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Like a few of you, I have been waiting for this.

Here's the updated Graph.

The reason why I've been waiting is that I made a couple of non-insignificant visual additions directly after publishing the previous version. Thus my hands are all bloody for rubbing them for a full year.

 

So the changelog:

  • Visual helps have been added for determining year and month while scrolling around with large magnification. So no more whining about whichmonthwhatisthisshit.
  • The circles showing absences of former champions now carry more information. First of all, you can now always see how many former champions were absent at a given basho. In case one or more former champion(s), was/were absent because of demotion to lower divisions, this is also indicated now.
  • The left edge of the Graph has been visually updated to present the initial stage of affairs in I-1958 in a more pleasing way.

 

As for trivia that were easily visually available and have relevance for stuff happening in 2021:

  • Thankfully, Hakuho rode West, since his annoying success had been putting the vertical integrity of the Graph in danger for quite a while. In fact, we saw a new record of 62 active banzuke wins in III-21, just before Kakuryu retired.
  • The record for most different yusho winners on the banzuke was tied at 11 in III-21 (previously also XI-20 and VII-00).
  • After Hakuho's retirement the yusho-experience-level dropped to 15 for XI-21, which is the lowest since IX-93 [!], in the aftermath of the 4-Yok retirement phase (Chiyonofuji, Onokuni, Asahifuji & Hokutoumi) between V-91 and VII-92. Back then this event produced the lowest YEL at 6 in VII-92.
  • Terunofuji's consecutive yusho in III-V-21 were the first consecutive yusho since Kakuryu's in III-V-18. (And the same-Yokozuna-consecutive-yusho-drought was only ended with Terunofuji's IX-XI-21 wins.)
  • The previous point translates into 15 basho without consecutve wins. This is the second longest such phase in modern history. The longest one came at 20 basho between XI-74 and I-78, when Kitanoumi and Wajima played pingpong a lot.
  • In terms of participation, 2021 saw only 4 Yokozuna attendances (2x Hakuho, 2x Terunofuji). This is the lowest number since 1994, when Akebono was the sole Yokozuna. The lowest number all-time is in 1992 with 2, which was of course the time of Nokozuna.
  • We had 2 Yokozuna retirements this year, which most previously happened in 2003 with Takanohana II and Musashimaru.
  • Additionally, the two retirements came within four basho (Takanohana II's and Musashimaru's  were in I-03 and XI-03, respectively). You have to go back to 1992 to find the retirements of Asahifuji (I-92) and Hokutoumi (V-92), which were shorter apart and are complemented by 1991's retirements of Chiyonofuji and Onokuni, which came in consecutive basho (V-VII-91).
  • New Yokozuna Terunofuji is the first Grand Champion to have won two yusho at Sekiwake.
  • He is only the third Yokozuna to have won a yusho at Maegashira. The previous guys were Takanohana II and Sadanoyama. The latter had won his first Makuuchi yusho in V-61 at M13w in his THIRD Makuuchi basho (which is in the exceptional category together with Miyabiyama's speedrun to Ozeki).

 

Suggestions and critique: Don't hesitate.

 

If you enjoy this and want to give back, you could help me out with what I posted in another thread.

 

Edited by yorikiried by fate
Onokuni, Okinoumi, whatever... ...they are all fat...
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4 hours ago, yorikiried by fate said:

4-Yok retirement phase (Chiyonofuji, Okinoumi, Asahifuji & Hokutoumi)

O no! One of these things is not like the other.  You even got it right later!

Edited by Gurowake
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5 minutes ago, Gurowake said:

O no! One of these things is not like the other...

Arggh,  no shit, I first typed Chiyonokuni and was proud to have found the typo...

Edited by yorikiried by fate
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Hello world.


The annual update is due. You can find it under this link (which is probably safe, as I use the same file hosting  site to share pirated creatively acquired stuff with my brother-in-law). The link will be valid for two months. If you need it afterwards, just give me a shout.


If you appreciate the thing, feel free to like and comment, so that I know that I am not doing it exclusively for myself.


For the three people who have stumbled into this thread not knowing the Whats and Whys, please download the PDF via the link and read the answers in-document.


After the major revamping last year, I have only added the new data points for 2022 and didn't touch anything design- or featurewise.


Stuff that can be easily derived from Graph-viewing alone (all claims refer to 1958-now):

  • 2022 was only the fourth year with six different yusho winners (1972, 1991, 2020, 2022). Although, 2020 should be discounted, as it had only five tournaments.
  • 2022 was the first year ever to feature three yusho from Maegashira ranks. As a bonus feature they came in a row, which is also new, even if you'd consider consecutive years. And that's actually an ongoing streak...
  • Abi's win was only the second Maegashira win after a playoff situation, the first one being Kyokutenho's in V/12 against Tochiozan.
  • Additionally, Abi is the first Maegashira to yusho after a playoff, if higher ranked rikishi were involved. (The aformentioned Kyokutenho and Tochiozan were both Maegashira; note – though – that the latter was the higher ranked Maegashira of the two [M4e against M7w].)
  • The 3-way-playoff of XI/22 was the first 3+w-PO since III//97 (with 4 challengers). The previous 3w-PO was in III/94. In all those years, this was only the 6th 3w-PO overall, and the 8th 3+w-PO. Such things are really very rare. Which sounds odd, as Day 14 community exitement about the possibility of which seems – from memory – much more frequent.
  • Even if you wouldn't know it anyway, the numbers suggest that we are living in transition times. Never before have there been four basho in a year, where less than 13 wins were enough for the yusho.
  • The three consecutive 12-3s from III to VII are (interestingly enough) not unprecedented. In fact, I-V/72 even saw 11-4, 12-3, 12-3, which is the lowest wins-needed-for yusho average, if counted over half a year (11.67).
  • Based on that, I figured it would be interesting to look at wins-for-yusho-averages for every year since 1958. Naturally, this couldn't be based on just peering at the Graph, as I include win numbers only for a limited set of cases. Therefore, I returned to the source for all info in the piece, i.e. the Doitsubase.
    So, in fact 2022 had the all-time lowest wins-needed-to-yusho average with 12.33. There are only 6 years overall, were the average was below 13:
    1. 2022 12.33 (13, 12, 12, 12, 13, 12)
    2. 1961 12.67 (13, 13, 12, 13, 12, 13)
     . 1975 12.67 (12, 13, 13, 13, 12, 13)
     . 1999 12.67 (13, 13, 13, 13, 12, 12)
    5. 1972 12.83 (11, 12, 12, 13, 15, 14)
     . 2003 12.83 (14, 12, 13, 12, 13, 13)
    The average over all years – btw – is currently 13.61.

 

Finally, some previewish thoughts about January:

  • Since no previous winner retired, we will have a new record of 12 former Makuuchi yusho winners on the banzuke come January. That is, provided everyone fails to do something so outlandishly stupid as to provoke some Stalin-grade purge from the records.
  • This will – interestingly – NOT set a new record low for average wins per former winner (22 yusho distributed among 12 rikishi = 1.83). This record firmly belongs to the era around the Yokozuna-less time in the early 90. In IX/92, 9 yusho were distributed among 7 former winners = 1.29! This is one basho after the record low for "banzuke-yusho-experience-level" (8), which originally the whole Graph was about. Back to the roots.
  • If Terunofuji doesn't have some sudden premature cybertech based comeback in January and/or someone else doesn't get spontaneously promoted to either Yok or Oz for his pretty eyes alone, January will be the first ever basho (in modern times blabla) with an ACTIVE (as in participating) Yokozuna plus Ozeki sum smaller than two. I guess we will see a couple of extra Sekiwake and Komusubi again soon.

 

Have fun and see you around.

 

 

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  • Since no previous winner retired, we will have a new record of 12 former Makuuchi yusho winners on the banzuke come January. That is, provided everyone fails to do something so outlandishly stupid as to provoke some Stalin-grade purge from the records.

There's still the outstanding question of Ichinojo, but that's not likely to be resolved before the banzuke is set.

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4 minutes ago, Sue said:

There's still the outstanding question of Ichinojo, but that's not likely to be resolved before the banzuke is set.

I mean, the banzuke was set yesterday, the Tuesday after the final day, if memory serves and they didn't change that. Therefore, whatever happens, he is on the next banzuke, which is what counts for me. Unless he will be stricken off the thing completely after the fact, which would need some very serious reason. That's what I was aiming at in my comment.

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32 minutes ago, yorikiried by fate said:

I mean, the banzuke was set yesterday, the Tuesday after the final day, if memory serves and they didn't change that. Therefore, whatever happens, he is on the next banzuke, which is what counts for me. Unless he will be stricken off the thing completely after the fact, which would need some very serious reason. That's what I was aiming at in my comment.

Think it's Wednesday (jūryō promotions were only announced today) but otherwise, yes. Seeing as the Ichinojō affair has been brewing for the better part of a year with the NSK aware of it, I don't think it's going to result in action that precipitate as to result in him being off the next banzuke in a hurry.

I mean, he might still retire of his own volition if this comes to a head over the next month, but it's not like they're going to decide to forcibly retire him today or something.

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On 29/11/2022 at 13:13, yorikiried by fate said:

Such things are really very rare. Which sounds odd, as Day 14 community exitement about the possibility of which seems – from memory – much more frequent.

There's quite often, especially recently with lower yusho scores, a very real possibility of a 3+w-PO after Day 14, but it's generally only a hypothetical situation that usually doesn't materialize because the lone leader wins their match and settles it that way.  This time the lone leader was Takayasu...

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11 hours ago, Seiyashi said:

Think it's Wednesday (jūryō promotions were only announced today) but otherwise, yes.

While I'm not sure if it's literally true for YBF since I think he's from somewhere in Europe, but when the decisions are made, it's still Tuesday somewhere in the world.

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3 hours ago, Gurowake said:

While I'm not sure if it's literally true for YBF since I think he's from somewhere in Europe, but when the decisions are made, it's still Tuesday somewhere in the world.

I always see the new juryo announcement on Tuesday evening in my time zone

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