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Akinomaki

Goeido has won a tournament

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A one day tournament only, but even this one as the first Japanese for 12 years.
The 74th All-Japan rikishi championships, beating Ichinojo in the final, who won against Kisenosato in the quarters. Endo and Kotoyuki were in the top 4.
Kakuryu (with shoulder problems) and Kotoshogiku lost their first bout, the other 2 yokozuna and Terunofuji were of course kyujo.
Toyohibiki won the juryo tournament.
http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/news/2015/10/05/kiji/K20151005011266030.html
kmr-bt-goeido1745-20151005-w500_0.jpg

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Edited by Akinomaki
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I hope there'll be some videos on YouTube. Wish I knew Japanese.

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Some pictures from the event.

Meiji01.jpg

Jinku performance from Kotoninsei, Daishowaka, Daishokaku, Daitenpaku, Tsurunoumi and Yuki.

Meiji02_Jinku.jpg

Shokkiri next, with the comedy stylings of Onomatsu-beya duo Shinohara and Wakayama, and Shikimori Kazuki.

Meiji03_Shokkiri.jpg

Meiji04_Shokkiri.jpg

Meiji05_Shokkiri.jpg

Meiji06_Shokkiri.jpg

Meiji07_Shokkiri.jpg

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Meiji09_Shokkiri.jpg

Before everyone heads off on the autumn jungyo, the Kyokai took the opportunity to get a few new profile pictures for rikishi including Arawashi and Mitakeumi.

Meiji10_Arawashi.jpg

Meiji11_Mitakeumi.jpg

Ikioi and yobidashi Ryuji share a joke backstage.

Meiji12_Ikioi_Ryuji.jpg

Yokozuna Kakuryu's dohyo-iri. [4]

Meiji13_Kakuryu.jpg

Meiji14_Kakuryu.jpg

Meiji15_Kakuryu.jpg

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All of the participating rikishi flank the dohyo as Hakkaku-oyakata (former Yokozuna Hokutoumi) delivers an opening address, continuing to stand in for the ill Rijicho Kitanoumi. [3]

Meiji17_Address.jpg

Meiji18_Address.jpg

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Endo and Ikioi. [2]

Meiji20_Endo.jpg

Meiji21_Ikioi.jpg

Yokozuna Kakuryu recites the oath on behalf of the rikishi.

Meiji22_Oath.jpg

No torikumi pictures unfortunately. Satonofuji performed the yumitori-shiki following the final bout. [3]

Meiji23_Yumitori.jpg

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And finally, it's a Sakaigawa-beya celebration, Makuuchi champion Goeido and Juryo champion Toyohibiki pose for pictures with their yusho certificates.

Meiji26_Winners.jpg

Competition results, no kimarite.

MAKUUCHI

Round 1

Kaisei def. Kakuryu

Kotoyuki def. Aoiyama

Sadanoumi def. Ikioi

Amuru def. Tochiozan

Gagamaru def. Tochinoshin

Takarafuji def. Kitataiki

Chiyotairyu def. Osunaarashi

Goeido def. Tokushoryu

Endo def. Kotoshogiku

Homarefuji def. Sadanofuji

Sokokurai def. Tamawashi

Okinoumi def. Kagamio

Myogiryu def. Toyonoshima

Ichinojo def. Daieisho

Kyokushuho def. Yoshikaze

Kisenosato def. Aminishiki

Round 2

Kotoyuki def. Kaisei

Sadanoumi def. Amuru

Takarafuji def. Gagamaru

Goeido def. Chiyotairyu

Endo def. Homarefuji

Sokokurai def. Okinoumi

Ichinojo def. Myogiryu

Kisenosato def. Kyokushuho

Quarter-finals

Kotoyuki def. Sadanoumi

Goeido def. Takarafuji

Endo def. Sokokurai

Ichinojo def. Kisenosato

Semi-finals

Goeido def. Kotoyuki

Ichinojo def. Endo

Final

Goeido def. Ichinojo

==========================

JURYO

Round 1

Fujiazuma def. Asahisho

Ishiura def. Jokoryu

Kagayaki def. Shodai

Toyohibiki def. Wakanoshima

Onosho def. Arawashi

Mitakeumi def. Kyokutaisei

Akiseyama def. Satoyama

Takanoiwa def. Shohozan

Quarter-finals

Ishiura def. Fujiazuma

Toyohibiki def. Kagayaki

Onosho def. Mitakeumi

Takanoiwa def. Akiseyama

Semi-finals

Toyohibiki def. Ishiura

Takanoiwa def. Onosho

Final

Toyohibiki def. Takanoiwa

And the updated list of winners.

Inaugural winner Tochigiyama was already retired for several months when he won the tournament, which was initially held outdoors at Meiji Jingu. The 1957 edition was cancelled due to rain, after which the tournament was moved to the Kokugikan. The 1988 edition was cancelled due to the deteriorating health of Emperor Hirohito.

1925 - Tochigiyama

1926 - Tsunenohana

1929 - Tsunenohana

1931 - Tamanishiki

1933 - Tamanishiki

1935 - Minanogawa

1937 - Tamanishiki

1939 - Futabayama

1940 - Futabayama

1941 - Nayoroiwa

1942 - Futabayama

1943 - Futabayama

1944-1951 Not held

1952 - Chiyonoyama

1953 - Kagamisato

1954 - Tochinishiki

1955 - Ouchiyama

1956 - Matsunobori

1957 - Not held

1958 - Asashio

1959 - Wakahaguro

1960 - Taiho

1961 - Kashiwado

1962 - Tochinoumi

1963 - Yutakayama Katsuo

1964 - Taiho

1965 - Wakamiyama

1966 - Tamanoshima

1967 - Sadanoyama

1968 - Taiho

1969 - Tamanoshima

1970 - Kitanofuji

1971 - Daikirin

1972 - Yutakayama Hiromitsu

1973 - Wajima

1974 - Kitanoumi

1975 - Onishiki

1976 - Kitanoumi

1977 - Kitanoumi

1978 - Wakanohana II

1979 - Mienoumi

1980 - Takanosato

1981 - Wakanohana II

1982 - Takanosato

1983 - Chiyonofuji

1984 - Asashio

1985 - Asashio

1986 - Chiyonofuji

1987 - Hokutoumi

1988 - Not held

1989 - Chiyonofuji

1990 - Onokuni

1991 - Kirishima

1992 - Akebono

1993 - Akebono

1994 - Akebono

1995 - Musashimaru

1996 - Takanohana

1997 - Wakanohana III

1998 - Takanonami

1999 - Chiyotaikai

2000 - Akebono

2001 - Musashimaru

2002 - Asashoryu

2003 - Chiyotaikai

2004 - Asashoryu

2005 - Kotooshu

2006 - Ama

2007 - Hakuho

2008 - Ama

2009 - Harumafuji

2010 - Baruto

2011 - Kotooshu

2012 - Harumafuji

2013 - Harumafuji

2014 - Kakuryu

2015 - Goeido

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Found a highlight video of the shokkiri shared on Facebook. Who knew that Kakuryu did shokkiri on the side?

https://www.facebook.com/Jrockradio/videos/903520079735195/

How is it that Hakuho has only won once ever, and Harumafuji has won a whopping 5 times? From the looks of it, that's the all-time record, too, beating out Akebono, Chiyonofuji, and Futabayama. Hakuho can go 5-0 in his sleep if he wanted to.

Edit: found the whole video in the comments - https://youtu.be/mdszgf9ncY8

Edited by Seijakuzan

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Goeido sukuinage Ichinojo (final)
smo-goeido-yusho-nt151006-w500_0.jpg

Terunofuji was also at the kokugikan, the photo shoot there was for the sumo calender as well
smo-teru-nt151006-w500_0.jpg

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This starts a yokozuna run for Goeidou, right?

How is it that Hakuho has only won once ever, and Harumafuji has won a whopping 5 times? From the looks of it, that's the all-time record, too, beating out Akebono, Chiyonofuji, and Futabayama. Hakuho can go 5-0 in his sleep if he wanted to.

Because Hakuho is busy winning the tournaments that matter, and doesn't need the extra prize money, anyway. Why tire himself out between basho?

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Last year's thread. The prize is apparently at best $5000, not an insignificant amount to us peons, but especially for Yokozuna, it's not much, and the title is meaningless to Ozumo. They aren't putting much effort into at all.

Edited by Gurowake
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Last year's thread. The prize is apparently at best $5000, not an insignificant amount to us peons, but especially for Yokozuna, it's not much, and the title is meaningless to Ozumo. They aren't putting much effort into at all.

Scanning the list, I don't think a non-Ozeki/Yokozuna has won since 1980 (and Takanosato was an Ozeki a year later) - and there have been plenty of K/S and upper maegashira who can beat an Ozeki/Yok who is running at 80% any day of the week. Doesn't quite pass the smell test for me, unless the upper maegashira don't care either.

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Maegashira and junior sanyaku have to worry about getting hurt more than the senior sanyaku who can take one or more basho off with no rank penalty. The amount of money at stake is just too low for anyone to really care.

Edited by Gurowake

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Maegashira and junior sanyaku have to worry about getting hurt more than the senior sanyaku who can take one or more basho off with no rank penalty. The amount of money at stake is just too low for anyone to really care.

Yet there are always both junior sanyaku as well as senior sanyaku who make it into the last stages, often beating stronger rikishi. So it must be worth the risk and effort to some of them -- even Endo who had a serious injury quite recently. Yet always a yokozuna or ozeki wins. So it's not like noone cares about this tournament.
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I just think the results are somewhat randomized as there's no real motivation behind any of their successes; some are just going to decide to put a little more effort into it than others. Keep in mind also that it's a single-elimination tournament, and not even the best of them manage to win every single bout against weaker rikishi.

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It may be that Hakuho in particular is solely money-focused (why?) and doesn't care, but looking at the number of yokozuna who have bothered to win the tournament, it seems very unlikely that nobody cares.

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Winning this tournament does zilch for your reputation (Doubt this win changes anyone's perception of Goeido as an Oz or most even knew Haramafuji was the record holder). Seems like it is a mandatory event for all non-injured rikishi so while they are there most will at least put up a token effort for the crowds. Guessing if everyone is going half speed and trying to avoid injuries then a more talented (typically higher ranked) wrestler will have a higher chance to win the tournament as they have a higher base.

Edited by Mongolith

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