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Jaak

Old kimarite

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Where can information be found as to what the old kimarite were, and what has happened to them?

Azukari - last happened 1951.09 between Y Azumafuji and O Yoshibayama. Seems to be formally abolished - if a match ends inconclusively, a torinaoshi follows.

Dakidashi - last 1943.01?

Dashinage - last 1966.11?

Dohineri - last 1951.01?

Fumikiri - last 1945.06?

Fumikoshi - last 1954.03?

Gyakuhineri - last 1937.05?

Hakite - only time 1933.05?

Haraidashi - only time 1951.09?

Harayagura - only time 1938.05?

Hatakiotoshi - last 1949.01?

Hikitaoshi - only time 1949.01?

Hikiwake - a type of draw. Last happened 1974.09 between M6 Futagodake and M10 Mienoumi.

7 occurrences between 1958 and 1967. Has it been abolished?

Hineri - last 1938.01?

Hineritaoshi - last 1927.05?

Hisagomawashi - only time 1941.05?

Itamiwake - a type of draw. 18 occurrences between 1927.01 and 1958.09, all in makuuchi and juryo - then no occurrences in 35 years - but then 3 occurrences between 1994.03 and 1999.01, all in 3 lower divisions (jonokuchi, jonidan, sandanme). Has it been abolished or not?

Izumigawa - last 1928.10?

Kakaenage - last 1952.05?

Kakemotare - last 1950.01?

Kaketaoshi - only time 1927.03?

Karaminage - last 1953.05?

Kerinage - only time 1957.03?

Kimekatsugi - only time 1929.09?

Kubihataki - last 1944.01?

Mochidashi - last 1951.01?

Morotehineri - last 1954.01?

Motarekomi - last 1951.09?

Nichogake - only time 1953.01?

Nisokugake - only time 1937.01?

Nodowa - only time 1951.01?

Nukitasuki - only time 1948.10?

Omatasukui - only time 1951.01?

Oshihanashi - last 1937.05?

Oshikiri - last 1953.03?

Owatashi - last 1951.01?

Sakatenage - only time 1927.01?

Samagataeshi - only time 1953.09?

Shitateyagura - last 1951.09?

Sori - last 1931.01?

Takamuso - last 1934.01?

Tobichigai - last 1942.05?

Tomoenage - the only time 1957.03?

Tsukihanashi - last 1956.01?

Tsukiyagura - only time 1938.01?

Uchirohikimawashi - only time 1950.09?

Uwateyagura - last 1954.09?

Yagaranage - last 1940.05?

Yasumi - a type of draw, last occurred in 1928.01?

Yobikaeshi - last 1958.03?

Yoridashi - last 1954.09?

Zutsuki - only time 1939.05?

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I would be very interested in knowing what these are, and most of them should be brought back

Uchirohikimawashi - Inside Belt Pull?

Dashinage - Throw Out

Yagaranage Is A Yaguranage Typo

Haraidashi - Sweep Push? Sweep Out

Some of these seem more like Shikona than Kimarite (SpookyTVprogram...)

 

 

Edited by PawnSums

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I'm as much a kimarite freak as the next sumo otaku, but I don't really know what those are. It's easy to make an educated guess, though. Ushirohikimawashi would be anything that wins you the bout by pulling on the opponent's mawashi when he got behind you. Dashinage was probably refined into uwate- and shitatedashinage; there's also the chance, and it would make a lot of sense, that the unfinished throws we sometimes see today, which don't outright fell the other guy to the ground, but take him off balance just enough to be taken out, were called dashinage in the past. No idea about yagara, but haraidashi could be sweeping an opponent's leg(s) just enough to make him step out.

In any case, kimarite naming, either creating classes or applying those classifications to real instances of winning techniques, is far from an exact science, it's more of an art form.

Many, many times, the bout is won through a succession of strategies, tactics and a sequence of attempted moves, so much that the single kimarite at the end is irrelevant or even detracts from the overall impression.

Other times, the finishing kimarite is an overlap of two or more finishing moves, either because they involve very similar stances/actions, like oshidashi and tsukidashi, or that thing Harumafuji did which could be seen as kotenage, tottari or hikkake, but which was nearly impossible to classify because of the low stance and the aggressive flow of the bout, or because one is a natural consequence from the other one not being properly executed or finished, e.g. a dashinage degenerating into okuridashi/taoshi, sukuinage into tsukiotoshi, etc.

Philosophy aside, though, I would also like to see some books of old with "formal" descriptions for the obsolete techniques. I would also be interested in seeing some "official" explanations for their obsolescence (I'm not really holding my breath, but hey, maybe, just maybe...)

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There was no standardized kimarite canon in those days, they just made it up as they went along. Doubtful that the techniques that failed to make the cut for the official standardization in 1955 ever had formalized descriptions.

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Hey Asashosakari, is there any source on the internet that recognizes official kimarite standardization in 1955? I don't doubt that you're correct because you're right about a lot of things on this forum, but I haven't found any articles or anything on Google Scholar or JSTOR that tie standardization to that date. I'm trying to find a "modern" date cutoff for kimarite statistics. Let me know if you can find anything!

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On 10/10/2019 at 03:11, mt fuji said:

Hey Asashosakari, is there any source on the internet that recognizes official kimarite standardization in 1955? I don't doubt that you're correct because you're right about a lot of things on this forum, but I haven't found any articles or anything on Google Scholar or JSTOR that tie standardization to that date. I'm trying to find a "modern" date cutoff for kimarite statistics. Let me know if you can find anything!

I'm actually not sure if I had any other source than the Japanese Wikipedia article on kimarite when I wrote that back then. Summarizing what's written there: Due to inconsistent reporting by the media [i.e. the reporters called the kimarite as they saw them], the Kyokai decided in 1955 to create a standardized list of 68 kimarite and 2 non-techniques (isamiashi and koshikudake) and to start announcing them formally in the arena, as well as publish the kimarite as part of the hoshitori for the sekitori divisions. Further, in 1960 they decided to split up dashinage into the uwate and shitate versions, and kawazugake was newly recognized as distinct from kirikaeshi, yielding the list of 70 techniques that remained in effect for the next four decades until further additions in 2000/2001 gave the current 82 kimarite + 5 non-techniques.

I'm not sure scholarly sources will have much of anything, to be honest. The Japanese Wikipedia is much less referenced than the English version in general, but where articles on sumo history do have references, they're often references to sumo magazines from the last ~25 years, which have run articles on historical topics from time to time. Anyway, googling around for the 1955 date does bring up a few things, such as a summary of a Sumo Museum display a few years back on the Kyokai's own website, and a result from some collaborative library referencing project which refers to the Sumo Daijiten encyclopedia, stating an exact date of May 1955, and also mentions an earlier standardization effort to 56 techniques in 1935 (I suspect that one wasn't that effective).

Maybe somebody who owns the Daijiten can take a look to see what it says in detail.

Of course the records on the DB show several appearances of unrecognized kimarite even beyond 1955 - I don't know if that means the Kyokai's own personnel was lax in applying the official list for a few years, or if it indicates that some of the DB's data originated in secondary sources that took a while to start adhering to the Kyokai's new standards. (Some of them may also be simple errors in the data, such as the final appearance of dashinage in 1966.)

 

Edited by Asashosakari
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On 12/10/2019 at 22:14, Asashosakari said:

I'm actually not sure if I had any other source than the Japanese Wikipedia article on kimarite when I wrote that back then. Summarizing what's written there: Due to inconsistent reporting by the media [i.e. the reporters called the kimarite as they saw them], the Kyokai decided in 1955 to create a standardized list of 68 kimarite and 2 non-techniques (isamiashi and koshikudake) and to start announcing them formally in the arena, as well as publish the kimarite as part of the hoshitori for the sekitori divisions. Further, in 1960 they decided to split up dashinage into the uwate and shitate versions, and kawazugake was newly recognized as distinct from kirikaeshi, yielding the list of 70 techniques that remained in effect for the next four decades until further additions in 2000/2001 gave the current 82 kimarite + 5 non-techniques.

I'm not sure scholarly sources will have much of anything, to be honest. The Japanese Wikipedia is much less referenced than the English version in general, but where articles on sumo history do have references, they're often references to sumo magazines from the last ~25 years, which have run articles on historical topics from time to time. Anyway, googling around for the 1955 date does bring up a few things, such as a summary of a Sumo Museum display a few years back on the Kyokai's own website, and a result from some collaborative library referencing project which refers to the Sumo Daijiten encyclopedia, stating an exact date of May 1955, and also mentions an earlier standardization effort to 56 techniques in 1935 (I suspect that one wasn't that effective).

Maybe somebody who owns the Daijiten can take a look to see what it says in detail.

The daijiten lists the same details - 1935 the 56 and then May 1955 the 68 - no reason given, then January 1960 the dashinage split + kawazukake to make 70. Only for the reform in 2000/1 implemented for Hatsu 2001 a reason is given: because speed and physical appearance of the rikishi had changed and techniques that didn't fit into the list of 70 could be seen.

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I am posting images of six ceramic coasters I have that illustrate old kimarite.  One is mitokorozeme which is still on the kimarite list.  One is tobichigahi (= tobichigai above?).  This specific coaster is my favorite.

05.jpg01.jpg04.jpg

02.jpg03.jpg06.jpg

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35 minutes ago, Obana said:

I am posting images of six ceramic coasters I have that illustrate old kimarite.  One is mitokorozeme which is still on the kimarite list.  One is tobichigahi (= tobichigai above?).  This specific coaster is my favorite.

05.jpg01.jpg04.jpg

02.jpg03.jpg06.jpg

In order:

Tobichigai

Ōwatashi

Midokorotsume

Shikikomata

Tamedashi

Kekaeshi

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