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Many thanks to Gurowake for thoroughly researching the question.  My example was Tochiazuma.  I didn't include Jonokuchi because most good rikishi don't spend much time there, so lack of a Yusho doesn't mean lack of excellence.

 

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In looking for successive basho with Yusho in the Jd-Sd-Ms area, I found only Tosayutaka with three in a row; others with a third Yusho outside the range (Takeuchi, Tochinoshin, Yamazaki in Juryo), and some close calls on their third try : 6-1 in Ms (Asashoryu, Itai, Oyanagi).

Asashoryu (Ms53, later Yok68) lost in a 7-way playoff; his only regular loss during the basho, the one that put him down into the playoffs, was to Wakakaze, who never made it out of Makushita and retired two basho later. 

This stuff is one reason why I love Sumo.

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4 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

In looking for successive basho with Yusho in the Jd-Sd-Ms area, I found only Tosayutaka with three in a row; others with a third Yusho outside the range (Takeuchi, Tochinoshin, Yamazaki in Juryo), and some close calls on their third try : 6-1 in Ms (Asashoryu, Itai, Oyanagi).

Asashoryu (Ms53, later Yok68) lost in a 7-way playoff; his only regular loss during the basho, the one that put him down into the playoffs, was to Wakakaze, who never made it out of Makushita and retired two basho later. 

This stuff is one reason why I love Sumo.

Jokoryu came very close to a run of four yusho in the unsalaried ranks. His loss in a playoff for the jonidan championship cost him that record.

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More than half the west-side rikishi from Ms14 to Ms27 are from Kise-beya. 

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Kisenosato lost the last 7 bouts he actually showed up on the dohyo (day 15 of Aki 2018, days 1-4 of Kyushu 2018 and days 1-2 of Hatsu 2019).

As far as the database goes (early 20th century), only Yokozuna Takanohana lost 7 bouts in a row as a Yokozuna (days 12-15 of Nagoya 1999, days 1-2 of Aki 1999 and day 1 of Kyushu 1999)

If Kisenosato goes on tomorrow he could set a new all-time record-you-do-not-want-to-have

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32 minutes ago, Nantonoyama said:

Kisenosato lost the last 7 bouts he actually showed up on the dohyo (day 15 of Aki 2018, days 1-4 of Kyushu 2018 and days 1-2 of Hatsu 2019).

As far as the database goes (early 20th century), only Yokozuna Takanohana lost 7 bouts in a row as a Yokozuna (days 12-15 of Nagoya 1999, days 1-2 of Aki 1999 and day 1 of Kyushu 1999)

For the sake of comparison, the 7 opponents were,

Kisenosato = 1O, 2K, 4M
Takanohana = 2Y, 1O, 2K, 2M

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Don't think I've ever mentioned this before: Fukuzono

(Prompted by Shuji who is currently four deep into that run.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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Kisenosato hasn't actually beaten anyone on day 13 of a honbasho since March 2016. Since then he's 1-6-9 with a fusensho on the final Friday. 

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And this is a new record. Never had, in recorded history, a Yokozuna lost 8 bouts in a row.

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3 hours ago, Jakusotsu said:

The margin is amazing. Even more considering Takayasu's win and Hakuho day 2 win are really super super lucky ones

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1 hour ago, Nantonoyama said:

The margin is amazing. Even more considering Takayasu's win and Hakuho day 2 win are really super super lucky ones

It's already more than the record for 4 days and they haven't even fought that yet.

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5 hours ago, Nantonoyama said:

The margin is amazing. Even more considering Takayasu's win and Hakuho day 2 win are really super super lucky ones

Which somewhat emphasizes the concept of variance and statistical outliers. With all likelyhood, we won't see a result like this again in our lifetime.

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On 14/01/2019 at 16:46, Asashosakari said:

Don't think I've ever mentioned this before: Fukuzono

(Prompted by Shuji who is currently four deep into that run.)

The reverse of that (the "lightbulb turns on" award?) would be 0-7 to 1-6 etc.

The longest string I can see is 1-6, 2-5, 3-4, 4-3, 5-2; performed by 9 rikishi, the last one Shobushi starting in 11/2016.  How close did any of these guys come to 6-1 in the next basho?  Only one of them even made 5 wins, the aforementioned Shobushi.

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Hokutofuji is only the third sekitori ever to get back-to-back fusensho. The other two instances were through pairs of yokozuna going kyujo:

-Haru 1999, M5w Tochinonada wins by fusen against Wakanohana and Takanohana, days 10-11

-Aki 1999, M1w Tamakasuga wins by fusen against Takanohana and Akebono, days 3-4

All 51 fusen matchups of the 25 sekitori basho with multiple fusensho

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What's the most yusho/heya in a single basho? Has there ever been a clean sweep of all divisions by a single heya?

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2 hours ago, Benihana said:

What's the most yusho/heya in a single basho? Has there ever been a clean sweep of all divisions by a single heya?

 

I looked into this myself some years back, although I only went back to the start of the seven-bouts-per-basho for lower divisions in 1960. Since then my notes say there have been 8 basho in which 50% of the yusho were won by rikishi from one heya, most recently Onomatsu-beya in 2008 Kyushu.


1961 Aki - Nishonoseki
1961 Kyushu - Tokitsukaze
1963 Nagoya - Tokitsukaze
1967 Aki - Kasugano
1972 Aki - Hanakago
1984 Haru - Takasago
1997 Nagoya - Kitanoumi
2008 Kyushu - Onomatsu

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3 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

most recently Onomatsu-beya in 2008 Kyushu.

Sadly those three yusho winners combined went 1-2-12 as sekitori. 

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Kisenosato's intai leaves five rikishi from the old Narutobeya (now Tagonoura):

Adachi (33), highest rank Sd74

Awajiumi (25), Sd7

Sekizuka (21), Sd81

Takayasu (28), O

Terunosato (40), Sd23

 

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We are so much used to Hakuho smashing every record, we tend to forget about the extent of his lead in certain categories.

Today, Hakuho secured his (Makuuchi) KK on Nakabi for the 46th time. Which is utterly insane. Here's the top 5 with a couple of comments:

46   Hakuho

  • achieved participating in 83 basho (sit-outs excluded) -> 55.42%
  • 1x as Sekiwake, 1xOzeki, rest Y
  • at least one Makuuchi Nakabi KK in every single year between 2006 and 2019 (both including)
  • five years with five Nakabi KKs (four of which in consecutive years 11-14)
  • only person ever to achieve at least five Nakabi KKs in a single year (six has never happened)

25   Chiyonofuji

  • in 75 basho -> 33.33%
  • 2xSekiwake
  • at least one Nakabi KK in each year 1980-1990

23   Asashoryu

  • in 52 basho -> 44.23%
  • 1xSekiwake, 3xOzeki
  • most likely (I didn't really know how to check this) the only one ever to achieve a Nakabi KK in every single basho fought as an Ozeki (3/3)
  • at least one Nakabi KK in each year 2002-2009

22   Taiho

  • in 64 basho -> 34.38%
  • 1xMaegashira, 1xSekiwake, 1xOzeki
  • at least one Nakabi KK in each year 1960-1969 and 1971

20   Kitanoumi

  • in 74 basho -> 27.03%
  • 1xSekiwake, 2xOzeki
  • at least one Nakabi KK in each year 1974-1975, 1977-1981 and 1984

 

Here's the query.

Edited by yorikiried by fate
error and bracket
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4 hours ago, yorikiried by fate said:

most likely (I didn't really know how to check this) the only one ever to achieve a Nakabi KK in every single basho fought as an Ozeki (3/3)

He is the only one since 1958. Futabayama's two bashos as Ozeki (Jan, May 1937) were both zensho-yusho.

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31 minutes ago, Kamitsuumi said:

He is the only one since 1958. Futabayama's two bashos as Ozeki (Jan, May 1937) were both zensho-yusho.

But as those were basho of 11 and 13 bouts, the KKs were secured on days 6 and 7 respectively. I suppose that’s still technically ‘nakabi’ but not quite the same as a streak of 8 wins (although I fully appreciate that in his particular case they were part of his record win streak).

Edited by Eikokurai

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On 19/01/2019 at 14:22, Yubinhaad said:

I looked into this myself some years back, although I only went back to the start of the seven-bouts-per-basho for lower divisions in 1960. Since then my notes say there have been 8 basho in which 50% of the yusho were won by rikishi from one heya, most recently Onomatsu-beya in 2008 Kyushu.

An extended search unsurprisingly turns up a ton of pre-WWII Dewanoumi results, led by this near-sweep in October 1927. Also another 7 basho with 4 divisional yusho between 1914 and 1928.

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