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Asashosakari

Retirees after Kyushu 2015

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10 this time:

Makushita:

Masunoumi (Chiganoura)

Otakayama (Takadagawa)

Sandanme:

Hokuo (Takadagawa)

Jonidan:

Chiyohayate (Kokonoe)

Kurenishiki (Kasugano)

Higonohana (Kise)

Jonokuchi:

Noborufuji (Isegahama)

Komatsu (Kise)

Mori (Hakkaku)

Banzuke-gai:

Sakuyama (Chiganoura)

Masunoumi came in six years ago with some fanfare as a semifinalist from the previous national high school tournament, but never quite managed to break out of upper makushita. (Sasakiyama who joined in the same basho with even more expectations has arguably failed to an even greater degree, never establishing himself in upper makushita at all.)

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Maybe the veterans of the forum can shed sone light in this matter. I'm wondering what becomes of the guys like the ones in the list above after they leave sumo. They, for a lack of better wording, haven't achieved much in the many years they spent in sumo. What do most of them do after sumo? Do they have a plan on what to do after retiring? I think I read somewhere that some tried opening ramen shops? Can they become staff in the NSK at any capacity?

Sorry for the newbie barrage questions.

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I believe if you are able to go as far as makushita you may be able to become a sewanin at your heya. It is somewhat like a coach. I have no idea what the pay is for that. There will be former rikishi who run chanko restaurants, and they usually hire people who didn't make it far up the ladder.

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And even if they don't go the restaurant route, they can often secure employment at a business of one of their heya's koenkai members.

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they can often secure employment at a business of one of their heya's koenkai members.

Haven't thought about this type of koenkai support before. It reminds me of something Akinomaki once reported.

A Takanohana-ichimon-wide koenkai was launched in Osaka, …

The koenkai also wants to take care of the second career of retired rikishi and contribute to society.

So I guess the various koenkais often play an importand role here.

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I'm sad to know that Chiyohayate's career is over. He was very serious during keiko, fast and big heart rikishi. Good luck to him !

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Found a few extra pics from the danpatsu-shiki of Chiyohayate and Higonohana, so I'm reposting them all here.

Chiyohayate with some flowers in the hanamichi following his final bout, and speaking to (I assume) some reporters.

Chiyohayate1.jpg

Chiyohayate02.jpg

With an oichomage for the first and last time, joined by Chiyootori.

Chiyohayate03.jpg

Kokonoe-oyakata (former Yokozuna Chiyonofuji) speaks to the retiree during the heya's post-basho wrap-up chat.

Chiyohayate04.jpg

Kimura Konosuke officiated at the danpatsu-shiki, hopefully not yelling instructions at the participants.

Chiyohayate05.jpg

Rika Fukutomi, a singer I believe, makes her cut.

Chiyohayate06.jpg

Final cut by the shisho.

Chiyohayate07.jpg

Suited and booted after a proper haircut.

Chiyohayate08.jpg

Bonus pic from a past basho, featuring a familiar face.

Chiyohayate09.jpg

Higonohana also with some flowers following his final bout.

Higonohana.jpg

Having his hair put into an oichomage for the first and last time.

Higonohana02.jpg

Special scissors provided by the Kyokai for danpatsu-shiki.

Higonohana03.jpg

Higonohana's stablemates line up to make their cut.

Higonohana04.jpg

Gagamaru says farewell.

Higonohana05.jpg

After a proper haircut.

Higonohana06.jpg

To add to the post-sumo employment talk, former stablemates can also be a source of employment for a newly-retired rikishi. Last I heard, Kasachikara was working in 'Sumo Chaya Shogo', a restaurant in Ono, Fukui prefecture. It's the hometown of the restaurant's owner, a former stablemate from the old Nishonoseki-beya.

Speaking of Kasachikara, when he retired he had 256 fewer wins than losses over his long career. That deficit was "surpassed" in the Aki basho by Momochizakura. I can't say whether it's the all-time record for that, although it's a fair bet that it is. Meanwhile, in the Kyushu basho Momochizakura recorded the 9th zenpai result of his career, extending his own record for that.

Edited by Yubinhaad
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...when he retired he had 256 fewer wins than losses over his long career. That deficit was "surpassed" in the Aki basho by Momochizakura. I can't say whether it's the all-time record for that, although it's a fair bet that it is.

Give Moriurara a little time...he's at 154-355 now and still going strong.

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