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Mongolian Wrestling (split from "Hakuho's rice promotion&quot

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Never assume that a top athlete of a sport can successfully compete in another sport (even a similar one) against athletes trained for it.

With no mawashi to grab, and the opponent allowed to run around all over the place, its a very different game... In this particular fight, the Mongolian Wrestler guy would have been thrown in seconds by most makushita rikishi, or pushed out by the rest. Without those options though, and with his set of rules, its another matter entirely :-)

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Never assume that a top athlete of a sport can successfully compete in another sport (even a similar one) against athletes trained for it.

With no mawashi to grab, and the opponent allowed to run around all over the place, its a very different game... In this particular fight, the Mongolian Wrestler guy would have been thrown in seconds by most makushita rikishi, or pushed out by the rest. Without those options though, and with his set of rules, its another matter entirely :-)

Yes, but why would a Yokozuna agree to wrestle with some nobody in the age of 'smart' phones when there is a chance that he could be beaten so embarrassingly? To see a great Yokozuna (one of the greatest in history) get thrown on his ass (in a rather clumsy and ugly fashion) by some unknown amateur wrestler is rather disappointing in my opinion.

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different sport ...

if you watch Hakuho beat a UFC superstar in a sumo bout would you be as impressed?

Hakuho is a Yokozuna in Sumo .... i could beat him in darts any day of the week for example.

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different sport ...

if you watch Hakuho beat a UFC superstar in a sumo bout would you be as impressed?

Hakuho is a Yokozuna in Sumo .... i could beat him in darts any day of the week for example.

If the UFC fighter was a grappler whose father was a former sumo Yokozuna....

Hakuho is a gifted man. He beats professional golfers at golf!

It is quite possible that he could beat you at darts.

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i get your logic but it remains a different sport. While Hakuho is doing sumo keiko these guys bust their asses with Mongolian wrestling.

and i doubt the fact that he can beat me in darts B-). I am certain i train more than him and i am rather competitive too. (In jonokuchi...)

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and i doubt the fact that he can beat me in darts B-). I am certain i train more than him and i am rather competitive too. (In jonokuchi...)

So you can take out 69 in two darts? ;-)

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Watching the fight video, I was 100% sure that Hak was not fighting seriously. It can be argued that he did this stunt roll in the end on purpose. Without knowing so much about the details of the different rules, I would think, with some preparation Hak would even be able to dominate Mongolian wrestling.

Doing all these things gets him a lot of sympathy from me and likely many others. Lending his popularity to sports clubs in his home country - I consider this great. I can imagine what it means to these adolescents to acutally have touched the mighty Yokozuna in distant Japan.

I hope the plans to plant rice in Mongolia work out. It might be that in hundred years this will be seen more relevant than his great Sumo carreer - "The wrestler who brought the rice." It definitely shows something. I mean, self-promotion is one side of the medal, the other one using his position in sports to actually give something to the world beyond the show.

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I heard Hakuho shouting it feels GOOOD in another video. And i really really thank him for doing this.

Why is it embarassing? It's a very different game and everyone knows there's not a single man from any other sport who can beat him in sumo.

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Two things to clarify.

Hakuho in this stunt is not even trying to fight. He has quite a background in Mongolian sumo and would be a formidable opponent if he competes for real. So are Asashoryu and Harumafuji.

These Mongolian wrestlers are by no means nobody amateuers. They are professional wretslers and are in fact going easy for this stunt as well. They have no shoes and upper body wear means it is just for Hakuho and fun.

Mongolian wrestlers of makuuchi equivalent would not be simple pushovers. After few matches they will quickly figure out how to handle it. Success of Mongolians in sumo has lot to do with Mongolian wrestling.

Hakuho would probably do very well in the said provinicial tournanment. But he will be no match against current top Mongolian wrestlers. The same was said about Asashoryu, and Harumafuji. The top guns simply know how to wear you down in an hour long battle.

However, if Hakuho switches to Mongolian wrestling and trains for it he will surely be one of the top wrestlers. He is just so good.

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Recently I've been scouring sources about Mongolian wrestling. After all, we will have our annual naadam, the biggest traditional sporting festival in just few days. The wrestling tournament this year will involve 1024 wrestlers, and it is the only basho this year. Unlike sumo, wrestlers have to wait another year if you lose just once in this tournament, making it the ultimate test of one's whole year worth of training. Ultimate competition in fact. Papers are reporting on how Mongolian wrestlers are honing their skills, and crafting their strategies for each and every bout. This is truly exciting time for all mongols, and thrilling build up to the naadam.

I've found one interesting fact that could be interesting to sumo fans. Asashoryu seriously thought about competing in naadam 3 years ago, and actually tested some waters. Sources tell that bukh (Mongolian wrestling) boffins secretly arranged a fights with aimgiin arslan (equivalent to top juryo of sumo) from Uvs province. The guy is up and coming wrestler who is known for toppling high ranking wrestlers frequently, yet he hasn't made it to makuuchi equivalent to this year either. In other words, Asashoryu's opponent was someone strong, dynamic but not exactly makuuchi regular. According to the sources, the secret arrangement involved three bouts between the two and it was reported that the matches were for real, nothing like the PR stunts we see here with Hakuho. Asashoryu has been soundly defeated in two of the three bouts, and his decision not to take part in naadam was based on this result, sources say. Even Asashoryu needs to battle his way from juryo equivalent in Mongolian wrestling.

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Recently I've been scouring sources about Mongolian wrestling. After all, we will have our annual naadam, the biggest traditional sporting festival in just few days.

Several years ago, we had several fascinating videos and commentary posted of the wrestling part of the naadam. I have lost track of them. It would be great if some of our Mongolian members would post some videos from this years naadam and some basic descriptions of the ranking system and basics of the match procedures.

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The wrestling tournament this year will involve 1024 wrestlers[...]

Is this some binary thing? The schedule's capacity can hold up to 1 Kwrestler, or some such?

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A "binary" number makes perfect sense for a single-elimination tournament, but you knew that of course...

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Recently I've been scouring sources about Mongolian wrestling. After all, we will have our annual naadam, the biggest traditional sporting festival in just few days.

Several years ago, we had several fascinating videos and commentary posted of the wrestling part of the naadam. I have lost track of them. It would be great if some of our Mongolian members would post some videos from this years naadam and some basic descriptions of the ranking system and basics of the match procedures.

Here is a link for a brief report how some of the devjee (beya) are preparing for the Naadam. Former yokozuna, kumusubi are acting as oyagata, training their students. At this stage training consists of physical recovery from the year long skills and power training, and plotting their plans, focusing on their opponents individually.

Ranking system in Mongolian wrestling goes from top to down like this (please correct me if I made errors here. This is basically what it looks like):

1. Darkhan avarga (dai yokozuna): 4 or more yusho

2. Dayan avrga (world yokozuna): 3 yusho

3. Avarga (national yokozuna): 2 yusho

4. Arslan (lion: ozeki): first yusho

5. Gardi (ozeki): jun yusho

6. Zaan (elephand: sekiwake): 7 wins in single elimination

7. Hartsaga (hawk: kumusubi): 6 wins in single elimination

8. Nachin (falcon: maegeshira): 5 wins in single elimination.

These are national titles, equivalent to makuuchi in japanese sumo. The titles are never demoted. Once you get it, you will keep it for life or advance to the next title.

These wrestlers all have multiple sponsors, endorsements, and many of them also compete in olympic judo, and free style wrestling as well. Mongolian first olympic gold medalist in 100kg judo currently stands at Hartsaga, which means he was able to win 6 rounds in the single elimination tournament.

Hakuho's father is former Darkhan avarga (dai yokozuna) with 6 yusho, five of them consecutive. In other words he reigned in for 5 years. He had to skip 3 Naadam due to competing in olympics, and world championships in free style wrestling. Otherwise he could have won 7-8 yusho.

Asashoryu's father is former Zaan, who was able to win 7 rounds in at least 3 Naadam. Hakuho's and Asashoryu's fathers competed in the same era. But Hakuho's father was unstoppable. Asashoryu's older brother is Avarga (yokozuna).

Harumafuji's father is also former Zaan, who was able to win 7 rounds in Naadam. His cousin is currently Gardi, who made sensation by winning 8 runds from upper juryo, and taking jun yusho. This year he is one of the favorites everybody is talking about. He is taller than Hakuho, and weighs around 145kg, has nuclear engineering degree. One to watch!

Mongolian wrestling used to have no time limit. There were several occasions when the last two standing wrestlers fought more than 4 hours (with water breaks of course). The president must reside over Naadam until the two finishes their bout and must hand down their titles. It became untenable to have no time limit. Currently, bouts for rounds 7 and up have 40 mins regulation time. At 40 mins, wrestler must compete from davhar shuudag grip (two hands on mawashi).

Mongolian wrestling takes place on an open field, no constraints on the dohyo. Any nice flat grass surface can be dohyo. Naadam is conducted on a soccer field in the central stadium.

There is no tachia, but wrestlers signify their readiness by facing each other with fighting posture. Both wrestlers must be ready, otherwise the other one can not attack.

The techniques vary a lot, but may resemble judo, sumo, free style wrestling. There is no pushing out, so the winning must be decisive and clear like uwatanage, or tsuriotoshi. Winning by single technique is extremely rare, so wrestlers usually do multiple tricks in just split second, combining everything. The same goes for the losing wrestler, who counterattacks with multiple tricks until it is over.

Cave painting found in Bayanhongor aimag of Mongolia is considered the oldest depiction of organized wrestling match, which shows two wrestlers in the center of spectators. Carbon dating established age of the painting at 7500 years.

I hope this helps anyone who wants to know more about mongolian wrestling.

Edited by wanderer
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Thanks for all that information! I, for one, find it extremely interesting and would be happy to learn more. Maybe a mod could move it to a separate thread? It is a bit buried here with a thread title like "Hakuho plants rice" :-)

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Maybe a mod could move it to a separate thread?

Done.

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Aww, I was having fun imagining that every rice plant that Hakuho plants springs up in 30 days as a mongolian wrestler.

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The wrestling tournament this year will involve 1024 wrestlers[...]

Is this some binary thing? The schedule's capacity can hold up to 1 Kwrestler, or some such?

Naadam wrestling tournament takes two days. First day is for the first 3 rounds, which will reduce the number of competitors from 1024 to 128.

The second day consists of the remaining 7 rounds, wich will halve the number of competitors each round. The last two are generally recognized as

the last two standing from the strongest of all Mongols. Climax of Naadam happens when one defeats the other, making him the absolute champion of the year, and sending his name into history books etc. He would have had to win 10 consecutive bouts in 2 days with increasingly strong opponents.

First Naadam recorded was during Hun Empire, some 2220 years ago. Mongol Empire has many records of Naadam (Chingis Khaan era, 800 years ago), and Naadam reached Stately status some time around year 1620. There are about 12 dai yokozuna in history of Mongolian wrestling, 4 are still alive today.

Edited by wanderer
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