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Asashosakari

Retirees after Hatsu 2016

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9 more after Daido and Tosayutaka:

Aratoshi (Irumagawa, Mongolia, debut 2008.07, 30 years old, high rank Ms39)

Tamadaiki (Kataonami, Ishikawa, 2007.03, 27, Ms16)

Wakarikido (Nishonoseki, Aichi, 2002.03, 29, Ms31)

Takunishiki (Chiganoura, Chiba, 2006.01, 32, Ms6, Takushoku University grad)

Buseizan (Fujishima, Ibaraki, 2004.05, 34, Ms7, Toyo University grad, MsTd)

Harada (Miyagino, Tottori, 2014.01, 20, Sd51)

Ashitakayama (Shibatayama, Hokkaido, 2011.09, 19, Sd83)

Suzune (Tagonoura, Fukushima, 2015.03, 17, Jd59)

Yajima (Tamanoi, Kanagawa, 2015.03, 19, Jd49)

Pretty high-profile list of retirements this time with 7 guys with makushita-and-up experience. Tamadaiki was widely expected to be a future sekitori after reaching makushita as a teenager but never quite broke through. Takunishiki began his career with 12 straight KK, then bombed at Ms6 with a 1-6 record, got injured shortly afterwards and never threatened upper makushita again.

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Why do guys hang around in mid-maegashira for 10 years? Even lower down the banzuke there's guys in their late 20s or 30s: is it simply a lack of somewhere else to go?

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Why do guys hang around in mid-maegashira for 10 years? Even lower down the banzuke there's guys in their late 20s or 30s: is it simply a lack of somewhere else to go?

I'll take it you mean mid makushita, as anyone would be really happy to get sekitori (maegashira) pay for 10 years or so :).

To answer your question though, there is a large number of rikishi that are not really "professional athletes", but still feel themselves part of the sumo world. They live in a community that has a place for them and a job to do (even if its sort of a servant position really), a community that feeds them, houses them and provides them with medical insurance. Not to mention the fact that for a lot of those guys its really all they have known.

Take for example Hanakaze, the oldest active rikishi. The guy has been a rikishi for 30 years. Goes without saying that since in all those years he has a career high rank of Sandame 18, banzuke-wise he has consistently been going nowhere fast, but do you doubt that he feels his heya like his home and family by now? And even when he retires, the heya will probably keep him around in some role, or arrange for a job for him through a koenkai or something...

And, of course, there are also some guys that are bouncing around in mid makushita that still have a bit of potential, and maybe for some of them it feels worth it to try to make it to sekitori even at a relatively advanced age.

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The problem with sumo is that there really isn't that big of an amateur practice, otherwise in other sports, most people who haven't "made it" become coaches. As for the mid-Maegashira, you have to realize these people are still the very best out there. The best 70 of any sport aren't people to be looked down on.

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Why do guys hang around in mid-maegashira for 10 years? Even lower down the banzuke there's guys in their late 20s or 30s: is it simply a lack of somewhere else to go?

I'll take it you mean mid makushita, as anyone would be really happy to get sekitori (maegashira) pay for 10 years or so :).

To answer your question though, there is a large number of rikishi that are not really "professional athletes", but still feel themselves part of the sumo world. They live in a community that has a place for them and a job to do (even if its sort of a servant position really), a community that feeds them, houses them and provides them with medical insurance. Not to mention the fact that for a lot of those guys its really all they have known.

Take for example Hanakaze, the oldest active rikishi. The guy has been a rikishi for 30 years. Goes without saying that since in all those years he has a career high rank of Sandame 18, banzuke-wise he has consistently been going nowhere fast, but do you doubt that he feels his heya like his home and family by now? And even when he retires, the heya will probably keep him around in some role, or arrange for a job for him through a koenkai or something...

And, of course, there are also some guys that are bouncing around in mid makushita that still have a bit of potential, and maybe for some of them it feels worth it to try to make it to sekitori even at a relatively advanced age.

As a relative newbie, I get the feeling that basically people enter sumo because of these things :

1. You've been doing sumo amateurly for a while, are really good at it, and personally aiming to become sekitori.

2. You're proficient in other sports but has been scouted by a heya that tells you'd be god at sumo.

3. You're interested in sumo and want to try to get your hand at it. If it doesn't work then you can just opt out early.

4. You're out of options and basically got into sumo as a last resort. If you aren't any good hopefully if you can stay in it long enough you might eke out a living.

Am I somewhat right?

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So do Hanakaze and Hokutoryu have the record for most basho competed?

Aparently yes

Also is Hanakaze the oldest active rikishi ever or have people competed past his age?

In ancient history, there are several rikishi recorded as active at 50+ years of age.

If you only count rikishi who retired after 1909, the oldest I could find was Ichinoya who fought his last bout at 46 years and 11 months in 2007. Hanakaze does appear to be second on the list though.

And of course, it always amazes me to see that Kyokutenho ended up 11th on that list, even though he retired as a Makuuchi rikishi!

Edited by krindel

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So that means a new vacancy for a foreigner.

:-) It does indeed

Anyone in the pipeline? Or would that be telling?

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A few pictures from Takunishiki's danpatsu-shiki, held at Chiganoura-beya's senshuraku party. He now takes up a job in the IT department of a Tokyo trading company.

Takunishiki1.jpg

Takunishiki2.jpg

Final cut by the shisho (former Sekiwake Masudayama).

Takunishiki3.jpg

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Takunishiki5.jpg

Tidy-up haircut.

Takunishiki6.jpg

Farewell speech.

Takunishiki7.jpg

Smaller pictures from Wakarikido's danpatsu-shiki, held at Nishonoseki-beya's senshuraku party. He will return to his hometown of Toyota, Aichi prefecture and work at a restaurant run by a former stablemate, Harunoyama Chanko.

Wakarikido1.jpg

Wakarikido2.jpg

Final cut by the shisho (former Ozeki Wakashimazu).

Wakarikido3.jpg

With heyagashira Shohozan and a guest.

Wakarikido4.jpg

I don't know which is which, but among the guests were two other former stablemates, Wakakengo and former Juryo Wakatoryu, seen here chatting to their old shisho.

Wakarikido5.jpg

More small pictures, from Aratoshi's danpatsu-shiki at Irumagawa-beya's senshuraku party.

Aratoshi1.jpg

Aratoshi2.jpg

Aratoshi3.jpg

Aratoshi4.jpg

Aratoshi5.jpg

Aratoshi6.jpg

Aratoshi7.jpg

And finally, some variable size and quality pictures from Tamadaiki's danpatsu-shiki at Kataonami-beya.

Tamadaiki1.jpg

Tamadaiki2.jpg

Tamadaiki3.jpg

Tamadaiki4.jpg

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

Presumably, a member of Chiganoura-beya's koenkai is an executive there. Edited by Kuroyama

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

You wouldn't want to know what kind of people are working in our IT department...
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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

You wouldn't want to know what kind of people are working in our IT department...

Makes me think of the brilliant UK sitcom "The IT Crowd"

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

If its just a matter of turning it off and turning it on again that sort of describes Okinoumi's sumo.

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

He is a college grad. He presumably knows more than how to scrub toilets.

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

He is a college grad. He presumably knows more than how to scrub toilets.

Okay that answered the question right then and there.

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Unfortunately also Kirinohana from Michinoku Beya retired, 25 years old, highest ranking Sd 3 :-| . He finished Hatsu Basho with a 5-2.

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How in the world do you go from being a rikishi to working in an IT department?

He is a college grad. He presumably knows more than how to scrub toilets.

He can at least conceptualize the process.

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Unfortunately also Kirinohana from Michinoku Beya retired, 25 years old, highest ranking Sd 3 :-| . He finished Hatsu Basho with a 5-2.

Hm... do you know the reason?

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