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I looked a bit further in the past (back to just before the period in 1992/1993) where there were no Yokozuna on the banzuke and (if I didn't make any mistakes) on the following days in the last 26 years are the days during Honbasho that no battles involving a Yokozuna took place at all and no Yokozuna Dohyo-iri was performed.

Nagoya 2018, days 6 through 15 - 3 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Kisenosato kyujo from the start; Hakuho kyujo from day 4, Kakuryu kyujo from day 6.
Natsu 2006, days 3 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Asashoryu kyujo from day 3.
Nagoya 2003, days 10 through 15 - 2 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Musahimaru kyujo from day 6, Asashoryu from day 10.
Hatsu 2003, days 9 through 15 - 2 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Musashimaru kyujo from from the start, Takanohana kyujo and intai from day 9.
Kyushu 2002, days 6 through 15 - 2 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Takanohana kyujo from the start, Musashimaru kyujo from day 6.
Hatsu 2002, days 4 through 15 -  2 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Takanohana kyujo from the start, Musashimaru kyujo from day 4.
Haru 1999, days 11 through 15 - 3 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Akebono kyujo from the start, Wakanohana kyujo from day 10, Takanohana kyujo from day 11.
Aki 1994, days 1 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Akebono kyujo from the start.
Nagoya 1994, days 1 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Akebono kyujo from the start.
Natsu 1994, days 12 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Akebono kyujo from day 12.
Nagoya 1992 day 1 through Hatsu 1993 day 15 - no Yokozuna on the banzuke.
Natsu 1992, days 1 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Hokutoumi kyujo and intai from the start.
Haru 1992, days 3 through 15 - 1 Yokozuna on the banzuke; Hokutoumi kyujo from day 3.

Edited by Chijanofuji
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25 minutes ago, Chijanofuji said:

(if I didn't make any mistakes)

You didn't.

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Chiyonokuni is only the fourth rikishi to collect two fusensho wins against Yokozuna in the same basho. The last to do so, Tamakasuga, is now Kataonami-oyakata and was serving as a shimpan for Chiyonokuni's bout today.

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1 minute ago, Yubinhaad said:

Chiyonokuni is only the fourth rikishi to collect two fusensho wins against Yokozuna in the same basho. The last to do so, Tamakasuga, is now Kataonami-oyakata and was serving as a shimpan for Chiyonokuni's bout today.

What is the record for most fusensho against any rank in a single tournament? How about all sanyaku?

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46 minutes ago, Yubinhaad said:

Chiyonokuni is only the fourth rikishi to collect two fusensho wins against Yokozuna in the same basho. The last to do so, Tamakasuga, is now Kataonami-oyakata and was serving as a shimpan for Chiyonokuni's bout today.

You beat me to it! I was about to post the same query. I was surprised it was not unique actually. 

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5 hours ago, Yubinhaad said:

Chiyonokuni is only the fourth rikishi to collect two fusensho wins against Yokozuna in the same basho. The last to do so, Tamakasuga, is now Kataonami-oyakata and was serving as a shimpan for Chiyonokuni's bout today.

On a related note, the mentioned Dewanishiki from the 1950s is also the runaway leader in overall fusensho against yokozuna.

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15 hours ago, Asashosakari said:

5-0 Jk29w Roman (Tatsunami)

(...) That should mean yet another 1-loss matchup for Roman, already his fourth (...)

Lower-division rikishi who had the most bouts where they entered unbeaten while their opponent already had a loss - the post-1989 record (for which the DB has all lower division torikumi) is in fact 4 bouts.

Jk49e Chanohana in 1997.01 - at 1-0, 2-0, 3-0 and 4-0
Jk31w Omiyamoto in 2006.07 - at 3-0, 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0
Jk17e Iwasaki in 2012.07 - at 3-0, 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0
Jk14e Masutoo in 2012.11 - at 3-0, 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0
Jk17w Kotonoshima in 2013.11 - at 1-0, 3-0, 4-0 and 5-0 (lost)
Jk29w Roman in 2018.07 - at 2-0, 3-0, 4-0 and 5-0

Getting 3 such matchups is rather more common and has happened 30 times since 1989, so on average about once a year. The most recent one was Jk21w Ihara in 2016.11 at 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0.

Honourable mention to two pre-1989 cases that the DB happens to have:

another one with 4 bouts: Jk2w Fukunomoto 1970.03 - at 3-0, 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0 (lost)

the sole case with 3 bouts above jonokuchi: Jd106w Masunohama in 1978.09 - at 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0 (lost)


(The most recent case with 2 bouts above jonokuchi was Sd72e Yamamoto in 2002.11 at 5-0 and 6-0.)
 

There are conceivable scenarios in which Roman could set a new all-time record, but it's much more likely that he faces a 6-0 opponent in the last round (assuming he actually wins tomorrow himself) and stays at 4 such matches.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Given that Mitakeumi and Yoshikaze are on pace for a 15-0 and 0-15 record this basho, respectively, I was curious to know when was the last time this occurred in the makuuchi division. I am terrible at executing those queries on the database so any responses would be greatly appreciated!

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29 minutes ago, wys said:

Given that Mitakeumi and Yoshikaze are on pace for a 15-0 and 0-15 record this basho, respectively, I was curious to know when was the last time this occurred in the makuuchi division. I am terrible at executing those queries on the database so any responses would be greatly appreciated!

I guess you won't accept last March with Kotoyuki competing with a 0-9-1 record, so it'll be Kyushu 2016. (Kakuryu and Kaisei)

Edit: Or did you mean when a 15-0/0-15 combo actually happened? Well, there have been only four 0-15 in Makuuchi so far, and none of these were accompanied by a zensho.

Edited by Jakusotsu

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21 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

I guess you won't accept last March with Kotoyuki competing with a 0-9-1 record, so it'll be Kyushu 2016. (Kakuryu and Kaisei)

Edit: Or did you mean when a 15-0/0-15 combo actually happened? Well, there have been only four 0-15 in Makuuchi so far, and none of these were accompanied by a zensho.

Yeah, I meant the latter. I am surprised it has never happened yet. If that is the case, we'll witness history in this basho if it ever comes to pass!

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Those four 0-15 rikishi mentioned above were spread out over 50 years.  The first, Katsuragawa, went 3-12 the basho before his 0-15; this was just after the basho went to 15 bouts, and there were two basho per year.  The 0-15 basho was his last: he went intai at J2.

Is this the same Katsuragawa that took over the original Kise stable?

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54 minutes ago, wys said:

Yeah, I meant the latter. I am surprised it has never happened yet. If that is the case, we'll witness history in this basho if it ever comes to pass!

If a rikishi looks like he’s headings towards an 0-15, then he’ll probably find an excuse to go kyujo rather than face the ignominy of having a zenpai on his personal record.

That said, there are some examples of makuuchi guys who went as far as day 13 without a win and stuck around to the bitter end anyway. Shohozan got a solitary white star on day 14 of Haru 2015.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_basho.aspx?r=6614&b=201503

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10 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

If a rikishi looks like he’s headings towards an 0-15, then he’ll probably find an excuse to go kyujo rather than face the ignominy of having a zenpai on his personal record.

That said, there are some examples of makuuchi guys who went as far as day 13 without a win and stuck around to the bitter end anyway. Shohozan got a solitary white star on day 14 of Haru 2015.

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_basho.aspx?r=6614&b=201503

I found a 1-14 guy who got his sole win on the final day and it wasn’t actually that long ago:

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_basho.aspx?r=6497&b=201307

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And another one. Homasho. He got his one win on day 15 of Natsu 2009 against ... Yoshikaze!

http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi_basho.aspx?r=6018&b=200905

There are also a couple of 1-14ers whose sole ‘win’ was a fusen, though they came earlier in the basho and so they never really faced the prospect of a 0-15.

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I guess getting 0-15 is harder than one might think! And asking for a 15-0 in the same basho would make the co-occurence of those two events even less likely!

Edited by wys

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3 hours ago, wys said:

I guess getting 0-15 is harder than one might think!

The hardest part is becoming a sekitori. It's pretty easy after that.

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7 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

Those four 0-15 rikishi mentioned above were spread out over 50 years.  The first, Katsuragawa, went 3-12 the basho before his 0-15; this was just after the basho went to 15 bouts, and there were two basho per year.  The 0-15 basho was his last: he went intai at J2.

Is this the same Katsuragawa that took over the original Kise stable?

Yes. He is Kise IX here.

(You get there by going to my A-Z site and clicking "Kabu" on the top line and then "Kise" down the left.

If you click on Katsuragawa within his record it takes you straight to his record in the database)

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This is the first time in history that two Sekitori (i.e. Chiyonokuni and Shodai) get two fusen wins each in the same basho.

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14 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

Those four 0-15 rikishi mentioned above were spread out over 50 years.  The first, Katsuragawa, went 3-12 the basho before his 0-15; this was just after the basho went to 15 bouts, and there were two basho per year.  The 0-15 basho was his last: he went intai at J2.

Is this the same Katsuragawa that took over the original Kise stable?

 

6 hours ago, Naganoyama said:

Yes. He is Kise IX here.

(You get there by going to my A-Z site and clicking "Kabu" on the top line and then "Kise" down the left.

If you click on Katsuragawa within his record it takes you straight to his record in the database)

And Kiyonomori, the second unfortunate 0-15 rikishi, is Katsuragawa's son-in-law and was Kise X.

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Yoshiazuma holds several records for active rikishi. A career of 22 years without kyujo - Asahi tells that this basho he reached one basho more than the record holder of most consecutive bouts Aobajo (but sumo reference has both at 135), who has over 500 bouts more though. At the moment Yoshiazuma has the most consecutive bouts of all active rikishi, but on day 15 Tamawashi can  catch up with him - with a career that's 8 years shorter. Yoshiazuma is the 2nd oldest to get promoted to makuuchi and the oldest active former sekitori. http://www.asahi.com/articles/ASL7K5FL9L7KUTQP035.html

AS20180717003878_commL.jpg

With 18 basho in juryo and 3 in makuuchi he isn't qualified for a toshiyori myoseki - but someone like him is ideal for a wakaimono-gashira  - maybe he'll keep on till a spot is available

Edited by Akinomaki
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Wow, I never realized Tamawashi is such an iron horse. More power to him!

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Probably just me but I found that article to be a bit of a disjointed mess. On top of that, the record for most consecutive basho without kyujo belongs to another 41-year-old active rikishi, Shoketsu, who doesn't even get a mention. :-S

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3 hours ago, Yubinhaad said:

Probably just me but I found that article to be a bit of a disjointed mess. On top of that, the record for most consecutive basho without kyujo belongs to another 41-year-old active rikishi, Shoketsu, who doesn't even get a mention. :-S

That's why it's just trivia. The point of the article was apparently only that Yoshiazuma as the leader among the active rikishi in terms of consecutive bouts, surpasses the overall leader Aobajo in respect to the number of consecutive basho. And that his lead lasts only till the end of this basho.

Shoketsu never reached sekitori, maybe that's why the article didn't care to mention him .

Edited by Akinomaki

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