Gurowake

Trivia bits

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9 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

I have no idea how one would research for this easily, but I suspect Akiseyama may be the oldest rikishi to reach a career high rank, at least in any time period that's sufficiently modern.  I don't think there are any Ozeki or Yokozuna promotions of anyone that old in any modern time, and most guys who are that old in the top division have been up and down it many times.

I immediately thought of Hoshiiwato, who took a record 115 tournaments to reach makuuchi, but he was 34 at the time and Akiseyama is will be 36 in July. 

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11 hours ago, Gurowake said:

I have no idea how one would research for this easily, but I suspect Akiseyama may be the oldest rikishi to reach a career high rank, 35 years, 8 months, at least in any time period that's sufficiently modern.  I don't think there are any Ozeki or Yokozuna promotions of anyone that old in any modern time, and most guys who are that old in the top division have been up and down it many times.

Closest I can think of recently: Yoshikaze to Sekiwake at 33 and 10 months, Hatsu 2016.

EDIT: Takekaze even closer: Sekiwake at 35 years, 3 months, Aki 2014

Is Kotozakura the oldest yokozuna promotee at 32 years+?

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, rhyen said:

Is Kotozakura the oldest yokozuna promotee at 32 years+?

Post 1958, yes. Of course there were older ones than that historically. Kimenzan Tanigoro was "promoted" at age 43. 

Edited by ryafuji
scare quotes

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On 25/03/2021 at 06:11, Oshirokita said:
On 25/03/2021 at 06:02, Eikokurai said:

With Kakuryu gone and the possibility of Hakuho not being too far behind, with nobody yet stepping into their shoes, I started wondering if we’ve seen our last kinboshi for a while. It got me thinking, what’s the longest spell without any Maegashira beating a Yokozuna, both with Yokozuna on the banzuke and without?

There has been at least 1 kinboshi every year from 1988 to 2020 except for 2011.

So, for Heisei to present, the longest gap I know of is between Day 2 Kyushu 2010 Kisenosato d. Hakuho.

Next was Day 7 Natsu 2012 Toyohibiki d. Hakuho.


Sorry for a rather late reply, I didn't see these posts until the thread came back up today. According to my files, the longest periods without any kinboshi are as follows:

1931 Haru, Day 4 (Yamanishiki defeated Miyagiyama)  to  1933 Haru, Day 1 (Dewagatake defeated Tamanishiki)

80 honbasho days passed during this kinboshi-less spell which straddled the turmoil of the Shunjuen incident, but kinboshi weren't possible for much of it. Having given up four kinboshi in the opening four days, 36-year-old Miyagiyama fought and defeated three more Maegashira but retired after the basho to leave no Yokozuna on the banzuke until Tamanishiki's promotion.

 

1992 Haru, Day 2 (Kushimaumi defeated Hokutoumi)  to  1993 Haru, Day 6 (Kyokudozan defeated Akebono)

A similar situation occurred in the early 1990s, Hokutoumi's final kinboshi preceded his retirement and began a spell of 93 honbasho days without kinboshi. Again, there were no Yokozuna until Akebono's promotion, and he managed to beat four Maegashira before giving up his first kinboshi.

 

2010 Kyushu, Day 2 (Kisenosato defeated Hakuho)  to  2012 Natsu, Day 7 (Toyohibiki defeated Hakuho)

Unlike the earlier stints, this period of 124 honbasho days saw Hakuho ever-present. After Kisenosato put an end to his overall winning streak attempt, the lone Yokozuna repelled an astonishing 61 Maegashira opponents before Toyohibiki's greatest moment brought that streak to an end too.

 

2020 July, Day 1 (Endo defeated Kakuryu)  to  ?

With Kakuryu gone and Hakuho expected to sit out the Natsu basho, the current kinboshi-less stint will extend to 89 honbasho days, during which the latter has so far defeated 10 Maegashira opponents.

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8 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

While I'm in the thread, here's a minor trivia question:

This bout is unique in the last 30 years. Why?

Any hints?

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12 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

While I'm in the thread, here's a minor trivia question:

This bout is unique in the last 30 years. Why?

Youngest vs oldest on the banzuke? Just a guess given their DOB's.

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8 minutes ago, Karasukurai said:

Youngest vs oldest on the banzuke? Just a guess given their DOB's.


Correct! (Applauding...)

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2 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:
10 minutes ago, Karasukurai said:

Youngest vs oldest on the banzuke? Just a guess given their DOB's.


Correct! (Applauding...)

Wow. You mean with Hanakaze around, that bout still hasn't been displaced from the annals of uniqueness?

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Seiyashi said:

Wow. You mean with Hanakaze around, that bout still hasn't been displaced from the annals of uniqueness?

It's got nothing to do with Hanakaze (or Ichinoya) though; there's always a youngest and an oldest rikishi on the banzuke. The difficult part is for these two specific rikishi to be ranked sufficiently close to each other.


Edit: Okay, "nothing to do" overstates the case. Of course it helps when the oldest guy is ranked way down the banzuke.

Edited by Asashosakari

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1 minute ago, Asashosakari said:

It's got nothing to do with Hanakaze (or Ichinoya) though; there's always a youngest and an oldest rikishi on the banzuke. The difficult part is for these two specific rikishi to be ranked sufficiently close to each other.

Yeah no I mean we've got him doddering around on the lower part of the banzuke for a while now, surely the youngest punk - one of Naruto's or Isegahama's fast risers - has fought him by now. Wow!

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First time in 21 years that all five sanyaku members had a kachikoshi.

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1 hour ago, Kintamayama said:

First time in 21 years that all five sanyaku members had a kachikoshi.

*lower sanyaku, Shirley?

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8 hours ago, Jejima said:

*lower sanyaku, Shirley?

The age old argument of what is sanyaku.. The article says sanyaku. I'm just the translator..

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First time ever that a returning Ozeki returns with a yusho since the return rule was established back in 1969.

First time ever that someone had three yushos while ranked  Sekiwake or under.

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Kintamayama said:

First time ever that a returning Ozeki returns with a yusho since the return rule was established back in 1969.

Is this referring to the 10 wins as Ozekiwake rule? I guess it's true but not greatly relevant to Terunofuji.

Edited by Seiyashi

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10 minutes ago, Seiyashi said:

Is this referring to the 10 wins as Ozekiwake rule? I guess it's true but not greatly relevant to Terunofuji.

Yes.

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Hakuhou is set to become the first rikishi with two separate reigns as the sole yokozuna on the banzuke.

List of such reigns:

1. Nishinoumi I // 1890.05-1896.01

2. Konishiki I // 1896.05-1901.01

3. Oozutsu // 1901.05-1903.05

4. Miyagiyama // 1931.01-1931.03

5. Tamanishiki // 1933.01-1935.05

6. Taihou // 1969.09-1970.01

7. Kitanofuji // 1971.11-1973.01

8. Chiyonofuji // 1986.03-1986.07

9. Hokutoumi // 1992.03-1992.05

10. Akebono // 1993.03-1994.11

11. Asashouryuu // 2004.01-2007.05

12. Hakuhou // 2010.03-2012.09

13. Hakuhou (2) // 2021.05-

That is to say, Hakuhou's yokozuna tenure has not only outlasted his sole predecessor's, but has enveloped the entirety of those of the three next rikishi to gain the rank.

 

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I'd been sitting on that post since Harumafuji retired.

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4 hours ago, Atenzan said:

I'd been sitting on that post since Harumafuji retired.

You can blame Kakuryu for making you wait so long.

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6 hours ago, Atenzan said:

I'd been sitting on that post since Harumafuji retired.

Hey now, there's an off-hand comment I made back in 2014 about a potential bit of trivia for which I'm still waiting for the guy in question to finish his career so it becomes true. ;-)

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1 hour ago, Asashosakari said:

Hey now, there's an off-hand comment I made back in 2014 about a potential bit of trivia for which I'm still waiting for the guy in question to finish his career so it becomes true. ;-)

Toyohibiki?

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On 28/03/2021 at 00:33, Gurowake said:

I have no idea how one would research for this easily, but I suspect Akiseyama may be the oldest rikishi to reach a career high rank, 35 years, 8 months, at least in any time period that's sufficiently modern.  I don't think there are any Ozeki or Yokozuna promotions of anyone that old in any modern time, and most guys who are that old in the top division have been up and down it many times.

Closest I can think of recently: Yoshikaze to Sekiwake at 33 and 10 months, Hatsu 2016.

EDIT: Takekaze even closer: Sekiwake at 35 years, 3 months, Aki 2014

The record since 1909 actually is Kasachikara, believe it or not. He had his 41st birthday on day 4 of his ultimately career high ranked basho. Other than him and Sawaisamu, there is only Wakakuma after World War II who beats Akiseyama. But after that it is really, really close (also for the salaried ranks record) as Ononishiki was only a few days younger than Akiseyama at his highest rank basho. Too bad that Akiseyama fell from 7-6 to 7-8...

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