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Akinomaki

Canadian Sumo Hope

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I find it hilarious that the lead of the article is that the guy has blond hair.

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Reminds me of a Japanese friend who visited me here some years ago in Berlin. When we crossed a bridge and looking down to the Love Parade rave going on below, she remarked that in Japan they all would have looked the same with their black hair.

I always find it inspiring how different your approach to look at the world can be... ;-)

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Brodi is now Nishikido Beya's newest rikishi. Oyakata agreed to take him about three hours ago. He will move into the heya tomorrow and the paperwork process will start immediately.

Congratulations, Nishi, to the young man and those who helped him.

Orion

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Reminds me of a Japanese friend who visited me here some years ago in Berlin. When we crossed a bridge and looking down to the Love Parade rave going on below, she remarked that in Japan they all would have looked the same with their black hair.

I doubt that. Japanese kids attending a rave would have anything but black hair.

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Reminds me of a Japanese friend who visited me here some years ago in Berlin. When we crossed a bridge and looking down to the Love Parade rave going on below, she remarked that in Japan they all would have looked the same with their black hair.

I doubt that. Japanese kids attending a rave would have anything but black hair.

Sure. But, that's why I remembered it. I found it remarkable that she was focusing on haircolour at that moment.

Looking at the pictures I'd say he's probably the first rikishi with a proper chonmage from day 1 in maezumo. :-)

Edit: A white mawashi..? (Thinking in depth...)

Edited by torquato

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Great news indeed!

Already start to wonder about his shikona...

How about (about to be pronounced Canadian style)

金田 ?

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Blonde Brodie-kun

I forgot how blonde hair can create attention in Japan - or even headlines in this case.

I guess we will hear comparisons to Baruto very soon.

Anyway, I wish him good luck, endurance and patience for the many challenges that lie ahead!

Looking forward to seeing him at maezumo in May!

Edited by kuroimori

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Nishi, what is his current level? How long before reaching makushita, do you reckon? Any particular strength, technique? What does he need to work on, according to the oyakata?

I hope his blond hair not to be his only novelty. Wish him luck.

Edited by I am the Yokozuna

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The hair will all have to come off.

Also, out of curiosity, why is that? Isn't a little grooming enough to make it look rikishi-proper?

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It's probably too long. Look how wavy it is; consider how long it will be once fully straightened out.

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The hair will all have to come off.

Also, out of curiosity, why is that? Isn't a little grooming enough to make it look rikishi-proper?

Too bad indeed, it would have been quite a nice head start - no pun intended - for his mage.

On the other hand, it would also be great to (hopefully) see a mage-less up-and-comer in Makushita or even challenging for a sekitori debut with long - and bright blonde - hair.

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Edit: A white mawashi..? (Thinking in depth...)

Amateurs wear white mawashi. Must be strange to switch to a black one, but many men have done it. Only one Canadian before.

Orion

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The competitions he was taking part in don't seem to have any tsuppari, I never watch it but from what I just saw nobody was doing any. That will be something to adjust to! The mats they wrestle on look terrible too, I think the clay will be better but maybe more slippery sometimes. Baruto gone as well at Kotooshu, a North American should be interesting, we can get some interviews in English. I was curious about the cutting of the hair comment, do they have to cut it and start growing it out from the start of their training, like boot camp!? I did see the older pictures of Ichi and he did have short hair when he started. I'm guessing thats the case. Too bad he could have a proper top knot right now! He should get through the lowest ranks I would think, he has some general experience and the proper training he will get will improve everything I would think. Something to keep an eye on, very nice, domo arigato gozaimas Kintamayama for the email updates!

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Hi there!

I train amateur sumo in the Los Angeles area, and have had a few chances to meet (and wrestle!) with Brody. He's a nice humble guy who seems to really enjoy doing sumo. I saw him win the openweight championship at the U.S. Sumo Open last September and he seemed really overjoyed, even surprised, given the stiff level of competition he faces, including multiple amateur sumo world champion Byambajav Ulambayar (former makushita Daishochi).

I think Brody's biggest challenge entering pro sumo will be keeping a positive attitude. Living as a professional sumo wrestler can be very tough, especially for someone that young that far from home. He's physically very tough, though, so I hope that helps him.

Regarding someone the above post's remark about tsuppari, amateur sumo does not allow for tsuppari to the face, so yes, that will be a big adjustment. One of the articles previously posted had a quote from Nishikido-oyakata saying that it was amusing to see Brody get tsuppari'd for the first time.

The unfortunate truth about amateur sumo, at least in North America, is that the competition is very poor. A lot of the people who compete are part-timers or dilletantes who decide to maybe do one or two tournaments because of the freak show appeal of saying they do sumo. It's hard to find the support to maintain any kind of dojo for training regularly, and a lot of the people who WOULD be more dedicated if they could are scattered across different states. That's often why Byamba runs roughshod over the competition in North American tournaments (they don't mention in the articles that Brody lost in the heavyweight category of that same tournament despite winning openweight), because most of the people he faces just don't train often enough to put up any kind of fight. So Brody is going to encounter a whole different level of competition and it might be a big shock.

I wish all the best for Brody, and look forward to following his development. If sumo doesn't work out, I know a few pro wrestling promoters who'd like to make him just as successful as John Tenta was.

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Best of luck to this young man, I have so much respect for all of these foreign guys who not only have to learn the sport but also a whole new way of life.

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amateur sumo does not allow for tsuppari to the face, so yes, that will be a big adjustment.

Tsuppari is allowed. You're probably mixing it up with harite which isn't (in amateur sumo).

Hi there, yes, you're correct, I was referring to harite.

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amateur sumo does not allow for tsuppari to the face, so yes, that will be a big adjustment.

Tsuppari is allowed. You're probably mixing it up with harite which isn't (in amateur sumo).

what's the difference between tsuppari and harite? I thought they were synonymous for open hand strike?

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what's the difference between tsuppari and harite? I thought they were synonymous for open hand strike?

Jab -v- Roundhouse.

In tsuppari the hands are going in straight lines from you to your opponent. It's a shoving / thrusting motion. In harite your hands come swinging from a wider-than-your-shoulder angle.

ScreenShot2015-02-10at41004PM_zpsa1b739b

Great way to explain the difference!

By the way, the guy who fires a fierce harite in the illustration isn't by chance the famous Koumoriyama? ;-)

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That is what the rules in amasumo say but in reality the gyoji and shinpanzees never pull up harite. A certain Bulgarian does it every time in the finals at the World Championships. The worst punishment he gets is a rematch even after blatantly breaking Mongolian noses. I believe one of the main reasons is to protect us amateurs from ruptured ear drums and also because most are crap at it.

I suspect karma and mutual respect keeps any nasty harite in check in Ozumo.

Best of luck to Brodi. Beating Byamba is an awesome feat. Byamba has to go to Japan before world championships to get his dohyo mojo back on clay because it's quite different to fighting on plastic. I would have liked to have seen Brodi in action at a World Championships but the mysteriously world of Ozumo is his kakifurai now.

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Another oyakata that wanted him said he had ozeki potential.

Since information on the recruitment of foreigners are rather vage, I'd like to ask (without digging to deep) how many heya did he visit / try out before he was accepted by Nishikido Oyakata?

Out of previous comments, I conclude that his performances were well recieved.

I wish him all the best! Fingers crossed for a good start into his career!

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This is great news! He may be destined to grow into the footprints of mighty Kaido Höövelson, beside being tall, big and blonde, his friendliness and work ethic had been underlined.

I'm sure he will get a lot of media coverage in Japan that will make up for the lack of local support.

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