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Posted (edited)

So which heya has the most rikishi? There are 659 (11 less than last basho) rikishi in 42 heyas listed on the new Nagoya Banzuke.. List of 20 or more rikishi heyas:

1. Hakkaku,  30

2. Kokonoe, 28

3, Kise and Takasago with  26

5.Sakaigawa and Tamanoi 25

7. Sadogatake who were 2nd last basho, dropped to 7th place with 24 this basho after a lot of retirements.

8. Takadagawa, 22

9. Oitekaze, 20

 

Heyas with the least rikishi:

Kagamiyama (2)

Nishikido  (4)

Kataonami (5)

 

Sekitori numbers:

7 - Oitekaze- (5 Makuuchi, 2 Juryo)

5- Kokonoe (5 Makuuchi), Kise (4,1),  Isegahama (3,2) 

4- Tokiwayama (2-2)

 
Edited by Kintamayama
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Kintamayama said:

Sekitori numbers:

7 - Oitekaze- (5 Makuuchi, 2 Juryo)

5- Kokonoe (5 Makuuchi), Kise (4,1),  Isegahama (3,2) 

 

Wow, two heya, each with 5 rikishi in makuuchi. That accounts for almost a quarter of the makuuchi ranks!

Edited by Kaminariyuki

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19 hours ago, Kaminariyuki said:

 

Wow, two heya, each with 5 rikishi in makuuchi. That accounts for almost a quarter of the makuuchi ranks!

Bit of a revolving door with Kokonoe though. The chances of Chiyono, Chiyomaru and Chiyoshoma staving off demotion to juryo and Chiyonokuni avoiding another kyujo are fairly slim in the short term. Chiyotairyu is arguably the only makuuchi mainstay they have right now. 

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Perhaps the even more interesting trivia about Kokonoe-beya is that this is the first time in over ten years that they don't have anybody ranked in juryo after Chiyonoo's promotion and both Chiyonoumi and Chiyootori sent down to makushita.

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Not sure if it qualifies as interesting enough, but should Terunofuji secure the rope, this will leave no Mongolian wrestler whose highest rank was Ozeki. The only other "rank" which has this distinction is jonokuchi.

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Posted (edited)

Jonokuchi rikishi taking a four-day break without kyujo, since 1989:

Basho    Rikishi              Break    Catch-up
1990.11  Jk40w Takahashi       3-6    (1-2,7-8)
1992.07  Jk66e Imamura        10-13     14-15
1993.09  Jk58w Yakaze          2-5      11-12
1994.05  Jk65w Osada           8-11     13/15
1995.11  Jk58e Kagemaru        2-5      13-14
1998.07  Jk50e Watatani        2-5       9-10
1998.11  Jk47w Nagayama        4-7       9-10
1998.11  Jk48e Tatsuyutaka    10-13     14-15
2000.11  Jk37e Sato            6-9      13-14
2001.09  Jk41w Daishochi       8-11     13-14
2002.07  Jk48e Kohakuzan       8-11     13-14
2003.05  Jk42w Nakane          2-5       7-8
2006.07  Jk40w Hata            2-5       7-8
2009.03  Jk30e Nagai           2-5      11-12
2010.11  Jk26e Motoyama        6-9      11-12
2013.05  Jk24w Terumichi       2-5      11-12
2014.07  Jk26w Nakayama        4-7       9-10
2014.09  Jk22e Kisenosho       6-9      13-14
2014.11  Jk20w Yamauchi        8-11     13-14
2017.09  Jk27w Urutora         4-7      13-14
2019.07  Jk32e Yamane         10-13     14-15
2020.07  Jk37e Kaihiryu        4-7       9-10
2021.07  Jk24w Shonanzakura    2-5       ?

The first case on the list is an artifact of something they stopped doing after 1992 - making torikumi with an odd number of participants work by giving somebody two matches in one round and then leaving him out of the next round, rather than leaving him off first and then catching him up later. Nowadays they only use the latter approach, back then they did both interchangeably.

Edited by Asashosakari
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2 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

Jonokuchi rikishi taking a four-day break without kyujo, since 1989:

Basho    Rikishi              Break    Catch-up
1990.11  Jk40w Takahashi       3-6    (1-2,7-8)
1992.07  Jk66e Imamura        10-13     14-15
1993.09  Jk58w Yakaze          2-5      11-12
1994.05  Jk65w Osada           8-11     13/15
1995.11  Jk58e Kagemaru        2-5      13-14
1998.07  Jk50e Watatani        2-5       9-10
1998.11  Jk47w Nagayama        4-7       9-10
1998.11  Jk48e Tatsuyutaka    10-13     14-15
2000.11  Jk37e Sato            6-9      13-14
2001.09  Jk41w Daishochi       8-11     13-14
2002.07  Jk48e Kohakuzan       8-11     13-14
2003.05  Jk42w Nakane          2-5       7-8
2006.07  Jk40w Hata            2-5       7-8
2009.03  Jk30e Nagai           2-5      11-12
2010.11  Jk26e Motoyama        6-9      11-12
2013.05  Jk24w Terumichi       2-5      11-12
2014.07  Jk26w Nakayama        4-7       9-10
2014.09  Jk22e Kisenosho       6-9      13-14
2014.11  Jk20w Yamauchi        8-11     13-14
2017.09  Jk27w Urutora         4-7      13-14
2019.07  Jk32e Yamane         10-13     14-15
2020.07  Jk37e Kaihiryu        4-7       9-10
2021.07  Jk24w Shonanzakura    2-5       ?

The first case on the list is an artifact of something they stopped doing after 1992 - making torikumi with an odd number of participants work by giving somebody two matches in one round and then leaving him out of the next round, rather than leaving him off first and then catching him up later. Nowadays they only use the latter approach, back then they did both interchangeably.

I can explain at least one of these cases: Yamane (7/2019) needed extra recuperation time after defeating Hattorizakura on day 9.

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Abi's fusensho win over Tochimaru marks for a strange rivalry. Both times they have been scheduled to face each other, Abi has won both times by fusensho. How many times have we had this happen where two people have been scheduled to fight at least two times and both or all ended in fusen?

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_opp.aspx?r=12094&r2=11965

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On 10/07/2021 at 03:32, WAKATAKE said:

Abi's fusensho win over Tochimaru marks for a strange rivalry. Both times they have been scheduled to face each other, Abi has won both times by fusensho. How many times have we had this happen where two people have been scheduled to fight at least two times and both or all ended in fusen?

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_opp.aspx?r=12094&r2=11965

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&kimarite=74&shikona1=Rikidozan&shikona2=Maedayama

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&kimarite=74&shikona1=dewanishiki&shikona2=azumafuji

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On 14/06/2021 at 07:17, Yamanashi said:

Just to exhaust the whole up-from-Juryo data for those awaiting with bated breath(Detective...):

Rank    W      L       %

J1      250   244   50.6

J2      229   204   52.9

J3      166   155   51.7

J4        69      66   51.1

J5        11      19   36.7

J6        12        7   63.2

J7          1        3   25.0

J8          3        2   60.0

total  741   700   51.4

... essentially, equality (2000 to present).

I wouldn't call this equality. At this volume 51.4% is a small, but pretty clear advantage. Looking into the full basho records of the involved parties I'd say that the makuuchi rikishi are doing actually better than expected (from the full basho records), and the explanation for this should be simply that low makuuchi (the other opponents for the makuuchi sides in the full basho records) in general is a bit stronger than high juryo (the other opponents for the juryo sides).

Oh, these full basho records are 8900-12593 (41.4%) for makuuchi sides and 11604-9856 (54.1%) for the juryo sides. Of course a good explanation of this disparity also is that these rikishi are selected for inter-divisional matchups because of their records in the first place.

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Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, Doitsuyama said:

I wouldn't call this equality. At this volume 51.4% is a small, but pretty clear advantage. Looking into the full basho records of the involved parties I'd say that the makuuchi rikishi are doing actually better than expected (from the full basho records), and the explanation for this should be simply that low makuuchi (the other opponents for the makuuchi sides in the full basho records) in general is a bit stronger than high juryo (the other opponents for the juryo sides).

Oh, these full basho records are 8900-12593 (41.4%) for makuuchi sides and 11604-9856 (54.1%) for the juryo sides. Of course a good explanation of this disparity also is that these rikishi are selected for inter-divisional matchups because of their records in the first place.

Thanks for the call-back!  I meant math equality; if the ranking system is rigidly accurate this is, of course, puzzling.  However, I agree that the hot rikishi will have better statistics even if the mental barrier of "sekitori" exists.  Adding the (fact? assumption?) that these are sometimes "replacement matches" makes things even less predictable by rank alone.

Edited by Yamanashi

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Last time we had multiple unbeaten makuuchi rikichi after day...

5, 6: 2021.01

7: 2020.11

8, 9: 2020.07

10: 2018.09

11: 2016.05

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2 hours ago, Atenzan said:

Last time we had multiple unbeaten makuuchi rikichi after day...

The followup to this is, rare as it may be to have a yusho lock by say day 12, how equally rare is it that the co-leaders are chased only by people 2 off the pace (and not one immediately behind)?

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Three of the last four tournaments are high up the list of (post-1989) basho with the most rikishi making their makushita debuts: Link

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Hakuho seems to top the list of kōhai yokozuna outlasted (i.e. yokozuna promoted after Hakuho and retired before him) at 3. For comparison:

 

Shikona

Bashos at Yokozuna

Junior Yokozuna outlasted

Hakuho

83

3 (Harumafuji, Kakuryu, Kisenosato)

Kitanoumi

63

2 (Wakanohana II, Mienoumi)

Chiyonofuji

59

2 (Takanosato, Futahaguro)

Taiho

58

2 (Tochinoumi, Sadanoyama)

Takanohana

49

1 (Wakanohana III)

 

 

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And he might still have time to squeeze in a fourth...

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Benevolance said:

And he might still have time to squeeze in a fourth...

He won't outlast Terunofuji unless something goes spectacularly off plan for either man here. Despite rumours of Isegahama having a new foreign recruit (and hence implying that Terunofuji will be gone within a year, possibly setting a new record for shortest yokozuna tenure in the modern era, because that's the grace period for the foreign recruit orientation or whatever they call it), he still has yet to obtain Japanese citizenship. I highly doubt Hakuho intends on sticking around till the end of the year, let alone till this time next year.

Edited by Seiyashi

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8 hours ago, Kamitsuumi said:

Hakuho seems to top the list of kōhai yokozuna outlasted (i.e. yokozuna promoted after Hakuho and retired before him) at 3. For comparison:

 

Shikona

Bashos at Yokozuna

Junior Yokozuna outlasted

Hakuho

83

3 (Harumafuji, Kakuryu, Kisenosato)

Kitanoumi

63

2 (Wakanohana II, Mienoumi)

Chiyonofuji

59

2 (Takanosato, Futahaguro)

Taiho

58

2 (Tochinoumi, Sadanoyama)

Takanohana

49

1 (Wakanohana III)

 

 

Akebono was promoted before Wakanohana and retired after him also

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9 hours ago, Kamitsuumi said:

Hakuho seems to top the list of kōhai yokozuna outlasted (i.e. yokozuna promoted after Hakuho and retired before him) at 3

He even outlasted one of his own recruits that made it to Makuuchi! http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi.aspx?r=11989

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Posted (edited)

Cases of leading by four wins in Makunouchi (including joint leads)

Basho   Wins  Leader(s)               Runner-ups  Since Day   Runner-ups
197107  15    Tamanoumi               1                       
197305  15    Wajima                  4                       
197309  15    Wajima                  2                       
198101  14    Kitanoumi,Chiyonofuji   7                       
198405  15    Kitanoumi               2                       
198407  15    Wakashimazu             1                       
198501  15    Chiyonofuji             3                       
198909  15    Chiyonofuji             1           14          2
199609  15    Takanohana              3                       
200101  14    Musashimaru,Takanohana  4                       
200501  15    Asashoryu               2           13          6
200807  15    Hakuho                  1           14          3
200903  15    Hakuho                  2                       
201007  15    Hakuho                  3                       
201303  15    Hakuho                  2           14          2
201501  15    Hakuho                  3                       

Edit: To be honest, I've only investigated final standings because everything else would be too hard to query. So if Hakuho and Terunofuji really *did* lead by four on day 13 of 202107, it wouldn't show up here because there won't be a four wins lead on senshuraku.

Edited by Jakusotsu
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Don't know if this has been mentioned: IF they give Terunofuji the rope, he would be the first in the 6bpye (didn't check further back) to be promoted to Y only two basho after Ozprom.

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