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Kintamayama

Oosunaarashi podcast

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How does one get the advertisers with 27 views in 9 hours? How does one have such a monotone voice and think, not just get the job but even think about getting a job in broadcasting?

Osunaarashi's english is tremendous.

I can't believe the nerve of this guy telling Osunaarashi that he needs to improve his technique on the belt. The man beat Harumafuji on the belt.

Edited by hamcornheinz

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How does one get the advertisers with 27 views in 9 hours? How does one have such a monotone voice and think, not just get the job but even think about getting a job in broadcasting?

Osunaarashi's english is tremendous.

I can't believe the nerve of this guy telling Osunaarashi that he needs to improve his technique on the belt. The man beat Harumafuji on the belt.

I say! Steady on old chap. I think you're being a little unfair. I don't really care how few views it's had, because this is way more about Osunaarashi than I knew before.

Whilst I may have preferred to see a nice cosy chat in Mr Gunning's apartment (dodgy lighting scenario and all!), the interviewer ain't anything like as bad as your post led me to expect. And I heard him asking Osu if his belt technique was an area he could improve upon. A leading question, yes, but Osu agreed.

I wholeheartedly agree with your assessment of Osu's English, though!

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How does one get the advertisers with 27 views in 9 hours? How does one have such a monotone voice and think, not just get the job but even think about getting a job in broadcasting?

Osunaarashi's english is tremendous.

I can't believe the nerve of this guy telling Osunaarashi that he needs to improve his technique on the belt. The man beat Harumafuji on the belt.

I say! Steady on old chap. I think you're being a little unfair. I don't really care how few views it's had, because this is way more about Osunaarashi than I knew before.

Whilst I may have preferred to see a nice cosy chat in Mr Gunning's apartment (dodgy lighting scenario and all!), the interviewer ain't anything like as bad as your post led me to expect. And I heard him asking Osu if his belt technique was an area he could improve upon. A leading question, yes, but Osu agreed.

I wholeheartedly agree with your assessment of Osu's English, though!

Well I just wonder how anyone can make any money with that kind of popularity. The point of any type of broadcasting, really, is to get advertisers, and you only get them when you have views.

It's a sign of bad social skills (bad broadcasting) to take a person's humble assessment of their work as a real assessment of their work... if someone, who has defeated yokozuna on the belt, says he needs to be better on the belt, hes being humble, and taking him literally is rude and condescending. Imagine someone asking Muhammad Ali if he needed to work on his defense, or Roger Federer if he needed to work on his clay game.

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As he says in the podcast most people download the audio version. The small number of views is for the video version which isn't surprising given the video was completely minimal with just a few still pictures. I don't see why he would even bother with a video with nothing to show.

That being said, not a great interview. It's great to have anything in English but the swearing was ridiculous. I don't see why he brings up so many negative things regarding sumo, such as the crappy life at first, hazing etc. At one point he was practically leading him to say some guys don't really try hard against other guys. All these topics are important and should be pursued by reporters but you are going to get some weird answers from anyone who is as high up as Oosunaarshi. The guy isn't going to come out with specifics on negative things about the sport which is paying his salary.

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> FightBoy Podcast interviewed Oosunaarshi:

He's still saying "Dintche".

Dintche know that??

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I wouldn't put Osu on a par with Federer or Ali. They were at the pinnacle of their sports, whereas Osu is not; beating a couple of yoks is not being a yok.

Osu's assessment of his own abilities, modest as it was, was still realistic. He has great potential, but I've watched him often enough to know that he does need to improve his belt technique (amongst other things).

Since this podcast was intended for an English speaking audience, I think it's exactly the right place to be discussing just how hard life as a rikishi can be, and is for the vast majority who never make it to sekitori. When it comes to dissuading impressionable gaijin kids from getting into something that could break them mentally and physically, I don't think it can be over-emphasized.

Johnny Cash put it far better than me in 'A Boy Named Sue':

"Son, this world is rough

"And if a man's gonna make it, he's gotta be tough."

Osu's toughness and determination shone through his modesty, and my admiration for him grew.

The main reason I don't want to see people being put off listening to the podcast is the things they could find out that they didn't know before. Here's some I found out:

1. Osu broke a bone in his foot partway through the last basho, which kind of explained some of his losses.
2. What it's like to be a practising moslem in Ozumo.
3. That he has no friends or social life outside his heya. I was under the impression he and Terunofuji were friends...
4. That he hasn't considered what he wants to do after Sumo!
5. That his body-builder physique is too stiff compared to the top rikishis' suppleness.

Fair enough, if you learned nowt from it and the interviewer's tone of voice or style got on your wick, then you've every right to dislike it. Please bear in mind however that some of us know really very little, and a podcast like this is manna from heaven.

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I really enjoyed the interview. Don's voice was totally fine, fairly on par for a lot of sports podcasts (although the way he pronounced most Japanese names made me cringe), and I felt the questions were fair. Sumo's a beautiful sport, but there's good and bad in everything, and I felt Oosunaarashi handled the questions very well.

On the subject of questions about improvement:

if someone, who has defeated yokozuna on the belt, says he needs to be better on the belt, hes being humble, and taking him literally is rude and condescending. Imagine someone asking Muhammad Ali if he needed to work on his defense, or Roger Federer if he needed to work on his clay game.

I'm no boxing expert, but I do watch a lot of tennis, and the moment any of the active tennis greats - Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Serena - show any sign of weakness, any chink in their armor, they're hounded by the media in the press room. It can be incredibly hard to watch sometimes. The NFL, NBA, etc. get the same treatment; both players and coaches have to field negative question after negative question before they've even had time to really process a loss. The questions on this podcast were nowhere near that level of mean, and seemed fairly respectful to my ears. Plus, as RabidJohn pointed out, Oosunaarashi isn't quite a Federer yet - if you're talking tennis players, he's probably more along the lines of a Berdych or a Nishikori, a top 10 player with all the tools to take out the big guys, but can't yet make it to that highest point.

Sorry for that little tennis-based aside there. Again, a fascinating interview! I feel like, between the manner he conducts himself during tournaments, his frequency in updating his Facebook and Instagram, and his transparency in interviews like this, Oosunarashi is one of the very few rikishi where you're able to get a fairly decent picture of what their daily existence is like. And for a foreign fan, that's remarkable. The only time sumo gets any coverage whatsoever out here in California is when Yama and Byamba are having another exhibition.

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Enjoyed the interview and appreciate Oosunaarashi's honesty. He really is becoming a joy to watch on the dohyo for me. Here is a clip of a press conference for promoting tourism in Egypt that he mentioned in the podcast. Appointed goodwill ambassador by Egypt's tourism authorities, he was in Cairo June 2nd saying that he "wanted to encourage and contribute to not only sports (sumo), but various tourism activities as well for the sake of Egypt".

News article related to above clip

Edited by inhashi
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I was thinking about this recently, and because it involves Osunaarashi I figured I might as well say it in the active thread about him.

Ramadan does not fall at all during a basho this year, being from June 5 to July 5. Assuming this is accurate, Ramadan will start at the very end of Natsu basho in 2017 (which is as late as possible that year), will overlap all of Natsu for 2018 and 2019, end near the end of Natsu in 2020, then end near the beginning of Natsu in 2021.

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I enjoyed the podcast. Somehow my small complaints became much larger than they were intended to be received. I found his comments on Osunaarashi's belt technique disrespectful, when on a good day, he could beat yokozuna on the belt. When someone says something self-deprecating, the normal thing isn't to ask him how he thinks he should improve himself. It's condescending. That was all.

My examples with Muhammed Ali and Federer, were because Ali tended to get punched more than others and Federer hasn't been as dominate on clay as on other courts. I used them because they are recognizable names, not because they were at the pinnacle of their sport.

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Whilst I may have preferred to see a nice cosy chat in Mr Gunning's apartment (dodgy lighting scenario and all!),

... the lighting will be better. It had been a long time since I did any video work. Before the digital age in fact. Starting to catch up on it now. Better equipment and software will be used soon.

Sorry, I wasn't intending to be critical of your efforts. You could shoot it on hand-held Cine 8mm with a cassette audio and I'd still lap it up!

Glad to see you back here, btw. :-)

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loved the podcast, getting to hear from one of my favorite rikishi, and in english no less! (I was definitely impressed with his English) makes me very happy to hear how humble and down to earth he is.

I loved his confidence on getting to Ozeki! Looking forward to it!

And I'm always excited for what Nishinoshima has for us next! :D

Edited by kosomo
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