Gurowake

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3 hours ago, WAKATAKE said:

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Results.aspx?b=202111&d=1

For day 1 of Kyushu 2021, all 14 Juryo ranks are going east vs west straight down the banzuke. J1E vs J1W through J14E vs J14W. When was the last time this happened, or if at all?

Most recently in Aki 2018. Full list for the 14-ranks era (since 2004):

2004.03, 2004.09, 2004.11, 2006.03, 2007.01, 2007.11, 2008.01, 2008.03, 2008.11, 2009.01, 2009.09, 2009.11, 2012.01, 2013.05, 2014.05, 2014.07, 2014.11, 2016.07, 2017.01, 2017.05, 2018.05, 2018.09, 2021.11
 

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Day 1 and Day 2 of Kyushu Basho 2021 both featured two bouts in a row where all four Maegashira involved kept the same rank on the banzuke as in the previous basho (i.e. Tobizaru, Aoiyama, Hidenoumi, Chiyotairyu).

I daresay that's a first.

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Nakabi Kachikoshi streaks

When Terunofuji won on Sunday, he joined a small group of rikishi who have secured a winning record on day 8 across at least four consecutive basho. Only seven men have ever done that in the six-basho-a-year, 15-bouts-a-basho era. If he repeats it in January, he will move into sole third place on the list. 

10: Hakuho*

6: Tamanoumi

4: Tochinishiki, Kitanoumi, Taiho, Asashoryu, Terunofuji

3: Chiyonofuji, Wajima, Wakanohana I, Akebono, Kagamisato, Takanosato

 

Anyone not on the list never managed more than two basho in a row where they got their KK at the earliest opportunity. There are some pretty big names missing, like Takanohana, Harumafuji and Musashimaru.

*Hakuho also had a seven-basho streak but this list includes only PBs. 

Edited by Eikokurai
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2 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

Nakabi Kachikoshi streaks

When Terunofuji won on Sunday, he joined a small group of rikishi who have secured a winning record on day 8 across at least four consecutive basho. Only seven men have ever done that in the six-basho-a-year, 15-bouts-a-basho era. If he repeats it in January, he will move into sole third place on the list. 

10: Hakuho

6: Tamanoumi

4: Tochinishiki, Kitanoumi, Taiho, Asashoryu, Terunofuji

3: Chiyonofuji, Wajima, Wakanohana I, Akebono, Kagamisato, Takanosato

 

Anyone not on the list never managed more than two basho in a row where they got their KK at the earliest opportunity. There are some pretty big names missing, like Takanohana, Harumafuji and Musashimaru.

It is remarkable that we could argue that Hakuho holds also 2nd place here for a 7-basho stint (Hatsu 2011 to Haru 2012, if we consider Natsu 2011 as an actual basho, 6 otherwise)

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36 minutes ago, Nantonoyama said:

, if we consider Natsu 2011 as an actual basho, 6 otherwise)

The yusho from that counts as one of Hakuho's 45, so I think we can.

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6 hours ago, Nantonoyama said:

It is remarkable that we could argue that Hakuho holds also 2nd place here for a 7-basho stint (Hatsu 2011 to Haru 2012, if we consider Natsu 2011 as an actual basho, 6 otherwise)

Yes, you’re right. I should have been clearer that the list was each rikishi’s personal best. Asashoryu managed 4 twice, but I counted only one. 

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Kagayaki en route to tying the record of consecutive MK as Maegashira and probably setting a new one in January.

 

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Courtesy of NSK's broadcast: Terunofuji, Mitakeumi, and Meisei are the only three rikishi to record KK in all basho this year thus far. Terunofuji and Mitakeumi are in for the sweep, although Meisei still has his work cut out for him.

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6 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

Courtesy of NSK's broadcast: Terunofuji, Mitakeumi, and Meisei are the only three rikishi to record KK in all basho this year thus far. Terunofuji and Mitakeumi are in for the sweep, although Meisei still has his work cut out for him.

So, Terunofuji, "Inconsistent-San" and Meisei? Hmmm ...

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33 minutes ago, Yamanashi said:

So, Terunofuji, "Inconsistent-San" and Meisei? Hmmm ...

More, like, "Mr Can't-Get-It-Up(ranked)". 18 straight sanyaku/sekiwake, or whatever the relevant stat is, is anything but inconsistent.

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He's very good at getting 8 or 9 wins.

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3 hours ago, Gurowake said:

He's very good at getting 8 or 9 wins.

... in Sanyaku.

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4 hours ago, Gurowake said:

He's very good at getting 8 or 9 wins.

Sounds like the standard ozeki to me.

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As one might expect, the number of Yusho won by each rank overall in history decreases for the most part as one goes down the banzuke.  There's like 300 Yokozuna yusho, 100 Ozeki yusho, 30 Sekiwake Yusho, 9 Komusubi Yusho, and smaller single digits for M1, M2, and M3, the last of which was just Tochinoshin.  But there have been 5 Yusho won from M4!  Now you might say, for many stretches of history, M4 was the highest rank that might avoid all the top ranked rikishi, and so maybe it would be expected.  But for those 5 Yusho, the winners faced all the Yokozuna, Ozeki, and Sekiwake that they could have.  A few didn't face the Komusubi, and while I didn't check to see why, that kind of thing happens a lot because by the time they would face Komusubi, it's deep into the Yusho race and the Komusubi are not doing particularly well.  Now, their Maegashira opponents were in general weaker than the rest of the joi, but the fall off in quality is steepest at the top, and often the strongest maegashira are not ranked as such, so it's not like they faced all that weaker competition.  So it's just a bit of random noise, and not from the cause one might expect.  The rest of the maegashira ranks winning Yusho is just random noise as well, with a couple pockets of no Yusho with 1-3 for most ranks.  The 3 won by M17 is somewhat high considering there have been less of them than other ranks by a significant margin, but it's only 180 vs. 300 M16, so a weird bit of a bump, but really just more random noise.

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Looking through the Day 13 (Kyushu 2021) torikumi and noticed Tochikamiyama vs. Tokunomusashi…

Made me wonder what matchup had the most combined letters in the romanizations of the participant’s shikona.

The aforementioned match has 26.

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With a couple random searches, the longest I've found is 28: Kotohigashiyama vs Wakayoshimura, and Kotohigashiyama vs Tatsumuramoto

Tochikamiyama vs Tokunomusashi also faced each other in 2015 as amateurs, with the title of middle school yokozuna on the line. Back then it was just Tokuda vs Kamiyama, a relatively measly 14 letters!

 

Edited by Katooshu
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Yeah, we did this already a few years ago. ;-)

On 21/01/2018 at 04:11, Asashosakari said:
On 21/01/2018 at 03:37, Yukiarashi said:

I don't know how these records would be kept, but Wakatomoharu-Takayoshitoshi had to break some kind of letters record in a bout.

12 vs 14? Nowhere near. ;-) As far as bouts covered by the DB go, the maximum appears to be 28 in 13 vs 15 and 14 vs 14 matchups.

 

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It's a shame we never got a Kotohigashiyama vs Takachihonomine 30 letter super match

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12 hours ago, Kyokufuji said:

Looking through the Day 13 (Kyushu 2021) torikumi and noticed Tochikamiyama vs. Tokunomusashi…

Made me wonder what matchup had the most combined letters in the romanizations of the participant’s shikona.

The aforementioned match has 26.


That was the second 26-letter bout of the basho in fact, following this one on the opening day. If only Agazumazakura hadn't changed his shikona from Shiraishizakura, it would've been 28.

The longest romaji shikona I've seen in the database is a stonking 17 letters, Yatsushironishiki.

Edited by Yubinhaad
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12 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

The longest romaji shikona I've seen in the database is a stonking 17 letters, Yatsushironishiki.

Let Kintamayama take a look.  He can probably find one with a major surplus of "u"'s

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1 hour ago, Yubinhaad said:

 

The longest romaji shikona I've seen in the database is a stonking 17 letters, Yatsushironishiki.

Sounds like we need a Tochiyutakanishiki to beat that.  Nishiki is probably going to be the longest single kanji unless kagayaki ever gets used as a component (which seems unlikely), and yutaka is the next-longest I can think of before the usual 5 romaji kanji.

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14 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

Nishiki is probably going to be the longest single kanji unless kagayaki ever gets used as a component (which seems unlikely)

...just as unlikely as Sakigake.

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