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Naganoyama

Have you ever noticed?

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There's a shinpan who doesn't shout "te o tsuite" (hands down) but instead shouts "don't you dare".

There is a gyoji (mid juryo?) who, instead of calling "hakke-yoi", calls "pak-choi".

There is a gyoji (top sandanme?) Who doesn't say "nokotta, nokotta", but instead chants "oompa oompa".

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There's a shinpan who doesn't shout "te o tsuite" (hands down) but instead shouts "don't you dare".

There is a gyoji (mid juryo?) who, instead of calling "hakke-yoi", calls "pak-choi".

There is a gyoji (top sandanme?) Who doesn't say "nokotta, nokotta", but instead chants "oompa oompa".

no

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There's a shinpan who doesn't shout "te o tsuite" (hands down) but instead shouts "don't you dare".There is a gyoji (mid juryo?) who, instead of calling "hakke-yoi", calls "pak-choi".There is a gyoji (top sandanme?) Who doesn't say "nokotta, nokotta", but instead chants "oompa oompa".

I noticed the oompa-oompa guy before and thougt he might be a huge fan of german carneval marching bands.

Sometimes when listening to certain gyoji, I simply get hungry as they seem to shout "pannacotta pannacotta!" ;-)

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and there are a lot of Gyoji who love Britpop of the 70th, at the end of the bouts they call often: Showaddy.

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There's a shinpan who doesn't shout "te o tsuite" (hands down) but instead shouts "don't you dare".

There is a gyoji (mid juryo?) who, instead of calling "hakke-yoi", calls "pak-choi".

There is a gyoji (top sandanme?) Who doesn't say "nokotta, nokotta", but instead chants "oompa oompa".

no

Fair enough ;-)

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There's a shinpan who doesn't shout "te o tsuite" (hands down) but instead shouts "don't you dare".

There is a gyoji (mid juryo?) who, instead of calling "hakke-yoi", calls "pak-choi".

There is a gyoji (top sandanme?) Who doesn't say "nokotta, nokotta", but instead chants "oompa oompa".

The first two I don't particularly find odd (why not and one often can't follow what the gyoji way of pronunciation is), but the 3rd I always found weird.

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and yes, the sandanme gyoji you mentioned sounds ridiculous. is it possible that it's some kind of a regional pronunciation of the word?

Edited by Senkoho

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@ Senkoho :the Gyoji with the voice like a chicken who want to say it had got an egg was from Takanohana beya - Kimura Mitsunosuke.

I loved him.

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@ Senkoho :the Gyoji with the voice like a chicken who want to say it had got an egg was from Takanohana beya - Kimura Mitsunosuke.

I loved him.

You can hear his voice and some others at this page:

A lot of other gyoji will come soon

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The gyoji ... say "shobu ari" (we have a result).

Is that really what they usually say? I allways thought they say "owari" it's over.

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The gyoji ... say "shobu ari" (we have a result).

Is that really what they usually say? I allways thought they say "owari" it's over.

I thought shōri at first, but now I can hear the shōbu ari. And I hear it in that one match, too.

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This gyoji here has a very clear pronunciation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYMkKG_Up0A

Whithout any doubt one can clearly hear the "shoubu ari". Good to know better now. Thanks for this thread.

What's the first thing the gyoji is saying? Sounds like "mattarash", but I can't make anything out of it. Could someone explain?

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What's the first thing the gyoji is saying? Sounds like "mattarash", but I can't make anything out of it. Could someone explain?

when the gyoji looks closely at the rikishi, he often spots some scary skin irregularities which makes him shout

"what a rash!" ok, i'm just kiddin... ;-)

what he really says is

"matta nashi" (sometimes followed by "kamaete")

which means

"time is up" ("get ready")

The NHK TV announcers often comment

"seigen jikan ippai"

meaning:

"preparation time is over"

when the rikishi finish the shikiri rituals and turn to their corner for the last time before the bout starts.

You might want to check the sumo glossary section at the start page of this forum for this and other terms - you can browse for weeks there it is really huge!

Edited by kuroimori

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Thank you for your answere. "mattarashi" vs. "mattarashi" I wasn't really that far away. But your explanation at least makes sense. :)

I know the glossary and use it actually from time to time since sumo terminology is still quite new to me. Don't know, why I didn't look there first before asking this time. However on "mattanashi" there's a typo. The glossary writes it with a single t.

Generally I'm missing the Japanese writing for the lemmata in the glossary. I find that helpful if you know some Japanese like me. I started adding them to a local copy some time ago, but quit somewhere through letter b, it's quite a lot of work... If there would be a general interest in that, I might give it a second try though...

And thanks for answering the kamaete in advance. Actually I wanted to ask that too.

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However on "mattanashi" there's a typo. The glossary writes it with a single t.

Generally I'm missing the Japanese writing for the lemmata in the glossary. I find that helpful if you know some Japanese like me. I started adding them to a local copy some time ago, but quit somewhere through letter b, it's quite a lot of work... If there would be a general interest in that, I might give it a second try though...

And thanks for answering the kamaete in advance. Actually I wanted to ask that too.

no so fast - or should I say "mada mada"! ;-)

there are both versions, the first one (with the typo you mentioned)

but if you scrolled down just a bit further you find a second entry with correct transcription.

and just to mak sure about which is right, here is the original version:

待ったなし

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I've always figured that Gyoji-ese has the same relationship to Japanese as Baseball Umpirish has with English.

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