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Akinomaki

Old kesho mawashi

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I won't put them into the thread for the new ones. Many recent older ones collected from the NSK site are at http://kesho-mawashi.blogspot.com

The sumo museum usually has a few from their collection of old kesho mawashi on display, some get presented on the net. The pics from the older version of the site are gone by now (but some were saved on the wayback machine), only the pics from the older exhibitions of this fiscal year are still there. The display page since the present exhibition has much bigger pics.

From the last exhibition, one from Koshinoto with the calabash mark of the Matsue-han, his daimyo employer, woven with sheep wool.

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and in the present one, one from Orochiyama as yusho flag bearer for his first individual yusho May 1926 - he was the 2nd to receive the 1st Emperor's cup created that year. Under the old system from 1909 to 1931 the real yusho and the flag went to the best team, east or west, and the flag was presented to the highest ranked one of the winning team, who also won his last day bout. Then he passed it to the rikishi below ozeki with the best result: he had the honor to carry the yusho flag down the hanamichi, wearing the kesho mawashi he received for this - showing the NSK (predecessor) mark, the date of the basho and  "presented to the flag bearer".

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one from Itsutsushima from his local Nagasaki-pref Goto islands koenkai, showing the Chinese deity Shouki that drives away plagues and demons

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Edited by Akinomaki
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Looks like a ceramic or porcelain piece that was sewed onto the mawashi.

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Also in the present exhibition at the sumo museum: a kesho mawashi set of Wakanohana I, the devil of the dohyo - one of it: o

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From the Natsu basho exhibition a nice example of how Japanese used to get written right to left: later yokozuna Ootori with a kesho mawashi from Kabuto(samurai helmet)-beer for his juryo zensho, i.e. 6 wins and no loss, but 1 draw, 1 undecided and 2 pauses.

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The kesho mawashi of Oshioyama (not the one in the DB) was handed back to his family's house after 60 years. This one was a samurai, real name Yoshimura Goeimon 吉村五右衛門, 161cm, 1769-1797.

He came to Edo in 1788 as bodyguard with the daimyo of Yonezawa-han and got the urge to participate in Edo sumo, received the permission and the next year took part in an Edo sumo day 9 kanjin-zumo 勧進相撲 tournament in 1789. He started in makushita, kept winning and in the end pushed out Tanikaze (the DB has him still as sekiwake then, the story has him as ozkei). The daimyo was delighted and gave him a battle sword and this red kesho mawashi, 75.8x220cm double fold, and from the kaisho (the NSK of the time) he got the shikona Oshioyama, the title of hereditary caretaker of Edo sumo, and the permission to build a 2storey tawara dohyo (pic in the video) at home in the Yonezawa domain.

News page with video http://www.yonezawa-np.jp/html/newsmovie/2018_2H/20180825mov1.html

His portrait with the kesho mawashi by local artist Kanou Bunshin (1890-1975) was used for the cover of a new book on Oshioyama

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the present Yoshimura family head with the author

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Edited by Akinomaki
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Today in Sankei: a kesho-mawashi which Takamiyama got from his Maui koenkai - Jan. 6th 1968, new makuuchi   o

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while searching for more info, I got to the Kyodo pics DB - and added it to my overview routines - 50% more pics than the Jiji DB, easier to access, the watermark not so big in the pic, but only medium size pics

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in color

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more kesho-mawashi

the one from PanAm - Feb. 24th 1967

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Feb.3.1968 - Go For Bronze(?) - Hawai (with kanto-sho)

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as new recruit, Mar. 15th 1964

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Jiji results

the PanAm one - with David Jones and boxer Takeshi Fuji

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as tsuyu-harai for new yokozuna Kitanofuji, Meiji shrine, Jan. 31st 1970

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one from the Takamiyama koenkai he donated to the sumo museum - Kokonoe accepts it for the museum - May 22nd 2009

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The sumo jinku preservation society in Tamba, Hyogo has 6 kesho mawashi from Osaka-sumo rikishi of the Taisho era. http://www.kobe-np.co.jp/news/tanba/201904/0012269449.shtml

the one held up in front is from Jinriki, a makuuchi who later was juryo in the merged Dai-NSK, the younger brother of ozeki Jinmaku Tokutaro wiki/陣幕徳太郎, who retired before the merger - both from Kato-city, Hyogo

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Posted (edited)
On 09/12/2016 at 19:37, Akinomaki said:

one from Koshinoto with the calabash mark of the Matsue-han, his daimyo employer, woven with sheep wool.

A small exhibition of 14 ukiyo-e is under way in the Shimane museum of ancient Izumo: "The Matsue-han calabash corps" - rikishi with the calabash-chain kesho mawashi, esp-this by Katsukawa Shunei of Narutaki Chuugorou http://j-town.net/event/museum/293691.html

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more exhibits: http://www3.pref.shimane.jp/houdou/files/3872B6CE-EB81-49CD-9ABA-3364281C8688.pdf

One  is of m1 Itadaki Sennosuke (former shikona Nekomata Toraemon - both full shikona are in use now), by Utagawa Kunisada - a picture exactly like this https://digitalmuseum.rekibun.or.jp/edohaku/app/collection/detail?id=0194200444&y1=1842&y2=1862

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but with a calabash kesho mawashi instead

Also Raiden was employed by the  Matsue-han - but he wears a kesho mawashi without the calabash in the shown picture

local NHK vid http://www3.nhk.or.jp/lnews/matsue/20190902/4030003518.html

Edited by Akinomaki
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When the city of Tsushima carried out a survey of its cultural treasures, it discovered that Nagasaki Prefectural Tsushima High School still had a kesho-mawashi of Taisho-era Ozeki Tsushimanada. An employee who had worked there for over 40 years recalled that when the current school building was opened in 1978, the old one was converted into warehouse space, and the kesho-mawashi was likely packed away somewhere and forgotten about while everyone was busy with the move.

Born in a village called Kuwa, upon reaching adulthood Tsushimanada joined the Japanese army, serving in Tsushima's heavy artillery battalion. Due to his great height a senior officer recommended he be discharged in favour of taking up sumo, and so he entered Dewanoumi-beya at 21, although his hatsu dohyo was delayed until 1910 as he was struggling with a thiamine deficiency.

To mark his Ozeki promotion he received the kesho-mawashi from the Tsushima(no)kuni koenkai, but unfortunately his time at the rank was cut short due to a left arm injury. He completed only one of the next five basho and retired from ozumo at 34, returning to Tsushima where he died in 1933 at the age of 45.

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Tsushimanada is shown wearing the kesho-mawashi on this commemorative postcard, issued at the time of his Ozeki promotion.

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The postcard is in the collection of Tsushimanada's great niece Chiyoko Kawakami, along with another of his kesho-mawashi and a haori with his family crest. That kesho-mawashi was given by Morinaga Confectionery and features the company's angel logo.

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His modern-day namesake, Sakaigawa-beya's Tsushimanada, is not related but was given the shikona as his father and grandfather both hail from Tsushima, which I didn't know before.

Edited by Yubinhaad
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