Sign in to follow this  
Yubinhaad

Survivors of closed heya

Recommended Posts

Yubinhaad    6,276

Following up on an earlier post in which I mentioned three survivors of a now-defunct heya, I thought I'd round up all the rikishi who qualify for this category. I only include changes which saw rikishi actually move to a different heya - mere name changes aren't included, ruling out the likes of Nakadachi/Sakaigawa or Futagoyama/Takanohana. I'll update this post with any future heya closures, assuming of course that there are survivors who move to another heya. I'll also try to keep it updated with any relevant retirements or shikona changes.

==================

Wakamatsu-beya - Merged into Takasago-beya February 2002. Three survivors:

Asanotosa
Asasekiryu
Asatenmai

Asahikari - Retired after 2006 Hatsu
Asanohama - Retired after 2002 Aki
Asanowaka - Retired after 2005 Natsu
Asasato - Retired after 2002 Kyushu
Asashogo - Retired after 2008 Natsu
Asashoryu - Retired after 2010 Hatsu
Asatakuya - Retired after 2002 Aki
Asatoshi - Retired after 2005 Hatsu
Asayamada - Retired after 2004 Hatsu
Ichinoya - Retired after 2007 Kyushu

==================

Oshiogawa-beya - Closed March 2005. One survivor now in Oguruma-beya:

Hienriki

Ayanokaze - Retired after 2010 Kyushu
Kinunoyama - Retired after 2005 Natsu
Kiozan - Retired after 2009 Kyushu
Wakakirin - Retired after 2009 Hatsu
Wakatoba - Retired after 2007 Aki

==================

Hatachiyama-beya - Closed June 2006. Two survivors now in Yamahibiki-beya:

Amamidake
Hatachijo

Arashitenyu - Retired after 2008 Hatsu
Daitenyu - Retired after 2016 Aki
Danyu - Retired after 2011 Aki
Gotenyu - Retired after 2007 Nagoya
Hakurozan - Retired after 2008 Aki
Hatachidake - Retired after 2010 Kyushu
Sakai - Retired after 2007 Hatsu
Shotenyu - Retired after 2006 Aki
Wakatenyu - Retired after 2006 Aki

==================

Isegahama-beya (previous generation) - Closed February 2007.
Two survivors moved to Kiriyama-beya - Closed January 2011.
Same two survivors moved to Asahiyama-beya - Closed January 2015.
One survivor now in Isegahama-beya (current generation):

Daiisshin

Manazuru - Retired after 2015 Hatsu

NOTE - Other survivors only of the Asahiyama > Isegahama move are listed further down, along with Daiisshin.

==================

Araiso-beya - Closed September 2008.
One survivor moved to Hanakago-beya - Closed May 2012.
Same survivor now in Minezaki-beya:

Arawashi

NOTE - Other survivors only of the Hanakago > Minezaki move are listed further down, along with Arawashi.

==================

Tagonoura-beya (previous generation) - Closed February 2012. Eight survivors split between two heya:

Five survivors now in Dewanoumi-beya:

Aomihama
Aonosho
Hisanotora
Kairyu
Yoshimura

Three survivors now in Kasugano-beya:

Aoiyama
Aokishin
Aozora

==================

Oshima-beya - Closed April 2012. Five survivors now in Tomozuna-beya:

Asahisho
Kyokuhikari
Kyokuhozan
Kyokushuho
Kyokutaisei

Kyokuryuo - Retired after 2014 Hatsu
Kyokutenho - Retired after 2015 Nagoya

==================

Hanakago-beya - Closed May 2012. Four survivors now in Minezaki-beya:

Arawashi
Hikarugenji
Ozora
Wakahizen

Daiho - Retired after 2012 Kyushu
Ugonoumi - Retired after 2015 Hatsu
Wakahikari - Retired after 2014 Haru
Yoyonohana - Retired after 2015 Natsu

==================

Nakamura-beya - Closed December 2012. Three survivors now in Azumazeki-beya:

Byakko
Fujihisashi
Mitozakura

Hishofuji - Retired after 2017 Hatsu
Tokizakura - Retired after 2013 Natsu

==================

Hanaregoma-beya - Closed February 2013. Five survivors now in Shibatayama-beya:

Maeta
Ryuseio
Sakigake
Shoketsu
Wakanoshima

Wakaryusei - Retired after 2017 Hatsu

==================

Magaki-beya - Closed March 2013. Two survivors now in Isegahama-beya:

Shunba
Terunofuji

Wakaaoba - Retired after 2014 Hatsu

==================

Mihogaseki-beya - closed October 2013. Two survivors now in Kasugano-beya:

Kaorufuji
Mienosato

Aran - Retired after 2013 Aki
Kurenishiki - Retired after 2015 Kyushu
Miura - Retired after 2014 Haru
Tochiimari - Retired after 2017 Hatsu

==================

Asahiyama-beya - Closed January 2015. Four survivors now in Isegahama-beya:

Daiisshin
Daitenpaku
Mimurodake
Terunohana

==================

Kasugayama-beya - Closed October 2016. Nine survivors now in Nakagawa-beya:

Haruhikari
Kasugakuni
Kasugamine
Kasuganami
Kasugaryu
Okuniasahi
Okunisato
Tanegashima
Yoshikasuga

Fukunokuni - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Fukuyamato - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Hakunishiki - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Haruzakura - Retired after 2017 Hatsu
Kasugamaru - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Kasugasato - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Kozan - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Kumao - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Mankajo - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Matsubayama - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Mizuguchi - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Ose - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Sasamenishiki - Retired after 2016 Kyushu
Shoei - Retired after 2017 Hatsu

==================

Edited by Yubinhaad
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Orion    411

Great work! Thanks again, for the update. The original appeared just after my own old software disappeared with a zombie Mac.

Now all I need is new software that will duplicate my list of foreign rikishi, originally carefully copied onto computer from the Kyokai's handwritten pages, starting years ago, all nicely color-coded according to country... my desperate salvage attempt (via sending messages with attachments from Kinko's to my office PC) has reduced the list to black and white, and lost the kanji. :-(

Orion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doitsuyama    958

Now all I need is new software that will duplicate my list of foreign rikishi, originally carefully copied onto computer from the Kyokai's handwritten pages, starting years ago, all nicely color-coded according to country... my desperate salvage attempt (via sending messages with attachments from Kinko's to my office PC) has reduced the list to black and white, and lost the kanji. :-(

Orion

Maybe this list is a near duplicate already? Well, if you ever can restore your old list, I'd be grateful for reports of errors or additional rikishi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Orion    411

Now all I need is new software that will duplicate my list of foreign rikishi, originally carefully copied onto computer from the Kyokai's handwritten pages, starting years ago, all nicely color-coded according to country... my desperate salvage attempt (via sending messages with attachments from Kinko's to my office PC) has reduced the list to black and white, and lost the kanji. :-(

Orion

Maybe this list is a near duplicate already? Well, if you ever can restore your old list, I'd be grateful for reports of errors or additional rikishi.

Little resemblance, I'm afraid. My chronological list, like the Kyokai's, goes back to #1 Hiraga of Los Angeles, who entered Kasugano in January 1934.

My last entry in the old software is #166 (not checked for page turns) Torugawa of Mongolia, who entered Minezaki in March 2006. After that it's all in pencil, and not updated since pre-earthquake.

Orion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doitsuyama    958

Little resemblance, I'm afraid. My chronological list, like the Kyokai's, goes back to #1 Hiraga of Los Angeles, who entered Kasugano in January 1934.

My last entry in the old software is #166 (not checked for page turns) Torugawa of Mongolia, who entered Minezaki in March 2006. After that it's all in pencil, and not updated since pre-earthquake.

Orion

Well, the list in the link can of course also be sorted by hatsu dohyo and further details for each rikishi obtained by click on the rikishi. If Torugawa is your #166 you should have seven more rikishi who could be added to the list (on the assumption that both lists have the same definition of "foreigner" - my list tries to go along with the shusshin part of the banzuke). Maybe you can somehow check the early parts of my list as here most likely are most of the additions from your list?

Oh, and I just added the details for Hiraga, so it's six missing rikishi now. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark.Buckton    68

I understand there were 4 Americans, 1 not of Japanese descent, in the 1910s and 20s before Hiraga.

Pre-1934 - when Hiraga first arrived on the banzuke had 'shusshin' (as written on the banzuke) referring to area of training/heya as opposed to area of birth.

Edited by Mark.Buckton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Orion    411

Little resemblance, I'm afraid. My chronological list, like the Kyokai's, goes back to #1 Hiraga of Los Angeles, who entered Kasugano in January 1934.

My last entry in the old software is #166 (not checked for page turns) Torugawa of Mongolia, who entered Minezaki in March 2006. After that it's all in pencil, and not updated since pre-earthquake.

Orion

Well, the list in the link can of course also be sorted by hatsu dohyo and further details for each rikishi obtained by click on the rikishi. If Torugawa is your #166 you should have seven more rikishi who could be added to the list (on the assumption that both lists have the same definition of "foreigner" - my list tries to go along with the shusshin part of the banzuke). Maybe you can somehow check the early parts of my list as here most likely are most of the additions from your list?

Oh, and I just added the details for Hiraga, so it's six missing rikishi now. :-)

Thanks. I'll check when I can. But my list is simply the Kyokai's official list, which I transcribed from handwritten Japanese, putting katakana names into romaji, and adding my own information in English (like " nth foreigner to make sekitori") and other comments. So the rikishi on it are those classified as "foreigner" by the Kyokai in their official records. It's quite possible that their own list is now computerized; when I started transcribing it, (and indeed when I stopped, only a few years ago) the Kyokai had only a looseleaf file, handwritten. Whenever I asked, I got the relevant pages copied. My list is A4 sheets printed sideways, and ends near the bottom of page 4. Colour-coding the name of country of origin was a time-saver idea of my own.

Orion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work! Thanks again, for the update. The original appeared just after my own old software disappeared with a zombie Mac.

Now all I need is new software that will duplicate my list of foreign rikishi, originally carefully copied onto computer from the Kyokai's handwritten pages, starting years ago, all nicely color-coded according to country... my desperate salvage attempt (via sending messages with attachments from Kinko's to my office PC) has reduced the list to black and white, and lost the kanji. :-(

Orion

I may be able to help but I'm a slightly confused about the color-coded list you're trying to retrieve. In what format is it saved?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Orion    411

Great work! Thanks again, for the update. The original appeared just after my own old software disappeared with a zombie Mac.

Now all I need is new software that will duplicate my list of foreign rikishi, originally carefully copied onto computer from the Kyokai's handwritten pages, starting years ago, all nicely color-coded according to country... my desperate salvage attempt (via sending messages with attachments from Kinko's to my office PC) has reduced the list to black and white, and lost the kanji. :-(

Orion

I may be able to help but I'm slightly confused about the color-coded list you're trying to retrieve. In what format is it saved?

I wish I knew. One of my biggest problems is that I go back to the days before computers were coming into general use. I first taught myself (with a Japanese manual) to use a pretty primitive Japanese word processor, put a whole address list onto it, and then had to get it onto my first computer. That was a huge step, in the days when hardly anyone except proto-geeks were using computers.

(wildly OT) One of my regular jobs is with the National Diet Library, which was one of the world's first to try to get its holdings computerized (originally microfilmed!) (vastly complicated by the fact that it needed to use, not English, but the three forms of Japanese writing). Needless to say, by now it has been through several forms of migration and emulation to try and save its original work in this direction, in addition to adding new content in huge quantities (and all free). The just-retired Librarian, Dr. Nagaoka, had been one of Japan's first IT professors, and under his guidance we have moved into a new era. [Return to Sumo Forum] So, while I am working behind the scenes to help publish the work of some of Japan's top IT experts, a lot of my own early work has fallen by the wayside. For the moment, I have simply a printout, in colour, of my input of nearly all the Kyokai's official handwritten list of rikishi they identified as foreigners. Plus a barebones saved version without the fancy touches. My only source was a Xerox copy of the whole document, which I still have. There are some interesting arguments to be made about prior contenders, but that was outside my scope.

How lucky the younger members are, who have only been into computers (and in some cases, sumo) for the last ten years or so.... and these days it's not just the technical side; every time I Iook around the oyakata, it seems half of them have changed their names. This morning when I visited the Kokugikan during the annual Ryogoku Nijiwai Matsuri, at the sumo desk I was greeted as an old friend by three oyakata on duty -- but the most recent, the former Kitazakura, did a double-take and muttered, "But weren't you in charge of the big Japan- British Society group last month?" -- he'd quite forgotten my informal coverage of his beautiful beadwork. And one of the other two nudged him and said confidently "She's been around for ever" (which is true, to a man who started as a 15-year-old) and the other said, "She does NHK English -- and was a supporter of the Master when he was active" -- the latter being my main 'in'.

Orion the diverse

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yubinhaad    6,276

Updated to include the closure of Hanaregoma-beya.

Sadly there were no surviving rikishi from the earlier closure of Nishonoseki-beya.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yubinhaad    6,276

Updated with the closure of Mihogaseki-beya.

Also removed the Tatsutagawa-beya entry from the original post, but I'll quote it here for posterity.

Tatsutagawa-beya - Closed September 2000. No survivors remaining.

Ryuho - Retired after 2012 Natsu.

Yamaryu - Retired after 2012 Aki.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yubinhaad    6,276

Original post updated with the closure of Asahiyama-beya.

Hopefully the way I've written the Isegahama and Araiso entries makes sense. I don't want to overcomplicate things but I also don't want to just remove those earlier closures altogether (until it happens naturally with the retirement of the relevant rikishi).

Also, in the interests of tidying up the list slightly I've removed the shikona change annotations. Shikona changes will still be updated as and when they happen, though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yubinhaad    6,276

Original post updated with the messy closure of Kasugayama-beya. We'll have to wait and see if it's permanent or if it will re-emerge under a new shisho at some point, although frankly I think the remaining rikishi have suffered enough upheaval already.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryafuji    182

Fascinating thread, this. Thanks for the updates. I love the Daiisshin example - started at the old Isegahama beya, now in a different Iseghama beya with two other moves in between.

Edited by ryafuji
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryafuji    182
2 hours ago, McBugger said:

What about Ajigawa-beya? 

It didn't close, it just changed its name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
robnplunder    154

With so many heyas, it's probably normal to see these closures.   Conversely, are there new ones popping up at similar rate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
McBugger    436
50 minutes ago, ryafuji said:

It didn't close, it just changed its name.

I see. Wasn't around then. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryafuji    182
58 minutes ago, robnplunder said:

With so many heyas, it's probably normal to see these closures.   Conversely, are there new ones popping up at similar rate?

The number of new heya openings have slowed considerably since 2006 when the NSK made it harder for oyakata to branch out - you now have to be an ex-yokozuna or ozeki, or have 25 basho in sanyaku or 60 basho in makuuchi. After six openings in the four years from 2002-2006, there were none after the new rules were introduced until ex-Musashimaru's Musashigawa-beya opened in 2013. Since then we've seen ex-Kaio's Asakayama (2014) and ex-Kotonishiki's Asahiyama (2016).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this