Asashosakari

Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Natsu 2016

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Oops, sorry, didn't look at all the heya. Ishibashi and Tamaki are both Takasago (or so you say).

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Day 12 (results, text-only results):

12-0 Hakuho Y1 Kakuryu 9-3

10-2 Harumafuji Y2

12-0 Kisenosato O1 Goeido 7-5

7-5 Kotoshogiku O2 Terunofuji 2-10

The two leaders marched on, and it's officially a three-horse race now after Kakuryu was driven out by Kotoshogiku (who took a big step towards not going kadoban). With Hakuho and Kisenosato winning today and meeting tomorrow, the yusho score is guaranteed to be at least 13-2, which means Harumafuji's chances are not terribly large anymore - he'd need to beat both leaders and rely on Kakuryu beating whoever wins the Hak-Kise bout.

Kaisei was the only winner in lower sanyaku today, sending Myogiryu to makekoshi and out of contention, while putting himself forward as the top contender for a sekiwake promotion. Ikioi lost his 6th straight bout and will be heading to the maegashira ranks after the basho, with Okinoumi joining him after today's defeat by Shodai.

It's not quite official yet, but with two slots available and contenders falling left and right, it appears quite likely that Tochinoshin is on the way up again. The race for the second spot is still wide open, however.

5-7 Kotoyuki S Ikioi 3-9 (x)

6-6 Kaisei K Okinoumi 4-8 (x)

(x) 4-8 Myogiryu M1 Takarafuji 5-7

M2 Ichinojo 4-8 (x)

M3

6-6 Yoshikaze M4 Tochinoshin 9-3

7-5 Tochiozan M5 Takayasu 8-4

M6

M7 Osunaarashi 7-5

M8 Mitakeumi 8-4

Amuru seems determined to make the most of his return to the basho, winning his third match in a row. Seiro and Chiyotairyu were also successful (for the first time in five and four days respectively), though all of them still need to win 3 more for absolute safety. Gagamaru is nearly home now, having rediscovered his steamroller mode in the last couple of days, while top division rookie Nishikigi still has some more work to do. Hidenoumi picked up another loss, his fifth in a row, and is now definitely dropping down to the lesser division.

Turnaround in upper juryo again: today it was time for the middle-ranked contenders to shine, while only Toyohibiki was victorious among the top 4. It's not the prettiest promotion race, but it sure is suspenseful... There are so many candidates that it's hard to write anything without recapping basically the whole torikumi, so apologies for the brevity of this paragraph.

(x) kyujo Kyokushuho M8

...

M12 Amuru 3-5-4 (3)

M13 Hidenoumi 2-10 (x)

(2) 5-7 Nishikigi M14 Seiro 4-8 (3)

(1) 6-6 Gagamaru M15

(3) 5-7 Chiyotairyu M16 ---

(3) 5-7 Homarefuji J1 Satoyama 5-7 (3)

(2) 7-5 Toyohibiki J2 Chiyoshoma 6-6 (3)

(o) 10-2 Chiyonokuni J3 Arawashi 6-6 (3)

(3) 7-5 Kitaharima J4 Sadanofuji 7-5 (3)

(2) 8-4 Kagayaki J5

(~) 7-5 Ishiura J6

(x) 6-6 Fujiazuma J7 Chiyoo 6-6 (x)

(~) 8-4 Azumaryu J8

J9

J10

(~) 9-3 Asabenkei J11

J12

(~) 10-2 Sato J13

Crucial bout in low maegashira land tomorrow as Amuru and Seiro are facing off. And over in juryo we'll have the interesting J2 matchup between Toyohibiki and Chiyoshoma, with Satoyama and Sadanofuji meeting in another high-ranker clash that will have promotion implications. (Okay, "clash" may be the wrong word when Satoyama and his submarine tachiai are involved...)

The losing streak matchup in lower juryo was won by Amakaze, who's now almost safe, quite contrary to his opponent Akiseyama who is looking more and more likely to pick up back-to-back divisional demotions. Certainly going down again is Tamaasuka, falling to makekoshi against Dewahayate today (who has rescued himself with that).

J5 Akiseyama 0-12 (3)

...

(o) 5-7 Dewahayate J9 Amakaze 4-8 (1)

J10

J11 Jokoryu 4-8 (2)

J12 Kagamio 1-6-5 (x)

J13

(x) 4-8 Tenkaiho J14 Tamaasuka 4-8 (x)

Ms1 Daiki 3-3

Ms2 Kyokutaisei 4-2

3-3 Ryuden Ms3 Onosho 6-0 (o)

Ms4 Kotoeko 4-2

3-3 Hamaguchi Ms5 Sakigake 3-3

Kyokutaisei gets the ball rolling on the homestretch exchange bouts tomorrow. He's nearly certain to return to juryo even now, but beating Jokoryu would put him into a good position to create a little space between himself and the bottom of the division on the next rankings. Elsewhere in makushita only yusho contender Onosho will be in action, everybody else is being held back for the final two days.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Juryo yusho leaders:

10-2 Chiyonokuni, Sato

9-3 Asabenkei, Ura

7-4 Kagayaki, Azumaryu

Lotsa wins today with the top 4 and two third-tier pursuers all victorious. Things are heating up a bit now with an actual contenders' match tomorrow when Chiyonokuni and Asabenkei are meeting up. Sato is going against promotion-contending Ishiura (7-5), while Ura is getting another easy-on-paper opponent with Amakaze (4-8). I sure hope they're going to test him at least a little bit on the last two days, or this could be the emptiest 12-3 record I've ever seen...

Lower division yusho races:

6-0 Ms3w Onosho (Onomatsu)

6-0 Ms39w Takamisato (Azumazeki)

6-0 Ms58w Oyanagi (Tokitsukaze)

6-0 Sd44w Kotodaigo (Sadogatake)

6-0 Sd66e Ishibashi (Takasago)

6-0 Jd10w Tamaki (Takasago)

6-0 Jd41w Asayamabana (Takasago)

6-0 Jd61w Obamaumi (Sakaigawa)

6-0 Jk10w Ikegawa (Hakkaku)

No bouts means no changes except some cleanup of the list. We do have the assignments for the final round now, and it's Onosho versus Takamisato for the guaranteed 7-0 record after all, with Oyanagi facing somewhat stalled-out prospect Kotokobai (Ms25e 5-1). That should be a decent test, and Oyanagi's seventh win is by no means certain there.

Sandanme will see the expected straight-up meeting of the two 7-0's, which is arguably the highlight bout of all these 6-0 matchups. Down in jonidan it's Tamaki who will face Obamaumi (this could be interesting, too), while his stablemate Asayamabana has been posted against the highest-ranked 5-1 in the division, Jd3e Teraosho. The sole jonokuchi leader Ikegawa has received the expected high-rank, low-risk opponent in 5-1 Jd68e Oyamatoumi, so the possible 6-1 playoff is looking unlikely now.

Edited by Asashosakari
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And the Day 12 update of the ex-sekitori crowd:

4-2 Ms2w Kyokutaisei (Tomozuna, 26, 1)

3-3 Ms3e Ryuden (Takadagawa, 25, 21)

6-0 Ms3w Onosho (Onomatsu, 19, 1)

4-2 Ms4w Kotoeko (Sadogatake, 24, 7)

3-3 Ms5w Sakigake (Shibatayama, 30, 8)

4-2 Ms6w Kizenryu (Kise, 31, 4)

2-4 Ms7e Shotenro (Fujishima, 34, 1)

2-4 Ms8e Kotomisen (Sadogatake, 32, 15)

2-4 Ms10w Tochihiryu (Kasugano, 29, 8)

4-2 Ms12e Abi (Shikoroyama, 22, 4)

4-2 Ms14e Yamaguchi (Miyagino, 27, 12)

5-1 Ms16e Wakanoshima (Shibatayama, 31, 3)

1-5 Ms17e Keitenkai (Onomatsu, 26, 22)

3-3 Ms17w Hishofuji (Azumazeki, 26, 28)

2-4 Ms18e Oiwato (Hakkaku, 35, 15)

2-4 Ms21e Sotairyu (Tokitsukaze, 33, 7)

4-2 Ms22w Tokushinho (Kise, 32, 3)

3-3 Ms23e Nionoumi (Yamahibiki, 29, 17)

3-3 Ms24w Takaryu (Kise, 24, 5)

kyujo Ms28w Dairaido (Takadagawa, 36, 58)

5-1 Ms32e Higonojo (Kise, 31, 12)

4-2 Ms42e Sagatsukasa (Irumagawa, 34, 13)

1-5 Ms44w Hitenryu (Tatsunami, 31, 28)

kyujo Ms46w Tokitenku (Tokitsukaze, 36, 2)

2-4 Sd4w Kaonishiki (Azumazeki, 37, 28)

2-4 Sd6e Dewaotori (Dewanoumi, 30, 57)

3-3 Sd9e Chiyoarashi (Kokonoe, 24, 17)

2-4 Sd12e Yoshiazuma (Tamanoi, 38, 10)

4-2 Sd17w Masakaze (Oguruma, 33, 21)

0-1-5 Sd93e Masunoyama (Chiganoura, 25, 7)

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Ryuden is 3-3 at Ms3 now after starting 0-3. If he wins, he is likely back in Juryo after 3-1/2 years. I'm guessing that's going to be some kind of record, and a fantastic achievement for him after spending multiple tourneys in Jk, presumably recovering from injury.

No chance - the record belongs to Hamanishiki, who spent 38 basho toiling in mostly Makushita before making his Juryo return, even if he got a slice of banzuke luck with all the gaps which needed filling after the yaocho expulsions. Ryuden would just about make the top ten in the category of slowest Juryo returns if he earns promotion this time, I think.

Leaving records aside, I do hope he completes the gyakuten kachi-koshi and gets promoted, it would be a well-earned reward.

Edited by Yubinhaad
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We all gotta cheer for Ryuden. He is a Kofuji-adopted rikishi.

Gambarimasu.

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No chance - the record belongs to Hamanishiki, who spent 38 basho toiling in mostly Makushita before making his Juryo return, even if he got a slice of banzuke luck with all the gaps which needed filling after the yaocho expulsions. Ryuden would just about make the top ten in the category of slowest Juryo returns if he earns promotion this time, I think.

A bit off, still - looking at the old Banzuke Topics from when Hamanishiki set the record, the top 10 all-time currently end in a 4-way tie for 9th place at 24 tournaments. Ryuden's 21 (if he gets promoted after this basho) would at least be the record among active rikishi though, exceeding Satoyama and Oiwato who both had 20-basho breaks (and Yoshiazuma who had 18).

By the way, the modern era record holder in terms of time appears to be Notonoyama who is one of those tied at 24 tournaments - but he did it in the early 1950s when there were fewer tournaments altogether, so the time that elapsed between his last and his next juryo appearance was 6 years and 10 months, 2 months longer than even Hamanishiki.

Edited by Asashosakari
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(Go here if you want to watch the lower division yusho bouts without seeing the results first.)

Juryo yusho leaders:

11-2 Chiyonokuni, Sato

9-4 Asabenkei, Ura

Both leaders won and both pursuers lost (Asabenkei straight-up against Chiyonokuni, of course), which means we officially have a two-horse race now. Surprising me a bit, the schedulers have decided to have Chiyonokuni and Sato face off tomorrow already - perhaps they are thinking they might have to do something special with Sato in case he goes to 12-2 and is a possible contender for a makuuchi promotion besides the yusho.

Lower division yusho races (Day 13 results and links to video):

7-0 Ms3w Onosho (Onomatsu)

6-1 Ms39w Takamisato (Azumazeki)

7-0 Ms58w Oyanagi (Tokitsukaze)

7-0 Sd44w Kotodaigo (Sadogatake)

6-1 Sd66e Ishibashi (Takasago)

7-0 Jd10w Tamaki (Takasago)

6-1 Jd41w Asayamabana (Takasago)

6-1 Jd61w Obamaumi (Sakaigawa)

7-0 Jk10w Ikegawa (Hakkaku)

Oyanagi had to work quite a bit for it against Kotokobai, but in the end we're getting the expected senshuraku showdown between him and Onosho, who wasted little time in dealing with Takamisato. It'll be the only Day 15 playoff as Asayamabana lost a close one against Teraosho and wasn't able to follow stablemate Tamaki to 7-0. Tamaki's bout with Obamaumi wasn't much to write home about, but I'm sure he isn't complaining.

Elsewhere we had a pretty nice battle in sandanme with Kotodaigo showing why he was ranked in single-digit makushita less than a year ago, before he got injured. Ishibashi will have another chance to win the sandanme yusho next basho as his 6-1 won't be enough to get him promoted to makushita this time. And down at the bottom Ikegawa had zero trouble in completing his zensho record, as usual the 5-1 opponent from jonidan wasn't much of a test despite the 50-rank advantage.

Edited by Asashosakari
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If Sato wins, possible matchup with Toyohibiki or one of the 7-7 Juuryo jois?

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It'll be the only Day 15 playoff

Only lower division playoff. The sekitori may well have their own. I'm not sure what saying "Day 15" is supposed to mean. For database purposes they are all on Day 16, and in reality of course they're all on Day 15. Perhaps it was a reference to when they do the playoffs? Not having watched live, I have no idea when the playoffs for each division occur. Do all of them but Makuuchi take place after the regular Juryo torikumi? There tends to be a lot of people in the video, way more than I'd expect for them being before Juryo.

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They really lucked in to Kotoyuki vs. Kaisei as being a relevant match on Day 14. Usually the S v K match(es) that end up getting held the last few days are utterly irrelevant or really lopsided, but this time they're both still in contention for sanyaku for next basho and the have the same record.

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No chance - the record belongs to Hamanishiki, who spent 38 basho toiling in mostly Makushita before making his Juryo return, even if he got a slice of banzuke luck with all the gaps which needed filling after the yaocho expulsions. Ryuden would just about make the top ten in the category of slowest Juryo returns if he earns promotion this time, I think.

A bit off, still - looking at the old Banzuke Topics from when Hamanishiki set the record, the top 10 all-time currently end in a 4-way tie for 9th place at 24 tournaments. Ryuden's 21 (if he gets promoted after this basho) would at least be the record among active rikishi though, exceeding Satoyama and Oiwato who both had 20-basho breaks (and Yoshiazuma who had 18).

By the way, the modern era record holder in terms of time appears to be Notonoyama who is one of those tied at 24 tournaments - but he did it in the early 1950s when there were fewer tournaments altogether, so the time that elapsed between his last and his next juryo appearance was 6 years and 10 months, 2 months longer than even Hamanishiki.

Thanks for that, I actually lost my pre-2012 archive of banzuke topics to a disk failure, so I was trying to work from memory to recall the top ten for that one.

And thanks for the video coverage, too!

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Day 13 (results, text-only results):

13-0 Hakuho Y1 Kakuryu 10-3

10-3 Harumafuji Y2

12-1 Kisenosato O1 Goeido 8-5

8-5 Kotoshogiku O2 Terunofuji 2-11

It was the hoped-for high profile bout between the two leaders, and yokozuna Hakuho eventually prevailed to become the new sole leader, and now likely yusho winner. The first all-yokozuna bout of the basho saw Kakuryu beat Harumafuji, pulling even with him at 10-3. Both will be facing Hakuho on the final two days, of course, and Kisenosato will have to hope for an upset (if one can call it that) to have a chance to get back into the yusho race.

Takayasu is riding a 5-day winning streak and has put himself firmly in the race for the next sanyaku. Tochinoshin is of course also still a major contender despite being forced down by Tokushoryu today, and resurgent Takarafuji (with four straight wins) may well be the next-best candidate even at 6-7. However, much will depend on the performance of Kotoyuki and Kaisei, now also both 6-7. (I suspect that Kaisei might even be able to stay komusubi with 7 wins, given that there may not be three good candidates for promotion at the end.)

6-7 Kotoyuki S Ikioi 3-10 (x)

6-7 Kaisei K Okinoumi 4-9 (x)

M1 Takarafuji 6-7

M2

M3

6-7 Yoshikaze M4 Tochinoshin 9-4

7-6 Tochiozan M5 Takayasu 9-4

M6

M7 Osunaarashi 7-6 (x)

M8 Mitakeumi 9-4

At least one of Kotoyuki and Kaisei will be finishing makekoshi as they're meeting tomorrow, a bit of torikumi serendipity as Gurowake noted. Tochiozan and Takarafuji are also facing off on Day 14, with the loser eliminated from contention.

Seiro is staying alive in the demotion race for now with a victory over Amuru who's demotable by the numbers at this point - but with plenty of other maegashira in the mix and the juryo picture still murky, it might still be possible for him to be safe with two more wins. The same may be true for Chiyotairyu who is now guaranteed to finish makekoshi at the very last rank after losing to Sokokurai. Nishikigi is also makekoshi now (having started 3-0) and still has to worry about dropping straight back to juryo after earning his top division debut.

Toyohibiki isn't quite back to makuuchi yet, but he took a big step today by reaching KK territory. He could still drop as low as #7 in the promotion queue so a 9th win would be helpful, but even 8-7 may well be enough in the end. The lower-ranked trio of Ishiura, Azumaryu and Asabenkei lost today and should be out of the running for even a lucky promotion now, and top-ranked Satoyama is definitely out, having gone makekoshi against Sadanofuji. The biggest wildcard remains yusho co-leader Sato - it's typically hard to get promoted from very low ranks even with an exceptional record so even 13-2 may not be enough, but the fact that the banzuke committee recently received a lot of fresh blood makes it hard to know how his performance will be viewed.

(x) kyujo Kyokushuho M8

...

M12 Amuru 3-6-4 (~)

M13 Hidenoumi 3-10 (x)

(2) 5-8 Nishikigi M14 Seiro 5-8 (2)

(1) 6-7 Gagamaru M15

(~) 5-8 Chiyotairyu M16 ---

(2) 6-7 Homarefuji J1 Satoyama 5-8 (x)

(1) 8-5 Toyohibiki J2 Chiyoshoma 6-7 (~)

(o) 11-2 Chiyonokuni J3 Arawashi 7-6 (2)

(2) 8-5 Kitaharima J4 Sadanofuji 8-5 (2)

(2) 8-5 Kagayaki J5

(x) 7-6 Ishiura J6

J7

(x) 8-5 Azumaryu J8

J9

J10

(x) 9-4 Asabenkei J11

J12

(~) 11-2 Sato J13

Besides the early yusho highlight bout between Chiyonokuni and Sato we'll only have one more direct matchup of promotion contenders tomorrow, between Kitaharima and Kagayaki.

Amakaze achieved a somewhat unlikely win over Ura today, securing his juryo spot for Nagoya. Akiseyama's astounding losing streak finally came to an end in a hard-fought heavyweight clash with Tenkaiho, while Jokoryu is on a five-day downward spiral of his own, leaving both of them two wins away from safety now. Kyokutaisei was today's victorious Jokoryu opponent and he completes his basho with a 5-2 record to return to the paid ranks immediately.

J5 Akiseyama 1-12 (2)

...

J9 Amakaze 5-8 (o)

J10

J11 Jokoryu 4-9 (2)

J12 Kagamio 1-6-6 (x)

J13

(x) 4-9 Tenkaiho J14 Tamaasuka 4-9 (x)

Ms1 Daiki 3-3

Ms2 Kyokutaisei 5-2 (o)

3-3 Ryuden Ms3 Onosho 7-0 (o)

Ms4 Kotoeko 4-2

3-3 Hamaguchi Ms5 Sakigake 3-3

More makushita opposition for Jokoryu tomorrow as Kotoeko is the next to get the call. Akiseyama's juryo survival will also depend on a mini-pattern as he follows up today's victory over a J14 with a bout against the other one. Down in makushita only Sakigake will be in action, but he's unlikely to figure into the promotion decisions from Ms5w.

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Where can I find definitions for notations inside parens?

(digit) = wins needed to be certain of promotion/non-demotion "by the numbers", e.g. 8-7 target record for J1, 9-6 record for J2/J3, 10-5 record for J4/J5 and so on

(o) = promotion/non-demotion certain

(x) = demotion/non-promotion certain

(~) = promotion/non-demotion still possible with some luck

Edited by Asashosakari

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Where can I find definitions for notations inside parens?

(digit) = wins needed to be certain of promotion/non-demotion "by the numbers", e.g. 8-7 target record for J1, 9-6 record for J2/J3, 10-5 record for J4/J5 and so on

(o) = promotion/non-demotion certain

(x) = demotion/non-promotion certain

(~) = promotion/non-demotion still possible with some luck

Arigato gozaimasu.

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Current by-the-numbers placements, current sanyaku subject to special considerations in parentheses:

-2w: Tochinoshin

(0e: Kaisei)

(1e: Kotoyuki)

1w: Takayasu

2w: Mitakeumi

3e: Tochiozan

Next on the list are Shohozan and Osunaarashi, but they can't pass Tochiozan.

Only match between any of these is Kaisei vs. Tochiozan. Tochinoshin's match is irrelevant as he can only be passed by Kaisei, and so is a lock for Sekiwake, leaving only 4 relevant matches. Kaisei is a lock on Sekiwake with a win, otherwise it's in the air between Kotoyuki with a win and Takayasu with a win. If Takayasu loses, I don't think anyone else would displace Kotoyuki with a win. If they both lose, it passes to Mitakeumi with a win, or if he loses too, to Tochiozan (who beat Kaisei).

The remaining number of sanyaku spots depend on whether Kotoyuki wins. Note in some cases the spot ends up being Sekiwake; the following is just talking about overall sanyaku spots, with which ones being Sekiwake decided as above.

If Kotoyuki wins, there are two open spots (well, three, but Tochinoshin has one of them). One goes to Kaisei if he wins, so that leaves one. It goes to Takayasu with a win, then Mitakeumi with a win, then defaults to Takayasu if they both lose. If Kaisei loses, there are 2 open spots. One of them goes to Takayasu with a win. The other could just default to Kaisei, although Mitakeumi might take a spot with a win, and they might even put Tochiozan there due to beating Kaisei the last day. But likely Kaisei stays sanyaku even with a loss. If Takayasu loses, then Mitakeumi gets a spot with a win, otherwise the last spot defaults to Tochiozan.

If Kotoyuki loses, then there's an additional spot opened up. Kaisei almost certainly stays sanyaku with a loss, although again it's possible that he gets displaced if Takayasu and Mitakeumi both win in favor of those two plus Tochiozan. That still leaves two spots, which will go to Takayasu, Mitakeumi, and Tochiozan in that order if they win, and default to them in that order if not enough of them win.

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So more concisely and less precisely:

Tochinoshin: Sekiwake for sure

Kaisei: Sekiwake with a win, likely Komusubi with a loss

Kotoyuki: Needs a win and that would guarantee a spot, and could be either rank.

Takayasu: Doesn't need a win, but it would guarantee a spot. Could be either rank with a win, only possibly Komusubi with a loss.

MItakeumi: With a win, could end up anywhere. With a loss, needs a lot of help to be Komusubi

Tochiozan: Needs a win, could end up anywhere.

Edited by Gurowake
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Sekiwake Tochinoshin... I really like the sound of that. (Dancing of joy...)

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After all the tournaments Tochinoshin has spent at komusubi it will be nice to see him land a sekiwake spot!

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It's one thing to get promoted to Sekiwake, it's another to stay there. He's had 1 KK at K or above. I'd like him to succeed but he needs to do more than the power stuff.

Edited by rzombie1988

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After all the tournaments Tochinoshin has spent at komusubi it will be nice to see him land a sekiwake spot!

Yeah, especially since I have had him as the second-best non-Ozeki for quite some time, and now with him outperforming Tochiozan despite a tougher schedule, I have Tochinoshin at the top of that list. He certainly has deserved to be Sekiwake for a while but the situations never worked out for it before.

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It's one thing to get promoted to Sekiwake, it's another to stay there. He's had 1 KK at K or above. I'd like him to succeed but he needs to do more than the power stuff.

I certainly agree with this as well. He doesn't fare all that well against the top dogs and doesn't show the signs of growth needed to really make a push for Ozeki. He had a decent start at one when the Yokozuna were absent, but as I predicted then, he couldn't get a KK once he was actually fighting all the Yokozuna, although one might say his 9-6 M1 -> M1 would have still been an 8-7 even if all the Yokozuna were participating. He's fairly dominant over the weaker rikishi, but his style makes it very hard for him to win against those that are even stronger.

Edited by Gurowake

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It's one thing to get promoted to Sekiwake, it's another to stay there. He's had 1 KK at K or above. I'd like him to succeed but he needs to do more than the power stuff.

I certainly agree with this as well. He doesn't fare all that well against the top dogs and doesn't show the signs of growth needed to really make a push for Ozeki.

In any pro sports, it is difficult to improve significantly after certain age. Sumo, I think, is somewhat of an exception b/c adding weight while done properly can significantly improve one's prospect. In case of Tochinoshin's Ozeki ambition, is it a matter of gaining 5, 10, or 15 lbs? Seems like he has some room to grow under his belt.

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A lot of getting to Ozeki is about avoiding injuries, and I think the oshi pushing sumo guys end up injured a lot more than the nage throwing guys, because when they push they just lift straight up.

Of course you need to have the skill and strength to do it, but a lot of guys who had that ended up getting hurt and never fulfilled that potential.

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