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Mongolian Wrestling (split from "Hakuho's rice promotion&quot

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I thought I should post it here, the following is from another topic:

Bitter rivalry is not unheard of among mongolian wrestlers.

Hakuho's father was rather exuberant one and he had his rival in another legendary dai yokozuna. They are extremely close friends, in fact both representing the nation in olympics, both winning world championship medals together, spending countless nights training together etc.

On the Naadam dohyo though no one could help but wonder their bitter rivalry. The two rose to legendary status, history books simply refer to them as Two Munkhs, for their name both had Munkh.

Their rivalry is passed down to next generation of wrestlers. Today we have two schools of wrestling each founded by the two men.

This rivalry continues even today between the two old men who would occasionally through offensive words through media. Recent incident I heard was that Bayanmukh Avarga mildly hinted that his son is already Garid, ozeki equivalent while Munkhbat (Hakuho's father) didn't have any offspring to wrestle. This was of course before Hakuho rose to makuuchi and Hakuho's father bested his old rival when his son become Yokozuna. Then Bayanmukh avarga publicly criticized Munkhbat avarga for giving away his exceptionally talented son to japanese sumo, diluting the talent pool home. Munkhbat avarga vented his frustration by advising his rival not to repeat his mistake when it comes to himself also hinting that Bayanmukh didn't have any young son who could wrestle now. So the rivalry goes on.

But the two would surprise public every now and then with their passion towards each other. They will visit hospital when the other one is ill, they will sit together for TV interview, sometimes crying together. At Naadam, the two will show up mostly together smiling and talking. Such is their love.

Latest bad blood between mongolian wrestlers ensued when two young yokozuna emerged. One was hand picked by Hakuho's father from a remote province when he was a small child. The child's grandfather was another ancient dai Yokozuna who personally told Hakuho's father to take care of his grandson. The other young yokozuna came to prominence with support from Hakuho's father but defected to Bayanmunkh's camp by marrying his daughter. The two young Yokozuna are actually very close friends off dohyo since their teenage years yet they could almost kill each other at Naadam. Both became legendary Yokozuna though.

Such is the tale of rivalry and friendship in Mongolian wrestling.

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Soorry people, I keep posting things in different topic. This post should be in this topic:

You are absolutely right that things are not exactly the same in the two forms of wrestling. But I am finding it surprisingly useful here in this forum if I use sumo terminology. I don't need lenghty naratives to explain things. Say yusho, which is championship in Naadam. Do it once, you have ozeki, twice Yokozuna (avarga).
It probably is why mongolians are at ease when it comes to understanding sumo ranking system. Besides, I don't want to be overly rigid to explain everything in mongolian here. After all I encountered some japanese who claimed that sumo has roots in Mongolian wrestling. So I am just following the vibe.
So some more details then:
Jun yusho or runner up is called in Mongolian wrestling as uzuurleh
Winning 7 rounds which will make you Zaan (sekiwake) is called shuvgiin dorovt uldeh (literally means semifinalists)
Winning 6 rounds ikh shovog (quarter finalists)
Winning 5 rounds shovgoroh or taviin davaa will get you the lowest state title. Milestone for all, songs have been sang about taviin davaa and kind of like getting into makuuchi. Titles are never demoted except criminal offences so it is dream of every able man to at least get to the taviin davaa.
One thing that is very odd about Mongolian wrestling is that in rounds 3, 5 and up matches are not matched but chosen by wrestlers themselves according to thier rank. Highest ranking wrestler walks to referees and choses whoever he wants to fight. It may seem odd but it makes sense if you think more about it. This means that highest ranking ones pick the weakest ones because they earned the right to do so. It is called am avah. As a result the toughest two cookies are always left without being chosen by no one. It is called tunah. It is always these two who draw the biggest crowd in each round. It also is an ultimate litmust test for emerging stars, and they bragg about it. There are wrestlers who was never chosen by any one all the way from round 3 to semifinals. Nobody dared to chose him.

As you can see the weaklings quickly run dry by round 4 and am avah in itself becomes a drama. Who will the Yokozuna chose from these young wrestlers who are spewing testosterines on plain sight, filled with adrenaline, and are literally rattling their teeth like hungry wolves? The young ones do their best to intimidate the yokozuna and all this happens in plain sight in front of spectators. Tough situation. So the drama folds in this national favorite passtime.

Edited by wanderer
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Sources from Mongolia says Hakuho's anticipated participation in Tuv aimag Naadam was nothing but a rumor. Hakuho stated that there was no such plan, I didn't ask for permission from JSA, and I will not participate in Tuv Aimag Naadam.

We will soon know what is this hype all about. I personally did not believe such steps will be possible.

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One thing that is very odd about Mongolian wrestling is that in rounds 3, 5 and up matches are not matched but chosen by wrestlers themselves according to thier rank. Highest ranking wrestler walks to referees and choses whoever he wants to fight. It may seem odd but it makes sense if you think more about it. This means that highest ranking ones pick the weakest ones because they earned the right to do so. It is called am avah. As a result the toughest two cookies are always left without being chosen by no one. It is called tunah. It is always these two who draw the biggest crowd in each round. It also is an ultimate litmust test for emerging stars, and they bragg about it. There are wrestlers who was never chosen by any one all the way from round 3 to semifinals. Nobody dared to chose him.

That sounds really interesting, wanderer... The highest ranked wrestler picking his opponent and choosing the weakest sounds a bit like the seeding system used in tenis tournaments for example.

Although my guess is that if a similar system existed in Sumo, it would be considered very dishonorable for Hakuho to pick the weakest opponent. After all, Sumo is structured to make the best wrestlers fight each other, and having the Yokozuna fight the latest entry to the makuuchi ranks would not be within their mentality.

I find that cultural difference very interesting :-).

P.S. I really appreciate all the info you are giving us, thanks! As a note, however, I would also prefer if you used the original names for ranks (or translations, if those exist). From your own description it sounds like there is no analogy between Mongolian Wrestilng titles and Sumo ranks, so the "translation" of Avarga to Yokozuna and Zaan to Sekiwake is more confusing than helpful to me as well.

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Krindel, thanks for the comments. I will use Mongolian wrestling (bukh) terms more frequently.

Yes, bukh match scheduling is very different from that of sumo, but the end results are quite similar. It may seem not very honorable to us lay people, but for avarga things are not that simple.

He must have been through countless many tunaa in order to become avarga to start with, that is he must have been left with equally strong and young opponents in multiple rounds for many years. This is actually the most dreaded part for bukh. Many young promising perspectives actually stall, get injured, or simply become old, burning in these tunaa. Naadam takes pace just once a year, and you start getting in tunaa from round 3. If you want to get the lowest state title you will have to overcome at least 2 more tunaa. Advancing further will put you against exponentially stronger opponents. This is literally do or die situation.

As a result only the exceptional ones advance to high ranks in bukh. Trouble is not over even after you earned the right to chose. Avarga has to decide on his own and face its consecuences: choose the strongest, fight honorably and possibly be defeated and pass once in a year yusho chance? (you are getting older!) Or choose the weakest one on the face value and again possibly be defeated, not only passing once in a year chance, also dent his avarga honor for being not able to defeat his own choice?

In a way this is pretty harsh reality for avarga. All the spectators are smiling and praising him while pushing him towards his possible demise in his own choice. But some do manage to reign in for years. And that is why they are Darkhan Avarga (Giants).

For new comers it isn't easy that they have been avoided by avarga. Although that would be the ultimate testament to their rise, there is always someone equally young, hungry and unpredictable. So you are pitted against those one after one. Your fights are likely to take full 40 mins or more time because you are pretty equal and that will drain your energy before the next round. You have to do it at least 5 times in a single day just to be able to reach round 7 and inevitably face avarga. It may sound unfair to us but that is how all avarga become avarga. So the field is pretty even after all. That is why we have a saying: Defeating Avarga is the only way to become Avarga.

Edited by wanderer
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I guess you take my translations with little grain of salt. More knowledgeable person could post official translations here. But I hoped to give you an overall idea how it is like during the naadam, how long standing is this tradition and how naadam is more of a festival rather than a UFC type death match.

no grain of salt here ... i appreciated all of the translations and enjoyed the fact that i can understand more things of the whole naadam.

now really .... i will be there once in my life. Hopefully sooner rather than later.

Aderechelsea, if you want to spend some hours getting a taste of your future trip, there are clips from 2013 Naadam wrestling tournament from the Mongolian National Broadcaster on Youtube.

I think these start from the 6th round and end with the final 9th round and award ceremony. There might be some overlap between the clips, but its super great to watch. I watched almost the full 2 days in 2009 in UB. That year the final ended in near darkness.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4dNPfJUJ1Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWTyb5smn2U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW7SZWJi8FY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spCufWVQGCk

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Thanks Wanderer. Its all starting to make sense to me now. I have only competed once in a bokh tournament and the other time was just an exhibition match in a Japanese garden with Minaminoshima (ex makushita from Tonga). I think its the closest I want to get to being in a viral video. The Mongolians seem to love it and have have shared it around a lot on Facebook .I don't really mind being the sacrificial lamb otherwise we would look like a bullies against the smaller guys.

I think I know exactly what Hakuho was thinking in that recent clip. Without much to grab hold of a quick kotenage would be the answer but there is no point spoiling the fun. Without a mawashi the dynamics are totally different and you do need to know when to turn the power on and off when the bouts are longer.

What I love about the Mongolians is how wrestling is a part of their normal conversation.They can be chatting about something and then just start grappling each other.

I have seen at least a sculpture of a Mongolian wrestler lifting a horse but I'm not sure I believe the stories I was told about how they are given a foal to train with and they have to keep lifting it as it grows to make themselves stronger.

Tulgatsgaaya

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Thanks Wanderer. Its all starting to make sense to me now. I have only competed once in a bokh tournament and the other time was just an exhibition match in a Japanese garden with Minaminoshima (ex makushita from Tonga). I think its the closest I want to get to being in a viral video. The Mongolians seem to love it and have have shared it around a lot on Facebook .I don't really mind being the sacrificial lamb otherwise we would look like a bullies against the smaller guys.

Johnofuji, that is a great bout. Mongolian communities in countries like US, Germany, UK, Australia and South Korea have been celebrating naadam for many years. American Mongolians probably have the biggest naadam every year. There are 3 big Mongolian communities in the US: San-Francisco and Bay Area, Denver, and Washington DC. I was amazed at how big and totally authentic was Denver Naadam. Very reputable Mongolian wrestlers who happen to be visiting US or living in the US gather and the huchit bukhiin barildaan (Tournament of able wrestlers) in some years can be comparable to provincial level naadam in Mongolia itself.

In 2005, Denver Mongolian community requested certification of aimgiin arslan (provincial lion title is just one level below the lowest state title) title from Mongolian Wrestling Association authorities because their naadam this year featured 64 able wrestlers. This is one of the minimum requirements for which winner of this tournament could be considered for aimgiin arslan title. There were other requirements such as there should be at least 2 wrestlers with official titles. That requirement was also satisfied since there was one ulsiin nachin (state falcon) and one aimgiin arslan, one aimgiin zaan (all semi-retired though). This tournament must also be supervised by official member of Mongolian Wrestling Association. Famed Ulsiin Garid (runner up of State Naadam, retired) Sukhbat happened to be supervising that naadam. To my amazement, authorities back home granted aimgiin arslan title to the winner of this tournament. I am not sure if his title was officiated and registered by authorities back home but Mongolian community in Denver managed to hand him aimgiin arslan certificate and official pin. It will be quite something because every title is announced where the title was earned, which means appearance of this person must be announce as Aimgiin Arslan from Denver, Colorado of United States of America! Very funny.

Winner in this tournament was internationally recognized former judoka Bandi. His opponent and runner up was also internationally seeded free style wrestler who was training in the US.

So if you happen to be in one of these cities in the US around July 11, you may be able to officially compete in naadam. I saw several Americans participating.

Edited by wanderer
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Thanks Wanderer and Nishi Zeki,

I also had a recollection of another bourbon myth about feats of strength. Like the story of the fish that got away it probably grows with time. I can't recall exactly who it was but one of the early legends like Raiden or Tanikaze supposedly lifted up his horse above his head so a passing daimyo could get by on a narrow path???

Wanderer- What is Arslan was going to be my next question so thanks for that. Unfortunately I missed last weeks Mongolian festival here in Sydney. I get notifications but its hard with no online translator. I suppose it was fortunate for the spectators because the bokh gear just doesn't hold the wobbly bits in as well as a mawashi.

In May we were expecting a big contingent from Mongolia including contortionists and Horse fiddlers (whatever they are) but their visas got denied. I have no idea who paid for their tickets in Mongolia but I got called upon by the local Mongolian chief (what are they called?) to organise the venue and a tournament at short notice. Some of the big names we were expecting are in the list below but most of them are alphabet soup to me.

1. Munkhbat Sukhbaatar (National wrestling Champion)

2. Ganbat Batjargal (National wrestling Arslan),

3. Burentugs Purev (National wrestling Arslan)

4. Bat-Orshikh Ulziitogtokh

5. Byambajav Arslan

6. Ganbold Jantsan

7. Tserenkhuu Tsedev

8. Batsuuri Baatar

9. Gantulga Oyun

10. Ganzorig Namsrai

11. Ganbold Badamsambuu

12. Tugsjargal Tsedendorj

13. Sainbayar Sainjargal

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Thanks Wanderer and Nishi Zeki,

I also had a recollection of another bourbon myth about feats of strength. Like the story of the fish that got away it probably grows with time. I can't recall exactly who it was but one of the early legends like Raiden or Tanikaze supposedly lifted up his horse above his head so a passing daimyo could get by on a narrow path???

Wanderer- What is Arslan was going to be my next question so thanks for that. Unfortunately I missed last weeks Mongolian festival here in Sydney. I get notifications but its hard with no online translator. I suppose it was fortunate for the spectators because the bokh gear just doesn't hold the wobbly bits in as well as a mawashi.

In May we were expecting a big contingent from Mongolia including contortionists and Horse fiddlers (whatever they are) but their visas got denied. I have no idea who paid for their tickets in Mongolia but I got called upon by the local Mongolian chief (what are they called?) to organise the venue and a tournament at short notice. Some of the big names we were expecting are in the list below but most of them are alphabet soup to me.

1. Munkhbat Sukhbaatar (National wrestling Champion)

2. Ganbat Batjargal (National wrestling Arslan),

3. Burentugs Purev (National wrestling Arslan)

4. Bat-Orshikh Ulziitogtokh

5. Byambajav Arslan

6. Ganbold Jantsan

7. Tserenkhuu Tsedev

8. Batsuuri Baatar

9. Gantulga Oyun

10. Ganzorig Namsrai

11. Ganbold Badamsambuu

12. Tugsjargal Tsedendorj

13. Sainbayar Sainjargal

Johnofuji,

If it is true, these names are big. We are talking about one Yokozuna, 2 ozeki and many other famed wrestlers. I don't understand why they would want to go to Sydney if their exhibition tour was not arranged at formal level, and why their visas would be denied.

Understandably, Mongolian wrestling is full of myths about superhuman strengths. Interestingly, it is very rare that avarga are associated with such myths. That is probably their reputation are well recorded.

Nicknaming wrestlers is one of the long held traditions in Mongolian wrestling. Wrestlers are nicknamed by their strengths or skills, even by their appearance and that nickname stays. In older times nicknames were included in the official announcement: tsol duudah. In line with mythical strengths discussed here, it was possible to hear some wrestlers being announced like:

Camel lifter, horse thrower, long armed, red necked Deleg, wolf Danzan, bull lifter Jamyan, feisty, leg grabber, big Sanjaa, black, small, slow, single sided ... etc. Funny.

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Are there professional Mongolian wrestlers in the sense that they do not have any occupation besides wrestling or teaching it?

I always assumed no but I did not find any explicit mention of it.

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Are there professional Mongolian wrestlers in the sense that they do not have any occupation besides wrestling or teaching it?

I always assumed no but I did not find any explicit mention of it.

In recent years, a decade or so, there are increasing number of Mongolian wrestlers who do it for a living sponsored by companies. Traditionally, they used to have some kind of phony position or employment such as police officer, university student, etc. just like olympic athletes in many countries. They train year around though.

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Thanks Wanderer and Nishi Zeki,

I also had a recollection of another bourbon myth about feats of strength. Like the story of the fish that got away it probably grows with time. I can't recall exactly who it was but one of the early legends like Raiden or Tanikaze supposedly lifted up his horse above his head so a passing daimyo could get by on a narrow path???

Wanderer- What is Arslan was going to be my next question so thanks for that. Unfortunately I missed last weeks Mongolian festival here in Sydney. I get notifications but its hard with no online translator. I suppose it was fortunate for the spectators because the bokh gear just doesn't hold the wobbly bits in as well as a mawashi.

In May we were expecting a big contingent from Mongolia including contortionists and Horse fiddlers (whatever they are) but their visas got denied. I have no idea who paid for their tickets in Mongolia but I got called upon by the local Mongolian chief (what are they called?) to organise the venue and a tournament at short notice. Some of the big names we were expecting are in the list below but most of them are alphabet soup to me.

1. Munkhbat Sukhbaatar (National wrestling Champion)

2. Ganbat Batjargal (National wrestling Arslan),

3. Burentugs Purev (National wrestling Arslan)

4. Bat-Orshikh Ulziitogtokh

5. Byambajav Arslan

6. Ganbold Jantsan

7. Tserenkhuu Tsedev

8. Batsuuri Baatar

9. Gantulga Oyun

10. Ganzorig Namsrai

11. Ganbold Badamsambuu

12. Tugsjargal Tsedendorj

13. Sainbayar Sainjargal

Johnofuji,

If it is true, these names are big. We are talking about one Yokozuna, 2 ozeki and many other famed wrestlers. I don't understand why they would want to go to Sydney if their exhibition tour was not arranged at formal level, and why their visas would be denied.

Understandably, Mongolian wrestling is full of myths about superhuman strengths. Interestingly, it is very rare that avarga are associated with such myths. That is probably their reputation are well recorded.

Nicknaming wrestlers is one of the long held traditions in Mongolian wrestling. Wrestlers are nicknamed by their strengths or skills, even by their appearance and that nickname stays. In older times nicknames were included in the official announcement: tsol duudah. In line with mythical strengths discussed here, it was possible to hear some wrestlers being announced like:

Camel lifter, horse thrower, long armed, red necked Deleg, wolf Danzan, bull lifter Jamyan, feisty, leg grabber, big Sanjaa, black, small, slow, single sided ... etc. Funny.

Yes that is the list we were sent. Katrina had to prepare an official letter of invitation for them to apply for their visa's. Beijing didn't give us an explanation as to why they got knocked back. It is a mystery to me who paid for their tickets but I can find out (possibly it was someone like the oil baron who looked after everyone in Korea at the World Ssireum Championships (beach sumo) .

The local Mongolians didn't really have the funding or resources to host them in the manner they deserve so it was kind of a relief but disappointing that we miss out on such a rare and interesting opportunity. Some of them were going to be billeted out the "back of buggery" as we say (ie a long way from the city centre).

I was looking forward to their workshops and seeing how our mad Scottish wrestler would go against them. They made him an honorary Mongolian when he beat them all last year. His style matches bokh quite well because the loose jackets they use mean they have to be good at hip throws which are even easier with more grab on to with the tighter mongolian jackets.

They sent out a group earlier in the year on a reconnaissance mission and they met up with one of my fellow Ozsumo mates Gavin Dickson works hard on bringing traditional wrestling styles together. He has written a book called From Dreaming to Dreamers http://sidharta.com/books/index.jsp;jsessionid=3D058244932AAFFCB6333B6A1ED53F66?uid=66.

I love the nicknames. I had to give a list of names when we went on tour with the local Mongolians last time. They didn't provide them in time so I used some from the list below knowing that the rural council wouldn't need to check up on them.

"From a list of historical clans compiled by the head of the Mongolian State Library to assist Mongolians in choosing clan names. In the 1920s the Communist government eliminated clan names in a campaign to destroy the country’s hereditary aristocracy and class structure. As the population grew and became more urban, however, the one-name system led to confusion and inadvertent intermarrying, and currently all Mongolians are required to register clan names. Translated from the Khalkha Mongolian by Andrew Shimunek. Originally from Harper's Magazine, October 2004."

Argalchin: collectors of dried dung

Ayagachin: those who make cups and bowls

Baast: poopy, fecal

Baga dogshin: the lesser ruthless ones

Bagtaamal: the included ones

Bayajikh: those who are getting rich

Böösniikhön: the descendants of lice

Chiwchin: those who neuter bulls

Dairtan: those with saddle sores

Duutan: the vociferous ones

Emgenüüd: the old ladies

Galzuud: the insane ones

Güjir: the stubborn ones

Günger: those who mumble

Khachid: the weird ones

Kholidog: those who always mix

Khorkhoi nüdten: those with bug eyes

Khünbish: the not humans

Khurlagad: those whose animals grow fat later than others

Lalaryn guchid: the great-great-grandchildren of the one-eyed ogre

Mogoi nüdten: those with snake eyes

Nütsged: the naked ones

Öndögiinkhön: those of the egg

Sawsag doloon: the wanton seven

Shaawai: the well-dressed ones

Showkhnar: the coneheads

Shüdgüi: the toothless ones

Solgoi: the left-handed ones

Takhiankhan: those of the chicken

Tongoruud: the upside-down ones

Tursaga: the skins of animals that have starved to death

Ukhaanuud: the intelligent ones

Ulaan yamaat: those having red goats

Uu: drink!

Zalkhuus: the lazy ones

Zazgar: those with small, hairy bodies

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Thanks Wanderer and Nishi Zeki,

I also had a recollection of another bourbon myth about feats of strength. Like the story of the fish that got away it probably grows with time. I can't recall exactly who it was but one of the early legends like Raiden or Tanikaze supposedly lifted up his horse above his head so a passing daimyo could get by on a narrow path???

Wanderer- What is Arslan was going to be my next question so thanks for that. Unfortunately I missed last weeks Mongolian festival here in Sydney. I get notifications but its hard with no online translator. I suppose it was fortunate for the spectators because the bokh gear just doesn't hold the wobbly bits in as well as a mawashi.

In May we were expecting a big contingent from Mongolia including contortionists and Horse fiddlers (whatever they are) but their visas got denied. I have no idea who paid for their tickets in Mongolia but I got called upon by the local Mongolian chief (what are they called?) to organise the venue and a tournament at short notice. Some of the big names we were expecting are in the list below but most of them are alphabet soup to me.

1. Munkhbat Sukhbaatar (National wrestling Champion)

2. Ganbat Batjargal (National wrestling Arslan),

3. Burentugs Purev (National wrestling Arslan)

4. Bat-Orshikh Ulziitogtokh

5. Byambajav Arslan

6. Ganbold Jantsan

7. Tserenkhuu Tsedev

8. Batsuuri Baatar

9. Gantulga Oyun

10. Ganzorig Namsrai

11. Ganbold Badamsambuu

12. Tugsjargal Tsedendorj

13. Sainbayar Sainjargal

Johnofuji,

If it is true, these names are big. We are talking about one Yokozuna, 2 ozeki and many other famed wrestlers. I don't understand why they would want to go to Sydney if their exhibition tour was not arranged at formal level, and why their visas would be denied.

Understandably, Mongolian wrestling is full of myths about superhuman strengths. Interestingly, it is very rare that avarga are associated with such myths. That is probably their reputation are well recorded.

Nicknaming wrestlers is one of the long held traditions in Mongolian wrestling. Wrestlers are nicknamed by their strengths or skills, even by their appearance and that nickname stays. In older times nicknames were included in the official announcement: tsol duudah. In line with mythical strengths discussed here, it was possible to hear some wrestlers being announced like:

Camel lifter, horse thrower, long armed, red necked Deleg, wolf Danzan, bull lifter Jamyan, feisty, leg grabber, big Sanjaa, black, small, slow, single sided ... etc. Funny.

Yes that is the list we were sent. Katrina had to prepare an official letter of invitation for them to apply for their visa's. Beijing didn't give us an explanation as to why they got knocked back. It is a mystery to me who paid for their tickets but I can find out (possibly it was someone like the oil baron who looked after everyone in Korea at the World Ssireum Championships (beach sumo) .

The local Mongolians didn't really have the funding or resources to host them in the manner they deserve so it was kind of a relief but disappointing that we miss out on such a rare and interesting opportunity. Some of them were going to be billeted out the "back of buggery" as we say (ie a long way from the city centre).

I was looking forward to their workshops and seeing how our mad Scottish wrestler would go against them. They made him an honorary Mongolian when he beat them all last year. His style matches bokh quite well because the loose jackets they use mean they have to be good at hip throws which are even easier with more grab on to with the tighter mongolian jackets.

They sent out a group earlier in the year on a reconnaissance mission and they met up with one of my fellow Ozsumo mates Gavin Dickson works hard on bringing traditional wrestling styles together. He has written a book called From Dreaming to Dreamers http://sidharta.com/books/index.jsp;jsessionid=3D058244932AAFFCB6333B6A1ED53F66?uid=66.

I love the nicknames. I had to give a list of names when we went on tour with the local Mongolians last time. They didn't provide them in time so I used some from the list below knowing that the rural council wouldn't need to check up on them.

"From a list of historical clans compiled by the head of the Mongolian State Library to assist Mongolians in choosing clan names. In the 1920s the Communist government eliminated clan names in a campaign to destroy the country’s hereditary aristocracy and class structure. As the population grew and became more urban, however, the one-name system led to confusion and inadvertent intermarrying, and currently all Mongolians are required to register clan names. Translated from the Khalkha Mongolian by Andrew Shimunek. Originally from Harper's Magazine, October 2004."

Argalchin: collectors of dried dung

Ayagachin: those who make cups and bowls

Baast: poopy, fecal

Baga dogshin: the lesser ruthless ones

Bagtaamal: the included ones

Bayajikh: those who are getting rich

Böösniikhön: the descendants of lice

Chiwchin: those who neuter bulls

Dairtan: those with saddle sores

Duutan: the vociferous ones

Emgenüüd: the old ladies

Galzuud: the insane ones

Güjir: the stubborn ones

Günger: those who mumble

Khachid: the weird ones

Kholidog: those who always mix

Khorkhoi nüdten: those with bug eyes

Khünbish: the not humans

Khurlagad: those whose animals grow fat later than others

Lalaryn guchid: the great-great-grandchildren of the one-eyed ogre

Mogoi nüdten: those with snake eyes

Nütsged: the naked ones

Öndögiinkhön: those of the egg

Sawsag doloon: the wanton seven

Shaawai: the well-dressed ones

Showkhnar: the coneheads

Shüdgüi: the toothless ones

Solgoi: the left-handed ones

Takhiankhan: those of the chicken

Tongoruud: the upside-down ones

Tursaga: the skins of animals that have starved to death

Ukhaanuud: the intelligent ones

Ulaan yamaat: those having red goats

Uu: drink!

Zalkhuus: the lazy ones

Zazgar: those with small, hairy bodies

Very interesting post indeed. I have never seen this list of clan names. Most of them unheard of to my knowledge.

My friend from Ireland told me that his last name Haycock wasn't very impressive name, although he himself is a real magnet of girls. So names from old times can indeed be strange ones.

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Yes that is the list we were sent. Katrina had to prepare an official letter of invitation for them to apply for their visa's. Beijing didn't give us an explanation as to why they got knocked back. It is a mystery to me who paid for their tickets but I can find out (possibly it was someone like the oil baron who looked after everyone in Korea at the World Ssireum Championships (beach sumo) .

perhaps - if coming through China there was something put in place after a number of Mongolians vanished in Japan (about 2005 /6) when over on Sakai.

Immigration info on these issues is shared between states in the NE Asian area so the Chinese could have seen them as a flight risk if in the land of slip, slop and slappers?

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Focus on Asashoryu's brother, also judo, a pot-pourri of special techniques. In the end also some sumo by Asashoryu .

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