Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Mark.Buckton

16 posts in this topic

Time to cut back on the self-promotion again, methinks...an announcement of an interview not yet given? Sheesh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the comment there Pierre. :-)

Just trying to expand on the Sumo Spring launched by @araibira and JVB of late.

Will actually have pieces in a Czech and a Brazilian newpaper soon after the basho too but those details are on another PC - will link later.

Enjoy Day 11.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it a jynx ? We'll know in a couple of days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30 mins interview - all done now. With predictions and opinions.

See what comes out. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, Mark. Time to take a breath and give the chest-thumping a break.

This isn't so much a Sumo Spring as it is a Mark Buckton Spring.

I listened to significant portions of two programs, to a total of about 45 minutes each program. What I heard was mostly chatter about starfish, beer, laundry, beer, tweets, more beer, some emails, beer, and once in a while, some action on the dohyo. In two cases, once each broadcast, a sumo bout was entirely overlooked. The Wakanosato-Aoiyama bout on one day, and I forget the one on the other day. If I was relying on the broadcast for a description of the action in the ring, I would be sorely disappointed. Considering you say you have extensive knowledge and background in this field, I expected a more complete, prepared and informative program. THAT would have been a Sumo Spring, indeed.

If you're going to do something like this, do it right. None of the "low and slow, grab another brew" stuff... And seriously, learn how to do a proper play-by-play. Keep your eye on the dohyo. Use your words to paint a mental picture for the listener. Vary your voice. Did you take the time to hear a tape of your broadcast? If you want to do this properly, spend a few hours listening to your own voice, and experiment with voice infection.

I did 2 years on radio. The first thing they teach you is to be prepared. Not scripted, but prepared, And NEVER more than 2 seconds of silence. Silence is deadly. And be aware of the action. You have an excellent voice for this. Don't treat the show like it's a cozy get-together, unless that's what you want out of it. If so, don't call it a Sumo show if there's less than 80% sumo material.

I don't care if you call it the Mark Buckton Show. Then that's perfectly fine. But don't call it the Sumo Spring, because from what I heard, that title is waaayyyy too misleading.

P.S., Good comments and compliments about the show usually come from other people, the ones who listen to the show. Not usually from the Show's host.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I was relying on the broadcast for a description of the action in the ring, I would be sorely disappointed.

Were you? Was anyone? Wasn't it meant as a supplement to the NSK stream or NHK broadcast. I certainly was treating it as such.

If you're going to do something like this, do it right.

By whose definition? Yours? Seems like Mark and Chris feel like they're doing it "right."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, Mark. Time to take a breath and give the chest-thumping a break.

This isn't so much a Sumo Spring as it is a Mark Buckton Spring.

I listened to significant portions of two programs, to a total of about 45 minutes each program. What I heard was mostly chatter about starfish, beer, laundry, beer, tweets, more beer, some emails, beer, and once in a while, some action on the dohyo. In two cases, once each broadcast, a sumo bout was entirely overlooked. The Wakanosato-Aoiyama bout on one day, and I forget the one on the other day. If I was relying on the broadcast for a description of the action in the ring, I would be sorely disappointed. Considering you say you have extensive knowledge and background in this field, I expected a more complete, prepared and informative program. THAT would have been a Sumo Spring, indeed.

If you're going to do something like this, do it right. None of the "low and slow, grab another brew" stuff... And seriously, learn how to do a proper play-by-play. Keep your eye on the dohyo. Use your words to paint a mental picture for the listener. Vary your voice. Did you take the time to hear a tape of your broadcast? If you want to do this properly, spend a few hours listening to your own voice, and experiment with voice infection.

I did 2 years on radio. The first thing they teach you is to be prepared. Not scripted, but prepared, And NEVER more than 2 seconds of silence. Silence is deadly. And be aware of the action. You have an excellent voice for this. Don't treat the show like it's a cozy get-together, unless that's what you want out of it. If so, don't call it a Sumo show if there's less than 80% sumo material.

I don't care if you call it the Mark Buckton Show. Then that's perfectly fine. But don't call it the Sumo Spring, because from what I heard, that title is waaayyyy too misleading.

P.S., Good comments and compliments about the show usually come from other people, the ones who listen to the show. Not usually from the Show's host.

thanks for the points there Lex. Noted.

As I think we have said elsewhere this is a beginning. We will see where it takes us. The main thing is enjoying it at the moment.

With your expertise in broadcasting, I amy get back to you later. As is, the main DJs we are working with all have a couple of decades in the radio biz and are giving us some help as we go but more importantly for now, free reign.

I think I did give you a shout out on Sunday after your comments on Saturday. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first listened to Japanese radio, I was frustrated by the amount of talking. The DJs seem to do more talking than music playing and even when they play music, they talk over it. After a while, I got used to it. I think Mark and Chris's show is a bit like that. Some sumo fans just won't be into it while others will find it a comfortable fit.

I listened to most of it a couple of nights ago while watching the stream. The sumo is part of the show but it's not the whole show. The guys hanging out and enjoying a casual evening with a virtual living room full of people with a common interest in sumo is more what it seems to be about.

I realize some forum members have limited appreciation for Mark's contributions sometimes and Mark seems to have a little fun with that, risking adding more fuel to the fire but I hope the rest of us won't have to endure a flame war over this.

... sorry for being off-topic - this thread was supposed to be about the Estonian paper's interview with Baruto, right?

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first listened to Japanese radio, I was frustrated by the amount of talking. The DJs seem to do more talking than music playing and even when they play music, they talk over it. After a while, I got used to it. I think Mark and Chris's show is a bit like that. Some sumo fans just won't be into it while others will find it a comfortable fit.

I listened to most of it a couple of nights ago while watching the stream. The sumo is part of the show but it's not the whole show. The guys hanging out and enjoying a casual evening with a virtual living room full of people with a common interest in sumo is more what it seems to be about.

I realize some forum members have limited appreciation for Mark's contributions sometimes and Mark seems to have a little fun with that, risking adding more fuel to the fire but I hope the rest of us won't have to endure a flame war over this.

... sorry for being off-topic - this thread was supposed to be about the Estonian paper's interview with Baruto, right?

yep - apparently the paper linked above did try and contact the second Estonian who came over with Baruto all those years ago. They found him but he was rather unhappy about giving an interview.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kitaoji had a strongish start (Jk40w 5-2) but fled Japan after just one basho.

Some considered him as strong a prospect as Baruto but it seems that he was not comfortable with the lifestyle of a low ranked rikishi in Irumagawa-beya.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC there were girlfriend issues too?

I recall Masutoo had the same issues with a girl who mailed me a few times as I was asked by the oyakata to give him a hand for the first couple of weeks. Not sure what happened to her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately the article, http://www.ohtuleht.ee/469776, does not have much to say.

"Sumo needs a new Yokozuna. The only(?!) option is Baruto, but..."

Short summary follows.

Sumo needs a rivalry, which in turn will bring in the audience. Baruto might not be suitable for the role of the yokozuna because of his character. A few words about yokozuna Taiho who was born on the island of Sakhalin and is considered to be the first yokozuna of European origin.

That is about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately the article, http://www.ohtuleht.ee/469776, does not have much to say.

"Sumo needs a new Yokozuna. The only(?!) option is Baruto, but..."

Short summary follows.

Sumo needs a rivalry, which in turn will bring in the audience. Baruto might not be suitable for the role of the yokozuna because of his character. A few words about yokozuna Taiho who was born on the island of Sakhalin and is considered to be the first yokozuna of European origin.

That is about it.

looks like they paraphrased a bit then. But still......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0