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Masumasumasu

Beginning my study of kanji. Any advice?

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Any advice regarding kanji or the study of the Japanese language would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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do not use sumo to learn kanji. The readings are oftentimes skewed in relation to readings in the real world.

Immerse yourself, open mind, but before you try kanji make sure you know hiragana and katakana first.

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1.Start by learning the language, i.e. learning to speak.

2. Learn hiragana and katakana first

3. Only after being able to get along with the first two, would I learn kanji.

4. But hey, that's me.

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Thank you both. Yes, I know hiragana/katakana and I am currently learning the kanji radicals.

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You will need frequent reinforcement to hold those kanji in your memory. If you live in Japan, this is easy. If not, you must make extra efforts to read and reread the kanji you are learning as often as possible.

Listen to Japanese whenever possible. It will help you to imagine the proper reading for the words you will be learning. Your memory of these kanji will be richer if you can hear them properly in your head as you see them.

Learn to write the kanji you are learning. This creates an extra layer of memory. It will also help you to distinguish between similar looking kanji.

Don't try to learn kanji in isolation. Learn several words using the target kanji and read sentences using those words. This will help to internalize the proper context for their use.

Good luck!

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You will need frequent reinforcement to hold those kanji in your memory. If you live in Japan, this is easy. If not, you must make extra efforts to read and reread the kanji you are learning as often as possible.

Listen to Japanese whenever possible. It will help you to imagine the proper reading for the words you will be learning. Your memory of these kanji will be richer if you can hear them properly in your head as you see them.

Learn to write the kanji you are learning. This creates an extra layer of memory. It will also help you to distinguish between similar looking kanji.

Don't try to learn kanji in isolation. Learn several words using the target kanji and read sentences using those words. This will help to internalize the proper context for their use.

Good luck!

Thank you, Itachi.

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I recommend the Heisig method. It's sort of controversial and it's not for everybody, but personally I got good results by doing Heisig with the online tools here: http://kanji.koohii.com/

The forums at that site are also a good resource for kanji study.

I struggled with kanji for about 5 years and made no good progress until I devoted myself to this method.

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I recommend the Heisig method. It's sort of controversial and it's not for everybody, but personally I got good results by doing Heisig with the online tools here: http://kanji.koohii.com/

The forums at that site are also a good resource for kanji study.

I struggled with kanji for about 5 years and made no good progress until I devoted myself to this method.

Thanks, Umigame...I'll give that a try.

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Learn to write the kanji you are learning. This creates an extra layer of memory. It will also help you to distinguish between similar looking kanji.

This is the best way, but I prefer the computer based easy way. Use the wapro Japanese Input functions of your computer and learn to recognize the right Kanji in the list displayed. Use an easy text in connection with the Rikai-chan add-on in Firefox to see the pronunciation and meaning. Later even the sumo banzuke - switch between Japanese and English on sumoreference.

You can also play around with the reduced net version of my own Kanji-Database connections in Kanji-kun (was a Hypercard stack), but I'm afraid it is mixed German/English and without Help (not all index connections work as well).

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Later even the sumo banzuke - switch between Japanese and English on sumoreference.

There's no need to switch. Just stay on the Japanese page and go with the mouse over the shikona. A hint will appear starting with the hiragana reading. Hiragana is better than romaji for studying anyway.

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FWIW, when I arrived in Japan with a daily teaching job, I memorized the next two stations on the line as I was going to work and going home. Naturally I also revised the previous station names I had learned. After one month I could navigate myself round central Tokyo.

I was also studying the basic kanji book of the time -- but after a year I noticed that this was heavy on nouns and adjectives and short on verbs. So I found I was constantly being confronted with notices that read "Danger!! It is dangerous to xxx by the pond!!" and I had no idea what not to do. That was when I branched out into wider studies.

Personally, as a language person, I have never found a substitute for work -- but of course this assumes that you already have the basic feeling for how to do it.

Good luck anyway!

Orion et ego in arcadia....

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Use an easy text in connection with the Rikai-chan add-on in Firefox to see the pronunciation and meaning. Later even the sumo banzuke - switch between Japanese and English on sumoreference.

There's no need to switch. Just stay on the Japanese page and go with the mouse over the shikona. A hint will appear starting with the hiragana reading. Hiragana is better than romaji for studying anyway.

But it doesn't work when Rikai-chan is enabled.

And to put even more emphasis on sumo, not forget Rikishi Talk By Kyokuhagyo.

He posts English with the Kanji text - and with Rikai-chan don't forget the to activate the Close Lookupbar. Copy/Paste from the text and it displays the Kanji in big in a Kanji card fashion.

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Use an easy text in connection with the Rikai-chan add-on in Firefox to see the pronunciation and meaning. Later even the sumo banzuke - switch between Japanese and English on sumoreference.

There's no need to switch. Just stay on the Japanese page and go with the mouse over the shikona. A hint will appear starting with the hiragana reading. Hiragana is better than romaji for studying anyway.

But it doesn't work when Rikai-chan is enabled.

Hm, works totally prefect for me. Mouseover gives the hint below the shikona and Rikaichan even a bit lower, all perfectly readable.

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Indeed, it just takes a while to appear. I was too hasty. I thought it had to be disabled Rikai-chan and using just the Close Lookupbar.

Edited by Akinomaki

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