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Akinomaki

Sumo obituaries

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8 Yokozuna passed away in a period of the last 10 years. Even 6 years after the death of Chiyonofuji it’s so sad to see him in this list…

He managed to outlive only Futahaguro, who had been gravely ill more than 10 years before his death.

2013:Taiho (72)

2015: Kitanoumi (62)

2016:Chiyonofuji(61)

2017:Sadanoyama(79)

2018:Wajima(70)

2019:Futahaguro(55)

2021:Tochinoumi(82)

2022:Wakanohana(69)

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48 minutes ago, Kenneth Minami said:

8 Yokozuna passed away in a period of the last 10 years. Even 6 years after the death of Chiyonofuji it’s so sad to see him in this list…

He managed to outlive only Futahaguro, who had been gravely ill more than 10 years before his death.

2013:Taiho (72)

2015: Kitanoumi (62)

2016:Chiyonofuji(61)

2017:Sadanoyama(79)

2018:Wajima(70)

2019:Futahaguro(55)

2021:Tochinoumi(82)

2022:Wakanohana(69)

Prior to that Takanosato died in 2011 (59).

 

Swami

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7 hours ago, Swami said:

I remember a few years ago they had a photo of virtually all surviving former yokozuna and it is quite scary to think now how few are left:

Kitanofuji, Mienoumi, Hokutoumi, Onokuni, Asahifuji, Akebono, Takanohana II, Wakanohana III, Musashimaru, Asashoryu, Hakuho, Harumafuji, Kakuryu and Kisenosato.

Swami

 

Onokuni and Akebono both look very frail to me. 

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2 hours ago, rhyen said:

 

Onokuni and Akebono both look very frail to me. 

Onokuni would in theory be due for his kanreki dohyo-iri this year, though I'd be surprised if we see it happen.

Any word of Akebono?  

Swami

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15 hours ago, rhyen said:

 

Onokuni and Akebono both look very frail to me. 

Musashimaru, Asahifuji and Takanohana in my opinion don’t look genki too. Or it may be just ageing…

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10 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

https://www.nikkansports.com/battle/sumo/news/202207260000542.html

The 37th Kimura Shōnosuke has passed away. 

The last Shonosuke died on the 22nd at home, at the age of 72, of chronic ILD. He retired in 2015 and for 7 years sumo is without a top tate-gyoji.

202207260000667-w200_2.jpgo

The Weekly Post had interviewed him 3 days before his death about the Terunofuji-Wakamotoharu disaster (the papers name that as the 2nd worst thing of the basho after the many kyujo).

He had no sashi-chigae as tategyoji, neither as Inosuke nor as Shonosuke, only one famous hansoku decision after a mono-ii by Hakuho - a hansoku reversal does not constitute a wrong decision by the gyoji. http://www.news-postseven.com/archives/20220726_1777115.html

last bout Haru 2015

202207260000667-w200_0.jpgo20220726at57S_t.jpgo

drop from the dohyo Hatsu 2012

202207260000667-w200_1.jpgo

As Tamajiro Hatsu1989

202207260000542-w200_1.jpgo

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2 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

He had no sashi-chigae as tategyoji, neither as Inosuke nor as Shonosuke, only one famous hansoku decision after a mono-ii by Hakuho - a hansoku reversal does not constitute a wrong decision by the gyoji. http://www.news-postseven.com/archives/20220726_1777115.html

This is amazing. I wish I had paid attention to this kind of detail back then. Ozumo has been missing this kind of quality lately. His legacy will absolutely go on.

Regarding his interview about that fiasco - has his opinion been posted elsewhere on the forum? I must've missed it.

Lastly... He still managed to outlive that Baruto / Wakakoyu bump by a decade, which is impressive. That was on the blessed araibira era of daily YT uploads - I genuinely thought for a bit that was the end of him.

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3 hours ago, Koorifuu said:

Lastly... He still managed to outlive that Baruto / Wakakoyu bump by a decade, which is impressive. That was on the blessed araibira era of daily YT uploads - I genuinely thought for a bit that was the end of him.

The sequence is on the db (Hatsu basho day 4 January 11 2012).  The sound of his head hitting the floor is clearly audible. (Weeping...)

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Koorifuu said:

Regarding his interview about that fiasco - has his opinion been posted elsewhere on the forum? I must've missed it.

I ran the article through DeepL, and felt I got some good insight. Anyone who knows Japanese, feel free to correct it.

http://www.news-postseven.com/archives/20220726_1777115.html :

Quote

 On July 26, the Japan Sumo Association announced that Saburo Hatakeyama, who served as the 37th Kimura Shonosuke, a standing gyoji, died of chronic interstitial pneumonia at his home on July 22 at the age of 72. The Weekly Post interviewed Mr. Hatakeyama at his home three days before his death, but the news of his death came shortly after that. During the interview that day, Hatakeyama shared his views on the match between Terunofuji and Waka Motoharu at the conclusion of the middle day of the Nagoya tournament, in which the tachigyoji, Shikimori Inosuke, made the "mawashi wait" move.

 On the day of the interview, Shizuko Hatakeyama's wife showed me around the living room, where Hatakeyama was lying on his side watching NHK's live sumo broadcast. I can't sit down because my legs hurt," he said. Sorry about that," he said, welcoming the reporter with a smile.

 Two months ago, during the summer tournament, we visited Mr. Hatakeyama at his home to ask about the seven-year absence of "Kimura Shonosuke," the highest ranking gyoji, since his retirement in 2015. Mr. Hatakeyama was lying down as he spoke then as well, but this time he seemed to have more difficulty speaking.

 In the first bout at the conclusion of the middle day of the Nagoya tournament, which was the subject of the interview, the gyoji, Shikimori Inosuke, called out to Waka Motoharu that his mawashi was loose, but Waka Motoharu did not notice the call and leaned over Terunofuji, who had loosened his grip.

 Chief referee Sadogatake and others gathered in the ring, and after a long two-and-a-half minute discussion, it was decided to resume from the original position. After only nine seconds, Motoharu Waka was defeated by a shimote-nage (underhand throw). Mr. Hatakeyama had this to say about the match.

The referee's rules state that the gyoji can stop the action and have the wrestler retighten the mawashi. So the gyoji's decision to wait for the mawashi was not wrong. The referee under the ring may have called for the mawashi. But even if the mawashi is loose, you don't stop when a rikishi is moving. The timing may have been a little late, but when you have to stop, you have to stop with all your might.

 The question was where to start again. Since he was moving, no one could tell (the moment he waited for the mawashi). Terunofuji had one mawashi on his left, but when he resumed, he rolled (Waka Motoharu) with his lower left hand, which he grabbed firmly. That's what happens when you re-tighten the mawashi.

 Normally, when mawashi is waited for, unlike in mizu-iri, where the two riders are separated, the mawashi is fastened again while the riders are still in the ring. This allows the wrestlers to resume their original positions, but in this case, they had moved. The head of the refereeing department was in contact with the video room on the ring, trying to recreate the situation, but he did not know which form to resume from if there had been any movement. The other referees could not point out the correct form to him. It would have been better to start again from the crouching position. I can't say for sure, since it was the referee's decision, but I think he had that option.

-

 Since Hatakeyama's retirement in 2015, the highest rank, Shonosuke Kimura, has remained vacant for seven years. The current 41st Shikimori Inosuke is said to have been passed over for promotion until now due to health issues as well as a number of misadventures and falls from the ring.

 When asked about this, Hatakeyama replied, "I am often asked about it, but it is not up to me. Hatakeyama added, "But the gyoji is not only in charge of judging matches in the ring.

 The gyoji has a variety of roles, such as announcing in the ring, writing the gyoji's name, writing the gyoji's banzuke, serving as secretary at meetings to organize tournaments, and accounting for tournaments. In particular, the tachi-gyoji has many duties, including serving as the ringmaster for the ring festival and announcing the next day's bouts.

 During an interview in May, Mr. Hatakeyama mentioned that the gyoji carries a small sword on his left hip. Originally, this was to commit seppuku (ritual suicide) in the event of a mistaken decision, but Hatakeyama said, "It means that gyoji enter the ring with that kind of resolve.

When you make a mistake in judging a match, you can't commit seppuku every time," he said with a laugh. There was a case in which a gyoji was suspended twice in a single tournament for a misjudgement, but a gyoji must never make a mistake in judging a match. I served as gyoji for nine seasons with Shonosuke and six seasons with Inosuke, and during that time I did not receive a single gyoji black star (osa-miseki). In my three years as tachi-gyoji, I did not have a single misplaced star. I am proud of that.

 Hatakeyama, 37th generation Kimura Shonosuke, is known for raising his right hand in protest when Hakuho, who was waiting in the wings, raised his right hand to call out Hakuho in the 12th day of the May 2014 tournament when Goueido-Tsururyu had the upper hand. After a discussion, Goueido grabbed the topknot and Tsururyu was awarded a foul, but he recalled, "The act of grabbing the topknot is difficult.

Gyoji rarely point out [that a rikishi grabbed the topknot]," he said. Of course, a reserve rikishi is allowed to make a comment, but in most cases, the referee will point it out, and a video judgment will be made to determine whether or not a foul was committed. A foul loss is not considered a "shakudo" (a wrongful death)."

 From his words, it was clear that Mr. Hatakeyama is proud to have served as "Kimura Shonosuke. However, during this interview, his voice was not as loud as in May, and there were some scenes where he looked distressed while holding his lower abdomen during the story. Still, as he watched the live sumo broadcast, he spoke enthusiastically to the screen, saying, "This gyoji's standing position is not good.

 Mr. Hatakeyama, the 37th Kimura Shonosuke, passed away on the 13th day of the Nagoya tournament. When a reporter asked him if being a gyoji is not a tough job, he replied, "I am glad I became a gyoji. I love sumo," he said. I would like to pray for his soul rest in peace.

Interview and text by Katsuro Ukai

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

Edited by Flyric
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6 hours ago, Koorifuu said:

Regarding his interview about that fiasco - has his opinion been posted elsewhere on the forum? I must've missed it.

Herouth has a concise summary, although it's not as comprehensive as the one Flyric just posted.

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12 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

The sequence is on the db (Hatsu basho day 4 January 11 2012).  The sound of his head hitting the floor is clearly audible. (Weeping...)

Woah, just watched... that was a sickening noise. Glad he recovered from that.

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He talked about having come close to death three times:

 - When he came out of a bar drunk and was run over (by a motorbike I think)

- When he had cancer.

- When he was knocked unconscious from the dohyo.

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On 18/07/2022 at 02:51, Kenneth Minami said:

He was 56th Yokozuna and one of those who didn’t manage to show his full potential on dohyo, in my opinion.

Maybe as a yokozuna, he wasn't as successful as we're used to, but the joi a the time was extremely talented.  With injuries and the emergence of Chiyonofuji, success would have been hard for anyone.

 

Disclaimer:  I was a HUGE fan of his when he still held the shikona Wakamisugi.  The mawashi I'm wearing in my avatar is purple because he wore purple.  I even had "WAKAMISUGI" written on my home-made kesho mawashi (made out of a paper bag with a crayola drawn Mt Fuji on it.)

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1 hour ago, Washuyama said:

Maybe as a yokozuna, he wasn't as successful as we're used to, but the joi a the time was extremely talented.  With injuries and the emergence of Chiyonofuji, success would have been hard for anyone.

Plus his off-dohyō struggles with what was essentially a socially-compelled marriage to Wakanohana I's daughter. 

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Posted (edited)

A bit late and slightly off-topic, but it was all over the sumo related news and I kept it for a news drought time like now: human national treasure kabuki actor and ex-YDC member Sawamura Tanosuke 澤村田之助_(6代目) had passed away on June 23rd. He was on the YDC for 13 years, starting in 2003. In 2010 as Asashoryu was ousted, he commented on the importance of hinkaku "In my youth there were nearly no dame-oshi (extra shoves) and harisashi (slap and grab), a lack of manners". As Hakuho went for Futabayama's 69 wins in a row: "His respect for Futabayama is a good thing", as the 2011 Haru basho got canceled due to the yaocho scandal: "At least for having the banzuke compiled, hadn't it been better to let them do sumo?" http://www.jiji.com/jc/article?k=2022062500434&g=spo

On the left with YDC top Tsuruta

20220625at62S_t.jpg20220625-OYT1I50178-T.jpg?type=mediumo

Edited by Akinomaki
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