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Asashosakari

Promotion/Demotion and Yusho discussion Kyushu 2015

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Is it already that time again? I guess it is...

Day 10 (results, text-only results):

6-4 Kakuryu Y1 Hakuho 10-0

9-1 Harumafuji Y2

5-5 Terunofuji O1 Kisenosato 8-2

7-3 Kotoshogiku O2 Goeido 6-4

He's not quite the Hakuho we're used to seeing, but what's unchanged is that he leads the yusho race, with only Harumafuji in direct pursuit.

Terunofuji and Goeido have one maegashira opponent left, all other remaining bouts for the yokozuna and ozeki will be against each other or against sekiwake. That looks like bad news for Kakuryu who might be headed for his first single-digit score since his yokozuna debut tournament, if not worse. Goeido of course needs 8 to maintain his rank, and unless he fails to beat Ichinojo tomorrow he should be in good shape. Terunofuji, however...

This basho's sanyaku race looks to be for two spots, as Myogiryu has already vacated the sekiwake level and looks likely to drop all the way to maegashira, while Tochinoshin is only one loss away from falling as well. Ikioi is the top contender mostly thanks to a fortunate banzuke position which has limited him to just Harumafuji and Terunofuji as high-ranked opponents. His standing does mean he'll be facing the cream of the maegashira ranks now (plus probably Yoshikaze at some point); early KK'er Shohozan was his opponent today, tomorrow he'll get underranked Takayasu.

5-5 Tochiozan S Myogiryu 2-8

3-7 Tochinoshin K Yoshikaze 6-4

4-6 Ichinojo M1 Osunaarashi 4-6

(x) 2-8 Aoiyama M2

4-6 Toyonoshima M3 Aminishiki 4-6

7-3 Ikioi M4 Endo 3-7 (x)

(x) 3-7 Amuru M5 Sadanoumi 4-6

(x) 4-6 Kotoyuki M6

7-3 Kaisei M7 Kyokushuho 6-4

M8 Takarafuji 7-3

M9

M10 Shohozan 8-2

7-3 Gagamaru M11

M12 Takayasu 8-2

Asasekiryu dropped to makekoshi today, unable to duplicate last basho's surprising effort, and he will be joining injured Tokitenku on the way back to juryo. Daieisho, Kitataiki and Sadanofuji have a lot of work to do to avoid the same fate.

It does look as though there's going to be some banzuke luck available as there isn't much pressure from the juryo ranks. Shodai is almost certainly headed to the top division, but all other candidates need to win more than half their bouts now. The three maegashira demotees from Aki basho are all worse than 5-5, so we're probably set for a rare basho where nobody will achieve an immediate makuuchi return.

M6 Homarefuji 2-8 (1)

M7

M8

M9 Sadanofuji 2-8 (3)

M10

M11 Mitakeumi 5-5 (1)

(o) 6-4 Takekaze M12

(o) 6-4 Chiyotairyu M13 Toyohibiki 5-5 (2)

(4) 3-7 Daieisho M14 Tokitenku kyujo (x)

(3) 4-6 Kitataiki M15 Chiyootori 6-4 (2)

(x) 2-8 Asasekiryu M16 ---

(3) 5-5 Takanoiwa J1 Kagamio 4-6 (4)

(4) 5-5 Kagayaki J2 Seiro 3-7 (x)

(5) 4-6 Hidenoumi J3 Jokoryu 6-4 (3)

J4 Fujiazuma 7-3 (3)

(4) 6-4 Arawashi J5 Shodai 9-1 (1)

J6

(x) 5-5 Akiseyama J7

...

(x) 7-3 Nishikigi J11

Juryo also has its first demotee already; Tamaasuka couldn't get anything going this basho and one has to wonder if it's the end of the line for him after Aki basho was already quite the disaster. Chiyomaru is the surprise second candidate for a trip to makushita, needing to win 4 out of 5 bouts. Nobody else needs more than 2, but there are so many rikishi in that position that it's not out of the question that one of them will drop.

Aki makushita yusho winner Chiyoshoma looks determined to make it back-to-back victories to clinch his sekitori debut, but for now he's not quite guaranteed the promotion yet. Still too many other candidates to say anything insightful about the promotion race beyond that, but Day 11 will likely help clear things up.

J6 Onosho 2-8 (2)

J7

(1) 4-6 Wakanoshima J8

J9 Azumaryu 5-5 (o)

(1) 5-5 Ishiura J10 Tokushinho 4-6 (2)

J11 Amakaze 4-6 (2)

J12 Chiyoo 5-5 (2)

(1) 6-4 Tenkaiho J13 Daido 5-5 (2)

(4) 4-6 Chiyomaru J14 Tamaasuka 2-8 (x)

3-2 Abiko Ms1 Abi 2-3

2-3 Kizenryu Ms2 Daishoho 3-3

(x) 1-4 Kotoeko Ms3 Chiyoshoma 5-0

3-2 Dewahayate Ms4 Chiyonokuni 3-2

2-3 Kairyu Ms5 Kisenoyama 1-4 (x)

Ms6 Shotenro 4-1

Edited by Asashosakari
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Juryo yusho arasoi:

9-1 Shodai

8-2 Daishomaru

7-3 Fujiazuma, Nishikigi

Shodai has already faced Fujiazuma and Nishikigi and will meet Daishomaru tomorrow. I have no idea if this race will maintain some suspense or turn into a foregone conclusion very soon...

Lower division yusho races (Day 9/10 results and links to video...many thanks to all involved in providing them!):

Ms3w Chiyoshoma (Kokonoe)

Ms31w Shiba (Kise)

Ms35e Kansei (Sakaigawa)

Ms54w Ura (Kise)

---

Sd21e Tochihayate (Kasugano)

Sd26w Ryuseio (Shibatayama)

Sd47w Hokutoshu (Hakkaku)

Sd69e Kyokuhozan (Tomozuna)

Sd90w Hirotsukasa (Irumagawa)

Sd96w Kiribayama (Michinoku)

---

Jd18e Tsubakifuji (Isegahama)

Jd42e Mitsuuchi (Onomatsu)

Jd47w Fujinokaze (Oguruma)

Jd78e Takiguchi (Onomatsu)

Jd95w Haguroho (Tatsunami)

---

Jk14e Kotohayato (Sadogatake)

Jk20w Kotozensho (Sadogatake)

Day 11 schedule

With Chiyoshoma the only zensho in the upper half of makushita they have elected to put him against Daido up in juryo for tomorrow, which certainly qualifies as a creative choice. Ura gets a sandanme opponent in turn, so we could be looking at 3 unbeaten makushitans at 6-0. Speaking of sandanme, none of the contenders seem to be particularly awe-inspiring, so I'm tempted to just anoint the highest-upside guy as the favourite, and that's of course Kiribayama.

The leading Sadogatake duo in jonokuchi means that jonidan could be headed for a wacky finish as 3 of the 5 leaders are paired up outside of their own division, so it's possible there will be just one unbeaten jonidan rikishi after six bouts. However, Haguroho has come down from mid-makushita through injury, so he's likely to knock (mid-sandanme quality) Kotozensho out of the race instead. Besides Haguroho the obvious jonidan favourite is strong newcomer Mitsuuchi.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Thanks for the great posts.

Assuming Oosunaarashi goes 8-7 at M1w, how many wins do you think Ikioi will need to overtake him on the next banzuke?

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Thanks for the great posts.

Assuming Oosunaarashi goes 8-7 at M1w, how many wins do you think Ikioi will need to overtake him on the next banzuke?

I'd say Ikioi needs a 10-5 then...

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Assuming Oosunaarashi goes 8-7 at M1w, how many wins do you think Ikioi will need to overtake him on the next banzuke?

I'd say Ikioi needs a 10-5 then...
Yeah, I agree. Wouldn't be all that justified on strength-of-schedule grounds, but it would look reasonable enough to promote the 10-5 guy who's been there before over the 8-7 guy who hasn't.

That's if we're talking about a situation where only one of them is getting promoted into sanyaku. If they're both moving up (either both to komusubi, or one to sekiwake and one to komusubi), I'd expect that M4e 10-5 goes ahead of M1w 8-7 100% of the time. It's only if one becomes komusubi and the other gets stuck at M1e that there's a bit of doubt about it.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Thanks for the replies. It will be a disappointment for me if Oosu doesn't get a sanyaku spot despite another KK at a fairly high maegashira rank.

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Thanks for the replies. It will be a disappointment for me if Oosu doesn't get a sanyaku spot despite another KK at a fairly high maegashira rank.

Same here. He's absolutely komusubi material IMHO, though I don't see him keeping it very long until he refines his sumo a bit. Still, I feel like Osunaarashi in the sanyaku is just a matter of time.

Needs to get that kachikoshi first, though!

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Statistics against K and S are also telling that Osunaarashi is more than ready for Sanyaku.

It doesn't look that much worse if you go back through 2014 either, although I admit his sanyaku opponents in 2014 were not of the same caliber. I hadn't realized that he beat all 4 junior sanyaku last basho and is halfway there this basho.

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Statistics against K and S are also telling that Osunaarashi is more than ready for Sanyaku.

It doesn't look that much worse if you go back through 2014 either, although I admit his sanyaku opponents in 2014 were not of the same caliber. I hadn't realized that he beat all 4 junior sanyaku last basho and is halfway there this basho.

And 2 out of his 3 losses were against Sekiwake who became Oseki the following basho, Goeido and Terunofuji.

I knew he won all bouts against S and K last basho, but I wasn't aware that he generally looks that good against these opponents.

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Yep, he's been very strong against komusubi and sekiwake. If he can break through and add an extra win or two per basho against ozeki and yokozuna then getting to lower sanyaku should be no problem.

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Sorry, got home way late today, so presented without comment for now:

Edit: And now with some rudimentary commentary...

Day 11 (results, text-only results):

7-4 Kakuryu Y1 Hakuho 11-0

10-1 Harumafuji Y2

6-5 Terunofuji O1 Kisenosato 8-3

7-4 Kotoshogiku O2 Goeido 6-5

The two leading rikishi marched on, while Terunofuji had a potentially crucial win against Yoshikaze and Goeido a potentially crucial loss to Ichinojo, leaving them both at 6-5. Yokozuna Kakuryu got back on track after back-to-back losses, beating ozeki Kotoshogiku and denying him the kachikoshi.

The first sanyaku slot officially became available with Myogiryu falling to 2-9. Ikioi reached KK territory at the expense of low-ranked Takayasu and continues to be the prime contender, although top-ranked Ichinojo and Osunaarashi (against Myogiryu, as it happens) kept themselves in the race.

5-6 Tochiozan S Myogiryu 2-9 (x)

4-7 Tochinoshin K Yoshikaze 6-5

5-6 Ichinojo M1 Osunaarashi 5-6

M2

4-7 Toyonoshima M3 Aminishiki 4-7

8-3 Ikioi M4

M5 Sadanoumi 4-7 (x)

M6

7-4 Kaisei M7 Kyokushuho 7-4

M8 Takarafuji 8-3

M9

M10 Shohozan 9-2

8-3 Gagamaru M11

M12 Takayasu 8-3 (x)

It's not looking too good for Daieisho in lower makuuchi, who picked up his 6th loss in 7 days to find himself nearly demoted now. Kitataiki lost to juryo visitor Takanoiwa and isn't in much better shape.

With that Takanoiwa also put himself in decent position for a return to makuuchi, needing to win just half his remaining bouts. He remains the only serious contender next to Shodai, who lost the highlight bout to Daishomaru but is still well on course to the top division.

M6 Homarefuji 2-9 (1)

M7

M8

M9 Sadanofuji 3-8 (2)

M10

M11 Mitakeumi 5-6 (1)

M12

M13 Toyohibiki 6-5 (1)

(4) 3-8 Daieisho M14 Tokitenku kyujo (x)

(3) 4-7 Kitataiki M15 Chiyootori 7-4 (1)

(x) 2-9 Asasekiryu M16 ---

(2) 6-5 Takanoiwa J1 Kagamio 4-7 (4)

(3) 6-5 Kagayaki J2

(4) 5-6 Hidenoumi J3 Jokoryu 6-5 (3)

J4 Fujiazuma 7-4 (3)

(4) 6-5 Arawashi J5 Shodai 9-2 (1)

Makushita #1 Abiko secured kachikoshi yesterday, while Chiyoshoma continues to be zensho after beating Daido up in juryo, and last night I had already marked both as certain promotions in the belief that Onosho would be out for the rest of the basho. Apparently the injured youngster is giving it another go though, so we're stuck with just one open slot for the moment and neither Abiko nor Chiyoshoma can be 100% sure yet. Recent juryo Abi fell to makekoshi and won't be returning to the paid ranks for now.

J6 Onosho 2-9

J7

(1) 4-7 Wakanoshima J8

J9

(o) 6-5 Ishiura J10 Tokushinho 4-7 (2)

J11 Amakaze 5-6 (1)

J12 Chiyoo 6-5 (1)

(o) 7-4 Tenkaiho J13 Daido 5-6 (2)

(3) 5-6 Chiyomaru J14 Tamaasuka 3-8 (x)

4-2 Abiko Ms1 Abi 2-4 (x)

3-3 Kizenryu Ms2 Daishoho 3-3

Ms3 Chiyoshoma 6-0

3-3 Dewahayate Ms4 Chiyonokuni 4-2

3-3 Kairyu Ms5

Ms6 Shotenro 4-1

Edited by Asashosakari
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Juryo yusho arasoi:

9-2 Shodai, Daishomaru

8-3 ---

7-4 Fujiazuma, Nishikigi, Tenkaiho

With the lesser pursuers all giving way, this looks like it's between Shodai and Daishomaru now.

Lower division yusho races (Day 11 results and links to video):

Ms3w Chiyoshoma (Kokonoe) 6-0

Ms31w Shiba (Kise) 6-0

Ms35e Kansei (Sakaigawa) 5-1

Ms54w Ura (Kise) 6-0

---

Sd21e Tochihayate (Kasugano) 5-1

Sd26w Ryuseio (Shibatayama) 6-0

Sd47w Hokutoshu (Hakkaku) 5-1

Sd69e Kyokuhozan (Tomozuna) 5-1

Sd90w Hirotsukasa (Irumagawa) 6-0

Sd96w Kiribayama (Michinoku) 5-0

---

Jd18e Tsubakifuji (Isegahama) 5-0

Jd42e Mitsuuchi (Onomatsu) 5-0

Jd47w Fujinokaze (Oguruma) 5-0

Jd78e Takiguchi (Onomatsu) 5-1

Jd95w Haguroho (Tatsunami) 5-0

---

Jk14e Kotohayato (Sadogatake) 6-0

Jk20w Kotozensho (Sadogatake) 5-0

Day 12 schedule

Looks like we might get a rare 7-0 playoff in makushita (last happened in Aki 2009)...at least I think they'll simply do Chiyoshoma-Shiba and Ura-Ryuseio, and Ura would likely be the favourite in his bout. Down in the low ranks the first Sadogatake rikishi was successful to potentially set up another rare 7-0 gig, but as mentioned Kotozensho will have the tougher job tomorrow.

Edited by Asashosakari
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I'd much rather see Chiyoshoma fight in Juryo again against someone safe (Tenkaiho) as a "preview" of next basho and have Ura vs. Shiba.

Edited by Gurowake

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Ura and Shiba are both Kisebeya. If you pair Chiyoshoma up into Juryo, then things get weird.

Edited by Ryoshishokunin

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Oops. Well, what I said is still true, even if it's impossible to actually happen.

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(A few comments have been added to the Day 11 sekitori tables above.)

Juryo yusho arasoi after Day 12:

10-2 Shodai, Daishomaru

9-3 ---

8-4 Fujiazuma, Nishikigi, Tenkaiho

For a change everybody won, so the race is unchanged except for the pursuers now having one day less to catch up, of course. Tomorrow Shodai faces Tenkaiho, the last 8-4 guy still available for him, while Daishomaru meets KK-chasing Arawashi. Fujiazuma makes a guest appearance in makuuchi, a relatively rare thing for a J4-ranked rikishi.

Lower division yusho races (Day 12 results and links to video):

Ms3w Chiyoshoma (Kokonoe) 6-0

Ms31w Shiba (Kise) 6-0

Ms54w Ura (Kise) 6-0

---

Sd26w Ryuseio (Shibatayama) 6-0

Sd90w Hirotsukasa (Irumagawa) 6-0

Sd96w Kiribayama (Michinoku) 6-0

---

Jd18e Tsubakifuji (Isegahama) 5-1

Jd42e Mitsuuchi (Onomatsu) 5-1

Jd47w Fujinokaze (Oguruma) 6-0

Jd95w Haguroho (Tatsunami) 6-0

---

Jk14e Kotohayato (Sadogatake) 6-0

Jk20w Kotozensho (Sadogatake) 5-1

Day 13 schedule

As expected no playoff in jonokuchi - at least not at 7-0. Somewhat surprisingly the schedulers aren't going with the straight-forward solution, i.e. Fujinokaze-Haguroho for the yusho in jonidan, Kotohayato against some "easy" 5-1 low jonidan guy. Instead it's Fujinokaze who faces a 5-1 opponent, while Haguroho gets the chance to knock the second Sadogatake rikishi off the unbeaten track. Kotohayato will be a harder task than Kotozensho, but I still expect Haguroho to be the winner there.

That would set up a 6-1 playoff involving Kotohayato and two of these jonokuchi 5-1's:

Jk13e Asaokado (Takasago)

Jk13w Oisato (Minezaki)

Jk20w Kotozensho (Sadogatake)

Jk21e Kototaiki (Sadogatake)

Yup, yet another Sadogatake guy (also with sandanme experience), so we could be headed for a unique* three-rikishi same-stable playoff here. Oisato has been to sandanme himself, though, so it's not a safe bet.

The 6 zensho rikishi in makushita and sandanme are paired up by ranking, so we're guaranteed to see one playoff out of these two divisions on Day 15.

(* Before anyone asks, I haven't checked if it would in fact be unique...)

Edited by Asashosakari

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As expected no playoff in jonokuchi - at least not at 7-0. Somewhat surprisingly the schedulers aren't going with the straight-forward solution, i.e. Fujinokaze-Haguroho for the yusho in jonidan, Kotohayato against some "easy" 6-1 low jonidan guy. Instead it's Fujinokaze who faces a 6-1 opponent, while Haguroho gets the chance to knock the second Sadogatake rikishi off the unbeaten track. Kotohayato will be a harder task than Kotozensho, but I still expect Haguroho to be the winner there.

That would set up a 6-1 playoff involving Kotohayato and two of these jonokuchi 5-1's:

Jk13e Asaokado (Takasago)

Jk13w Oisato (Minezaki)

Jk20w Kotozensho (Sadogatake)

Jk21e Kototaiki (Sadogatake)

Yup, yet another Sadogatake guy (also with sandanme experience), so we could be headed for a unique* three-rikishi same-stable playoff here. Oisato has been to sandanme himself, though, so it's not a safe bet.

The 6 zensho rikishi in makushita and sandanme are paired up by ranking, so we're guaranteed to see one playoff out of these two divisions on Day 15.

(* Before anyone asks, I haven't checked if it would in fact be unique...)

You seem to be awfully sure that Fujinokaze will lose his matchup with 5-1 Tsukimoto tomorrow. :-P

Regarding the same-heya-tomoesen, you are correct that this never happened yet to my knowledge. There have been 19 playoffs with three or more rikishi from the same heya but always with at least one more rikishi in it. Coming closest was Kyushu 1958 with only one extra riksihi when the Jonokuchi playoff had 3 rikishi from Nishonoseki-beya. Two out of the 19 occasions had even more same-beya rikishi: Kyushu 1970 had 4 rikishi from Hanakago-beya among 9 participants in the Makushita playoff , and the very big 11-rikishi Sandanme playoff in Aki 1964 featured even 5 rikishi from Kasugano-beya.

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You seem to be awfully sure that Fujinokaze will lose his matchup with 5-1 Tsukimoto tomorrow. :-P

Meh, I even corrected another instance of the same mistake... Fully fixed now, thanks!

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In other tournament events that I've participated in, it's somewhat of a joke that most people don't keep track of how many wins they have, only their losses and draws. That is, people almost always describe their record as X-1 or X-2-1 or whatever. They might say "Well, I'm X-1-1, and I just finished round seven, so I guess I'm 5-1-1". When you play 15+ rounds over two days, you tend to forget just how many times you've won, but know if you get a certain number of losses/draws you're effectively out and thus only keep track of that.

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Having done a little digging of my own through the DB...

Regarding the same-heya-tomoesen, you are correct that this never happened yet to my knowledge. There have been 19 playoffs with three or more rikishi from the same heya but always with at least one more rikishi in it. Coming closest was Kyushu 1958 with only one extra riksihi when the Jonokuchi playoff had 3 rikishi from Nishonoseki-beya. Two out of the 19 occasions had even more same-beya rikishi: Kyushu 1970 had 4 rikishi from Hanakago-beya among 9 participants in the Makushita playoff , and the very big 11-rikishi Sandanme playoff in Aki 1964 featured even 5 rikishi from Kasugano-beya.

Also noteworthy: That Kyushu 1970 tournament not only had 4 Hanakago rikishi in makushita, but also 3 Kasugano guys in sandanme. And even more weirdly, the Hatsu 1974 sandanme playoff had 3 rikishi from both Futagoyama and Kasugano among the 10 participants.

Another odd bit happened in Haru and Natsu 1957, which both featured a Tokitsukaze trio in back-to-back sandanme playoffs.

It's probably just random noise, but these triple appearances have disproportionately come in Fukuoka (7 of 19), and sure enough we're in Kyushu again now...

Edited by Asashosakari

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Day 12 (results, text-only results):

8-4 Kakuryu Y1 Hakuho 12-0

11-1 Harumafuji Y2

6-6 Terunofuji O1 Kisenosato 8-4

7-5 Kotoshogiku O2 Goeido 6-6

Hakuho and Harumafuji march on, and as was already mentioned elsewhere it's a bit of a shame that their clash is already taking place tomorrow and wasn't delayed to Day 15. Goeido dropped to 6-6, losing to Harumafuji, but I still wouldn't bet against him saving his rank with a slate of Kisenosato, Yoshikaze and Tochiozan for the final three days. Terunofuji will have a somewhat harder road to kachikoshi with Kakuryu, Hakuho and Kotoshogiku still to come.

The lower sanyaku not named Myogiryu were all successful today, so it looks almost certain that at most two slots will be available - Tochinoshin may still drop, but I can't see Tochiozan or Yoshikaze losing three in a row. The field of contenders may be thinning soon anyway as both M1's have fallen to 5-7 and will have to win through now for kachikoshi. (They haven't faced each other yet, so I would guess one of them will definitely be eliminated.) Ikioi improved to 9-3 and a lot will have to go wrong for him not to be in sanyaku in January.

6-6 Tochiozan S Myogiryu 2-10 (x)

5-7 Tochinoshin K Yoshikaze 7-5

5-7 Ichinojo M1 Osunaarashi 5-7

M2

5-7 Toyonoshima M3 Aminishiki 5-7

9-3 Ikioi M4

M5

M6

7-5 Kaisei M7 Kyokushuho 7-5

M8 Takarafuji 9-3

M9

M10 Shohozan 10-2

(x) 8-4 Gagamaru M11

Tough gig for Ichinojo tomorrow against rejuvenated Shohozan, while Osunaarashi has to contend with Tochiozan and Ikioi goes against the ever-dangerous Takarafuji. Tochinoshin's sanyaku rank will be on the line against Toyonoshima.

Daieisho sent Kagayaki back to juryo with a loss and kept his chances of survival alive. Kitataiki also won against struggling Homarefuji, but Sadanofuji was beaten and finds himself in some demotion danger now. Toyohibiki and Chiyootori are no longer threatened. (Although I wouldn't be surprised at all if Toyohibiki falls to MK from 7-5 now...)

Shodai beat Takanoiwa in the matchup of the juryo division's two biggest promotion contenders, and at 10-2 he's now not just through by the numbers, it's also almost impossible to envision a scenario where he will be stuck behind enough other candidates in the end. Fujiazuma hasn't won back-to-back bouts since Day 6, but steadily moves towards promotion because the rest of the contenders aren't doing any better.

M6 Homarefuji 2-10 (1)

M7

M8

M9 Sadanofuji 3-9 (2)

M10

M11 Mitakeumi 5-7 (1)

M12

M13 Toyohibiki 7-5 (o)

(3) 4-8 Daieisho M14 Tokitenku kyujo (x)

(2) 5-7 Kitataiki M15 Chiyootori 8-4 (o)

(x) 3-9 Asasekiryu M16 ---

(2) 6-6 Takanoiwa J1 Kagamio 5-7 (3)

(3) 6-6 Kagayaki J2

(~) 5-7 Hidenoumi J3 Jokoryu 6-6 (3)

J4 Fujiazuma 8-4 (2)

(3) 7-5 Arawashi J5 Shodai 10-2 (o)

Since ticketing his demotion to makushita Tamaasuka seems to have picked up some steam, winning his third straight bout. The three guys he has beaten were Onosho, Tokushinho and Daido, who haven't helped their own efforts with that. All of them need to win 2 out of 3 now, as still does Chiyomaru. His stablemate Chiyoo is another three-in-a-row winner after today, and the short streak has given him the wins needed to feature in juryo next basho as well.

As is customary on Day 12 in high makushita not much happened there, although veteran Shotenro kept himself on the outskirts of the promotion race with his 5th win. If things go really well for him he might still become the third-best candidate for promotion.

J6 Onosho 2-9-1 (2)

J7

(1) 4-8 Wakanoshima J8

J9

J10 Tokushinho 4-8 (2)

J11 Amakaze 5-7 (1)

J12 Chiyoo 7-5 (o)

J13 Daido 5-7 (2)

(2) 6-6 Chiyomaru J14 Tamaasuka 4-8 (x)

4-2 Abiko Ms1

3-3 Kizenryu Ms2 Daishoho 3-3

Ms3 Chiyoshoma 6-0

3-3 Dewahayate Ms4 Chiyonokuni 4-2

3-3 Kairyu Ms5

Ms6 Shotenro 5-1

They can't delay the exchange bouts this time as the kyujo situation dictates at least one matchup each day, and in what's been a trend recently it's the lowest-ranked candidate who goes first with Chiyonokuni against endangered incumbent Daido. The rest of the plan seems to involve only Kizenryu and Daishoho for exchange duty as Abiko and Dewahayate appear to be set against makushita opponents, as is Kairyu already tomorrow. (Or alternatively even Kizenryu versus Daishoho...)

Up in juryo there's a Chiyomaru-Onosho matchup on the schedule for tomorrow, which will leave one of them with his back against the wall. Tokushinho also has a tough bout, facing promotion contender Kagayaki from the top of the division.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Having done a little digging of my own through the DB...

Regarding the same-heya-tomoesen, you are correct that this never happened yet to my knowledge. There have been 19 playoffs with three or more rikishi from the same heya but always with at least one more rikishi in it. Coming closest was Kyushu 1958 with only one extra riksihi when the Jonokuchi playoff had 3 rikishi from Nishonoseki-beya. Two out of the 19 occasions had even more same-beya rikishi: Kyushu 1970 had 4 rikishi from Hanakago-beya among 9 participants in the Makushita playoff , and the very big 11-rikishi Sandanme playoff in Aki 1964 featured even 5 rikishi from Kasugano-beya.

Also noteworthy: That Kyushu 1970 tournament .

Just to add to that Kyu-1970 trivia.. What a beastly Juryo-joi: A future Yokozuna and three future Ozeki.

East Rank West Wajima J1 Asahikuni J2 Masuiyama Kaiketsu J4

Edited by Washuyama

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Having done a little digging of my own through the DB...

Regarding the same-heya-tomoesen, you are correct that this never happened yet to my knowledge. There have been 19 playoffs with three or more rikishi from the same heya but always with at least one more rikishi in it. Coming closest was Kyushu 1958 with only one extra riksihi when the Jonokuchi playoff had 3 rikishi from Nishonoseki-beya. Two out of the 19 occasions had even more same-beya rikishi: Kyushu 1970 had 4 rikishi from Hanakago-beya among 9 participants in the Makushita playoff , and the very big 11-rikishi Sandanme playoff in Aki 1964 featured even 5 rikishi from Kasugano-beya.

Also noteworthy: That Kyushu 1970 tournament not only had 4 Hanakago rikishi in makushita, but also 3 Kasugano guys in sandanme. And even more weirdly, the Hatsu 1974 sandanme playoff had 3 rikishi from both Futagoyama and Kasugano among the 10 participants.

Another odd bit happened in Haru and Natsu 1957, which both featured a Tokitsukaze trio in back-to-back sandanme playoffs.

It's probably just random noise, but these triple appearances have disproportionately come in Fukuoka (7 of 19), and sure enough we're in Kyushu again now...

And coming back to this basho, sadly Oisato put a needle into our dream bubble, beating fellow low sandanme returnee Kototaiki. The other two Sadogatake rikishi will try to avenge him in the tomoe-sen on senshuraku. :-)

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Another question for the experts regarding sanyaku promotion: assuming one sekiwake spot opens and Goeido keeps his rank, will the this likely be occupied by the higher finishing komusubi (assuming at least one KKs) or Tochinoshin if they each go 8-7, even if Ikioi finishes with something like 12-3?

I'm not really sure how things work in cases like this where a rikishi several ranks down has significantly more wins.

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