the 10th nichonage win of his career in this basho, becoming the first rikishi to reach double-digits with one of my favourite kimarite.

There were two ketaguri here, both coming in sekitori bouts. Arawashi got the first one against Takekaze, while Kyokutaisei got the second against Rikishin, in what was a rather forgettable basho for all four rikishi. Also, Tsugaruumi clinched his kachi-koshi with the only kekaeshi this time.

Okuridashi wouldn't normally be mentioned in the notes, but this basho saw an inordinate amount of rikishi getting the bum's rush, as Kintaro might say. 101 isn't quite a record, but it's the first time in a decade that the total has reached three figures, and only the fourth basho overall (among basho where all-division data is available, of course). It's the first time in the current kimarite era that okuridashi has accounted for more than 4% of bouts.

Three fairly uncommon kimarite made their first appearance of the year in this basho. On Day 4, Hokutosato managed to back Omura out of the dohyo for an ushiromotare win, and then Kobayashi turned the tables on Asayokomichi with a harimanage throw. And on the following day, Ota had a non-technique tsukite win as Chiyooume's hand touched down on Day 5 (with a second tsukite following on Senshuraku).

Kimarite from kettei-sen bouts are not included in the statistics.

 

Kimarite Makuuchi Juryo Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi Total Percentage
Abisetaoshi 2 0 0 1 2 0 5 0.20%
Amiuchi 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0.12%
Ashitori 0 0 2 4 1 0 7 0.28%
Chongake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Fumidashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Fusen (default) 4 0 1 1 6 2 14 0.56%
Gasshohineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Hansoku (foul) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Harimanage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Hatakikomi 28 14 36 58 37 7 180 7.16%
Hikiotoshi 13 13 19 23 28 3 99 3.94%
Hikkake 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 0.12%
Ipponzeoi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Isamiashi 0 1 2 0 5 0 8 0.32%
Izori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kainahineri 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04%
Kakenage 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0.12%
Kakezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Katasukashi 6 3 5 3 2 0 19 0.76%
Kawazugake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kekaeshi 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04%
Ketaguri 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0.08%
Kimedashi 2 1 3 5 1 1 13 0.52%
Kimetaoshi 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 0.12%
Kirikaeshi 1 1 0 2 2 2 8 0.32%
Komatasukui 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Koshikudake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Koshinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kotehineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kotenage 9 2 8 12 10 3 44 1.75%
Kozumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kubihineri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Kubinage 1 0 0 1 0 1 3 0.12%
Makiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Mitokorozeme 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Nichonage 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Nimaigeri 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Okuridashi 10 4 22 20 41 4 101 4.02%
Okurigake 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Okurihikiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Okurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Okuritaoshi 1 0 3 9 1 4 18 0.72%
Okuritsuridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Okuritsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Omata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Osakate 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.04%
Oshidashi 84 36 107 176 169 41 613 24.39%
Oshitaoshi 7 4 20 24 35 15 105 4.18%
Sabaori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sakatottari 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Shitatedashinage 1 0 0 3 1 1 6 0.24%
Shitatehineri 1 2 1 1 1 0 6 0.24%
Shitatenage 4 12 7 17 18 8 66 2.63%
Shumokuzori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sokubiotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sotogake 1 1 0 1 2 0 5 0.20%
Sotokomata 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sotomuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sototasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Sukuinage 8 2 8 12 8 5 43 1.71%
Susoharai 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0.04%
Susotori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tasukizori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tokkurinage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tottari 2 1 1 2 1 0 7 0.28%
Tsukaminage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tsukidashi 4 1 12 8 9 2 36 1.43%
Tsukihiza 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Tsukiotoshi 19 10 30 42 20 11 132 5.25%
Tsukitaoshi 1 0 1 6 1 0 9 0.36%
Tsukite 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0.08%
Tsumatori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tsuridashi 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0.12%
Tsuriotoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Tsutaezori 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Uchigake 0 0 0 2 3 0 5 0.20%
Uchimuso 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Ushiromotare 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Utchari 0 0 2 4 3 0 9 0.36%
Uwatedashinage 3 3 9 1 6 2 24 0.96%
Uwatehineri 1 1 0 1 1 0 4 0.16%
Uwatenage 7 11 21 23 34 6 102 4.06%
Waridashi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Watashikomi 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 0.16%
Yaguranage 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Yobimodoshi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00%
Yorikiri 81 77 75 178 200 43 654 26.02%
Yoritaoshi 7 9 17 39 45 18 135 5.37%
Zubuneri 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.04%
Edited by Yubinhaad
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This was the first tournament in many tournaments in which there were more oshidashi (84) winning techniques than yorikiri (81) winning techniques seen in the Top Division.  Hakuho utilized yorikiri frequently (5X + 2 yoritaoshi) as is expected of powerful Yokozunas – only resorting to oshidashi once.  From whence came the extra thrusting in this tournament?  Fellow Yokozuna, Harumafuji, was partly to blame.  He resorted to oshidashi 4X in May, whereas in the previous two tournaments, he only used that technique once.  Clearly, he changed his strategy hoping to bring about his first championship win in five tournaments.  But the tournament ended with an epic yotsuzumo battle, and Hakuho proved he was still the master of yorikiri.

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2 hours ago, Amamaniac said:

This was the first tournament in many tournaments in which there were more oshidashi (84) winning techniques than yorikiri (81) winning techniques seen in the Top Division.

I noticed that too while processing the results for Tipspiel. But then again, I remember watching some of these oshidashi which would usually pass as yorikiri. The chunks of salt to be taken with the kimarite calls just got bigger.

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Just curious, but has there ever been a sekitori who has won a 15-day zenshoyusho with all yorikiri?  Somehow I doubt it...

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On 1.6.2017 at 21:11, Amamaniac said:

Just curious, but has there ever been a sekitori who has won a 15-day zenshoyusho with all yorikiri?  Somehow I doubt it...

Maybe there's a more elegant way to look it up, and maybe it has been discussed elsewhere, but I used this query and then searched for "yorikiri" in the individual results. According to that, the answer is no: 12 out of 15  was the maximum, it seems.
 

Top 3 (# means no yorikiri on senshuraku):

12    Tochinoshin    Aki 2014    Juryo 5 West

11    Hakuho    Haru 2009    Yokozuna 1 West
11#    Takanohana    Kyushu 1994    Ozeki 1 East
11    Takanohana    Aki 1994    Ozeki 2 West
11#    Takanosato    Aki 1983    Yokozuna 1 West
11    Mienoumi    Hatsu 1980    Yokozuna 1 East
10#    Kitanoumi    Haru 1979    Yokozuna 1 East

On the other side of the spectrum (# means yorikiri on senshuraku):

2    Asashoryu    Natsu 2005    Yokozuna 1 East
2#    Taiho    Kyushu 1966    Yokozuna 1 East
2    Chiyonoyama    Hatsu 1957    Yokozuna 2 West Haridashi
2    Futabayama    Haru 1943    Yokozuna 1 West
1    Taiho    Hatsu 1964    Yokozuna 1 East
0    Asashoryu    Haru 2004    Yokozuna 1 East
0    Kitanofuji    Kyushu 1963    Juryo 5 West

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