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Trivia bits

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Well, my point is that the rikishi's real name would have to seem "natural" to the Japanese language.  If my first name were Ken, it wouldn't seem strange to have that name in Japan (though a person might say "Hmm, how did this foreigner get a Japanese given name?").  There don't seem to be any non-Asian surnames I can think of that would "pass" as an acceptable Japanese surname, let alone pass the test of sounding and looking "Sumo-like".

To the first point:  The DB is down now, but when I checked "Endo" and "Shodai", there were multiple predecessors, almost all with the family name "Endo" or "Shodai".  I've only come up with single examples of "Baruto" ... or "Torakio".

Postscript 1:  My comments about the foreign Oyakata only suggests that they may "think outside the box" more when establishing their new heya.  Of the first five uchi-deshi from the new Narutobeya, only one (Oshozan) seems to have a shikona relating to the Oyakata or the stable (though, of course, I may be wrong).

Postscript 2: I don't remember receiving this information from the Forum, but I guess there is some oversight (at least unofficially) from the NSK on assigning shikona.  So, no crazy ideas would ultimately get through?

Postscript 3: I seem to be getting jumped on more often for my opinions lately.  I take it as a badge of honor!:-)

 

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12 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

There don't seem to be any non-Asian surnames I can think of that would "pass" as an acceptable Japanese surname, let alone pass the test of sounding and looking "Sumo-like".

The name of the last president of the US would have qualified perfectly well, don't you think? ;-)

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6 minutes ago, torquato said:

The name of the last president of the US would have qualified perfectly well, don't you think? ;-)

Ah, yes, I forgot about that one. Named for that little fishing village where they make all those chopsticks :-)

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1 minute ago, Yamanashi said:

Ah, yes, I forgot about that one. Named for that little fishing village where they make all those chopsticks :-)

Yes, exactly. But I forgot about the chopsticks… :-D

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Aminishiki now is the oldest and the second oldest rikishi to ever get makuuchi promotion, Takekaze in third place. The amazing geriatric duo.

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On 22/04/2018 at 16:46, rhyen said:

True, I still like it when Ichinojo's shikona sounds a lot like his first name. 

Is it just mere coincidence?

Can anyone provide me with some more info on Ichinojō's shikona. Would it be considered a form of ateji? (I'm learning Japanese and this would be helpful to me) thanks in advance

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5 hours ago, Akōgyokuseki said:

Can anyone provide me with some more info on Ichinojō's shikona. Would it be considered a form of ateji? (I'm learning Japanese and this would be helpful to me) thanks in advance

Many shikona have some ateji-like parts, but only a few are just that, like Baruto - Ichinojo has a proper shikona story:

On 11/28/2013 at 10:53, Akinomaki said:

Continues to be new recruit:

The shikona for Ichinnorow: 逸ノ城 Ichinojō

His real name for the sound of the first kanji, the meaning being outstanding talent, and the jō (castle) from his high school Tottori Jōhoku.

http://www.nikkansports.com/sports/sumo/news/f-sp-tp3-20131128-1224342.html

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Many thanks Akinomaki. The info you provided me with makes me appreciate how clever his shikona is, especially the ジョウ part.

(Unfortunately I am listed as an inactive member and cannot show appreciation for your post, sorry)

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Takayasu's withdrawal from Natsu basho makes it the first basho since Hatsu 1982 to start with only one ozeki on the Day 1 schedule, and the first since Haru 1925 while having two ozeki actually present on the banzuke. (However, for completenes: Hatsu 1991 had one of its two ozeki withdrawing from his scheduled shonichi bout.)

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On 4/23/2018 at 00:48, Yamanashi said:

There don't seem to be any non-Asian surnames I can think of that would "pass" as an acceptable Japanese surname, let alone pass the test of sounding and looking "Sumo-like".

O'Hara / 小原

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Not a shikona, but a good name for a kung fu master: Gu Ning

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Rikito's results (7-28) from Nagoya to Haru seem to have tied for the worst ever full-attendance 5-basho run by a reasonably competent lower-division rikishi (i.e. not Moriurara types in or barely out of jonokuchi).

Query - only Iwakikaze in 1961 and Hamamura in 1964/65 also went the full 7-28, the rest missed matches.

Honourable post-WWII mentions to Wakanishiki who went 6-30 across 5 and 8-36 across 6 tournaments in 1960/1961 (first two still in the 8-bout era, so excluded above), and Hakuiyama who went an astounding 6-34 in 1956/57 - directly after getting demoted from juryo, no less.

Edited by Asashosakari
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Day 15 Kakuryu vs Hakuho.  The last time they met was Kyushu 2016.  That's more than a year ago!!!   What's the longest gap between 2 yokozuna matches?

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Tochinoshin trivia:

60 bashos to Ozeki since entering Makuuchi-tied for most ever with Masuiyama 2.

73 bashos to Ozeki  since entering sumo - tied for 9th place with Takayasu.

30 years and 7 months old at promotion-  4th  oldest since the 6 basho a year system was established.

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

Tochinoshin trivia:

60 bashos to Ozeki since entering Makuuchi-tied for most ever with Masuiyama 2.

73 bashos to Ozeki  since entering sumo - tied for 9th place with Takayasu.

30 years and 7 months old at promotion-  4th  oldest since the 6 basho a year system was established.

 

 

 

 

When is the promotion counted from? When it appears on the banzuke or from the end of the tournament previous?

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8 hours ago, Eikokurai said:

When is the promotion counted from? When it appears on the banzuke or from the end of the tournament previous?

Banzuke.

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Was just reading a Google translation of Hokutoumi's Wikipedia article (as you do) and it said that his match with Asahifuji in July 1991 was the last bout to date between two Japanese-born yokozuna. That's 27 years! And if Kisenosato retires before the next Japanese yokozuna is promoted (which seems likely) we could be waiting quite a while longer.

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I don't know how to make a query of this, but while playing GKA this basho I noted that (Kyujo Kisenosato aside) the top 16 (actually 19) are all from different heya.  Kise/Takayasu spoil thing on paper, so I wonder what the record is for most different heya before a repeat at the top of the banzuke--I couldn't come up with a good way to query that out of the DB.

Edited by Ryoshishokunin

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I looked back to 2002 only, and the most diverse top-rankers I found was in Natsu 2005 with the first repeat being Sadogatake at M5e. That's 16 rikishi from different heyas on top, exactly the magic number for a perfect round-robin (which didn't happen, of course...).

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That reminds me of what might have been my very first foray into trivia on the forum:

TL;DR There were only three basho between 1945 and 2003 where all sanyaku-rankers were from different stables, so in general the first repeated heya has come very early on the banzuke. (Having frequently much bigger diversity at the top is a recent phenomenon, largely driven by the one-foreigner-per-stable rule. As you'll note at the end of the thread, Doitsuyama already predicted that development back then.)

Edited by Asashosakari
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And, checking those three banzuke pointed out in that thread, the Natsu 2005 basho is the 'most diverse at the top' that I was looking for.  Thanks to both of you.

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If I'm not mistaken Kakuryu's absence today (Nagoya 2018, day 6) marks the first day in a Honbasho since Natsu 2006, when Asashoryu - the  lone Yokozuna at the time - went kyujo on day 3, that no match involving a Yokozuna was fought and no Yokozuna dohyo-iri was performed (so that goes for days 3 through 15 of that basho).

Did I get that right?

Edited by Chijanofuji

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