Gurowake

Trivia bits

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1 hour ago, Yamanashi said:

Sorry if this is old, I can't find any note of it:  both Takamiyama (Haru 1974) and Takamisakari (Nagoya 2003) have won 2 kinboshi in the same basho. 

Has anyone won more?

A lot more than just those two won two kinboshi in the same tournament.

As to more, yes, on several occasions a rikishi got 3 kinboshi in the same tournament.  They are the ones in this query that didn't have any wins by fusen.

Edited by Gurowake
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16 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

A lot more than just those two won two kinboshi in the same tournament.

As to more, yes, on several occasions a rikishi got 3 kinboshi in the same tournament.  They are the ones in this query that didn't have any wins by fusen.

And Asashio’s three-kinboshi tournament was followed immediately by a two-kinboshi tournament. That was quite the spell! A bit of bad banzuke luck at missing out on the sanyaku promotion after his 8-7 at M1e was made a little better.

Edited by Eikokurai

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Thanks for the work! (in hindsight, I should have figured that out for myself).  The trick is to have multiple Yokozuna in a basho, isn't it?  You can't get three kinboshi if there's only one Y.

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17 minutes ago, Yamanashi said:

The trick is to have multiple Yokozuna in a basho, isn't it?

Ye good olde tymes with more than 2 Yokozuna...

 

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Sasshunada-Hakuryu in 1985 is the only matchup to have taken place in juryo in all six basho of a calendar year and be won by the same rikishi all six times.


(Inspired by Tobizaru possibly going for 5-0 against Sokokurai in a few minutes. Oddly enough Sokokurai is at the center of these for 2019 - he's 4-0 against Hidenoumi right now, and was 4-0 against Gagamaru before losing to him in their 5th encounter on Day 3.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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I didn't want to debase the news thread with profane trivia talk, so it goes in here: Would Kakuryu be the first modern era yokozuna to be forced into a heya change? The only other one (not counting mere name changes) that I've been able to find was Futabayama, and he did so willingly to set up his own place. Not sure if I've overlooked something though.

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Sd75e Suzuki is two wins away from becoming the first rikishi to have successive records of 4-3, 5-2, 6-1, 7-0.

He is the 160th toriteki to be a zensho away from achieving this, and all his predecessors have failed

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5 hours ago, Atenzan said:

Sd75e Suzuki is two wins away from becoming the first rikishi to have successive records of 4-3, 5-2, 6-1, 7-0.

He is the 160th toriteki to be a zensho away from achieving this, and all his predecessors have failed

Lost to Sadanohikari today. Sic transit gloria mundi. 

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On ‎16‎/‎09‎/‎2019 at 18:20, Asashosakari said:

I didn't want to debase the news thread with profane trivia talk, so it goes in here: Would Kakuryu be the first modern era yokozuna to be forced into a heya change? The only other one (not counting mere name changes) that I've been able to find was Futabayama, and he did so willingly to set up his own place. Not sure if I've overlooked something though.

I think he would be, yes. Kitanofuji moved from Dewanoumi to Kokonoe when he was ozeki but that was three years before his promotion to yokozuna.

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All toriteki matchups between rikishi with sanyaku experience:

1979.09.09 Ms8w (S) Kotokaze* [4-0] Ms1w (K) Oshio
1987.05.08 Ms3e (K) Oshio [3-0] Ms8e (S) Hoo*
1989.07.05 Ms8e (S) Tochiakagi* [1-1] Ms6w (S) Hoo
1989.09.11 Ms3e (S) Tochiakagi* [1-4] Ms10e (S) Hoo
2017.11.04 Ms14e (K) Jokoryu* [1-0] Ms13w (S) Toyonoshima
2019.09.11 Ms27e (O) Terunofuji* [5-0] Ms7w (K) Chiyootori

[ ] = records before match
* = winner

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Tamawashi is all time leader in fusensho - 12 in makuuchi, 13 in all. Juryo Kaisei is now overall joint no 2. with  11, on day 8 he pulled even with Dewanishiki (who had them all in makuuchi). http://www.nikkansports.com/battle/column/sumo/news/201909160000088.html

201909160000088-w200_0.jpg

the article doesn't not mentioned if the data are maybe only for sekitori default wins, so we can assume that it is really overall

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9 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

the article doesn't not mentioned if the data are maybe only for sekitori default wins, so we can assume that it is really overall

Which complies with the Doitsubase: http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&group_by=rikishi1&having=8&kimarite=74&onlyw1=on

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I should make some deliberate errors in the database, then I'd know if the newspapers get the stats from it. :-D

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Enho has never lost to a rikishi whose highest rank is less than Juryo -- except for Murata (Ms1), who just won the Jonokuchi Yusho after six bashos out of action.

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1 hour ago, Yamanashi said:

Enho has never lost to a rikishi whose highest rank is less than Juryo -- except for Murata (Ms1), who just won the Jonokuchi Yusho after six bashos out of action.

That seems both a bit obfuscated (Takanofuji and Churanoumi hadn't been sekitori yet when they beat him) and not very unusual for those who go through the toriteki ranks quickly. Checking the first guy that came to mind, Tochiozan also had only one loss on the way up against a rikishi who was never sekitori before or after.

Edit: Tokitenku also had just one, and he even had a makekoshi on the way up.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Most consecutive makuuchi yusho won by all different rikishi:

8 1990.11 - 1992.01 (Y Chiyonofuji, O Kirishima, Y Hokutoumi, Y Asahifuji, M13 Kotofuji, M5 Kotonishiki, O Konishiki, M2 Takahanada)

7 / 7 1956.05 - 1958.01 (O Wakanohana, Y Kagamisato, Y Chiyonoyama, S Asashio, K Annenyama, Y Tochinishiki, M14 Tamanoumi, O Wakanohana)

6 1928.01 - 1929.03 (O Hitachiiwa, O Noshirogata, Y Tsunenohana, Y Miyagiyama, S Tamanishiki, O Toyokuni)
6 1953.01 - 1954.03 (O Kagamisato, O Tochinishiki, M6 Tokitsuyama, Y Azumafuji, O Yoshibayama, O Mitsuneyama)
6 1972.01 - 1972.11 (M5 Tochiazuma, S Hasegawa, S Wajima, M4 Takamiyama, Y Kitanofuji, O Kotozakura)
6+ 2018.11 - 2019.09+ (K Takakeisho, S Tamawashi, Y Hakuho, M8 Asanoyama, Y Kakuryu, S Mitakeumi)

Edited by Asashosakari
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2 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

That seems both a bit obfuscated (Takanofuji and Churanoumi hadn't been sekitori yet when they beat him) and not very unusual for those who go through the toriteki ranks quickly. Checking the first guy that came to mind, Tochiozan also had only one loss on the way up against a rikishi who was never sekitori before or after.

Edit: Tokitenku also had just one, and he even had a makekoshi on the way up.

What made me think this worthy of trivia (vs. Greatest Feats of Sumo!!) is the timeliness of the Murata connection.

Incidentally, Jokoryu lost to a (non-sekitori HR) 39 basho after his Hatsu Dohyu.

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A new all-time* record has been set for the size of a sanyaku with rikishi from all different stables.

1932.02   7
1932.03   7
1933.01   7
1934.01   7                     (+2 >  9)
1968.11           9
1992.01       8
1993.01       8
2004.01           9
2004.07           9             (+3 > 12)
2005.01       8                 (+2 > 10)
2005.03       8                 (+2 > 10)
2005.05       8                 (+8 > 16)
2010.09           9             (+1 > 10)
2014.05           9
2014.11               10
2019.03           9             (+2 > 11)
2019.07               10        (+2 > 12)
2019.09           9             (+1 > 10)
2019.11                    11

The numbers in brackets (if present) indicate how many of the highest-ranked maegashira were also from different stables, so the runaway record holder for that extended stat remains 2005.05 with the top 16 rikishi in total.

* modern era since 1927, to be exact.

Edited by Asashosakari
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On 08/11/2019 at 07:25, Asashosakari said:

A new all-time* record has been set for the size of a sanyaku with rikishi from all different stables.

1932.02   7
1932.03   7
1933.01   7
1934.01   7                     (+2 >  9)
1968.11           9
1992.01       8
1993.01       8
2004.01           9
2004.07           9             (+3 > 12)
2005.01       8                 (+2 > 10)
2005.03       8                 (+2 > 10)
2005.05       8                 (+8 > 16)
2010.09           9             (+1 > 10)
2014.05           9
2014.11               10
2019.03           9             (+2 > 11)
2019.07               10        (+2 > 12)
2019.09           9             (+1 > 10)
2019.11                    11

The numbers in brackets (if present) indicate how many of the highest-ranked maegashira were also from different stables, so the runaway record holder for that extended stat remains 2005.05 with the top 16 rikishi in total.

* modern era since 1927, to be exact.

Riffing off this, Sadogatake-beya had the highest-ranked non-heyagashira in all but two basho from 2005.01 (after Musouyama retired) until 2014.03 (when Kotooushuu retired). It was always Kotooushuu or Kotoshougiku. The two exceptions are the (above-linked) 2010.09 and the Kyushu that followed it. 

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Wakatakakage is the first makuuchi rikishi since Kitanoumi in 1983 to have to withdraw on Day 5 having previously been undefeated:

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Query_bout.aspx?show_form=0&day=5&m=on&kimarite=74&wins1=4&winsopt1=1&onlyl1=on

This got me thinking, who has had even longer winning streaks ended in this unfortunate way?

Day 6: Natsu 2005 Kaio pulled out having been 5-0. Before him, Kashiwado had been 5-0 when he pulled out on Day 6 of Haru 1963.

Day 7: Haguroyama withdrew from Natsu 1952 on 6-0 - interestingly he returned to the tournament later and won 1 more bout, ending up on 7-3-5 (must be very rare for a Yokozuna to re-enter a tournament; I can only think of Takanohana in his retirement basho). Tamanishiki also withdrew on 6-0 in Hatsu 1937.

Day 12: The "glass Yokozuna" Kashiwado again - pulled out on 11-0 in Natsu 1964.

Day 13: Wakanohana had  been 12-0 at Aki 1956 but pulled out with a fever. Attempted to re-enter on Day 15 but withdrew again before his scheduled match so actually finished 12-2-1.

Day 15: The ultimate record - Chiyonofuji couldn't fight on the final day of Haru 1989 due to a shoulder dislocation having gone 14-0. Of course this one wasn't so bad for him as he won the tournament anyway.

 

Edited by ryafuji
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10 hours ago, ryafuji said:

Day 15: The ultimate record - Chiyonofuji couldn't fight on the final day due to a shoulder dislocation having gone 14-0. Of course this one wasn't so bad for him as he won the tournament anyway.

Which basho was that?

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10 hours ago, code_number3 said:

Which basho was that?

Sorry, accidental omission - as chishafuwaka says, March 1989. Only the second time a rikishi has ever withdrawn and still managed to win the yusho - the first was Wajima in Kyushu 1973.

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Number of rikishi co-leading the juryo division prior to Day 15 (15-day era since 1949.05, 403 tournaments to date), and eventual outcome.


8 leaders (1)

1998.05,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)

7 leaders (1)

1962.07, 10-4 (=> 4x 11-4) 36 rikishi in juryo

6 leaders (7)

1974.11,   9-5 (=> 4x 10-5)
1988.07,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
1989.09,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
1999.07,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
2006.05,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
2017.03,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
2019.11, 10-4 (=> ?)

5 leaders (2)

1983.11, 10-4 (=> 3x 11-4)
1996.01,   9-5 (=> 2x 10-5)

4 leaders (9)

1949.05, 10-4 (=> 1x 11-4)
1956.01, 10-4 (=> 2x 11-4) 45 rikishi in juryo
1978.01, 10-4 (=> 2x 11-4)
1982.05, 10-4 (=> 2x 11-4)
1986.11,   9-5 (=> 3x 10-5)
1992.07, 10-4 (=> 2x 11-4)
1995.01, 10-4 (=> 3x 11-4)
1995.07,   9-5 (=> 1x 10-5)
1997.11,   9-5 (=> 2x 10-5)

3 leaders (24)

  • 3 Day 15 winners (3)
  • 2 Day 15 winners (13)
  • 1 Day 15 winner (6)
  • no Day 15 winner (2)

2 leaders (91)

1 leader (268)

  • Yusho was decided; champion won on Day 15 (58)
  • Yusho was decided, champion lost on Day 15 (43)
  • Yusho was undecided, leader won on Day 15 (106)
  • Yusho was undecided, leader lost on Day 15 but won yusho outright anyway (17)
  • Yusho was undecided, leader lost on Day 15 and fell into tie (44)

Bonus trivia: 1994.09 was the only basho in which the Day 14 lead consisted of a single 9-5 rikishi.

Edited by Asashosakari
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