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Kotoviki

Visas, Permanent Residence, and other Japan tales

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The guideline for eijuken is ten years for those not married to a Japanese national, but bureaucrats have leeway in how those guidelines are applied. Less prominent applicants may also apply for, and sometimes get permanent residence earlier than ten years consecutive residence in Japan.

very true!! and each case is different... it is also rude that everyone I know including me applied for Permanent Residence just before the current working visa expired and were told that we must apply for working visa at the same time because "probably" the PR will not come in time and you will not have any visa status.. and in every case I know... I got my working visa, paid the fee, got my passport stamped and 2 days later the PR card came in the mail. My friend told me this is their strategy to make money!

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The guideline for eijuken is ten years for those not married to a Japanese national, but bureaucrats have leeway in how those guidelines are applied. Less prominent applicants may also apply for, and sometimes get permanent residence earlier than ten years consecutive residence in Japan.

very true!! and each case is different... it is also rude that everyone I know including me applied for Permanent Residence just before the current working visa expired and were told that we must apply for working visa at the same time because "probably" the PR will not come in time and you will not have any visa status.. and in every case I know... I got my working visa, paid the fee, got my passport stamped and 2 days later the PR card came in the mail. My friend told me this is their strategy to make money!

So give me the one you do not need any more (Shaking head...)

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The guideline for eijuken is ten years for those not married to a Japanese national, but bureaucrats have leeway in how those guidelines are applied. Less prominent applicants may also apply for, and sometimes get permanent residence earlier than ten years consecutive residence in Japan.

very true!! and each case is different... it is also rude that everyone I know including me applied for Permanent Residence just before the current working visa expired and were told that we must apply for working visa at the same time because "probably" the PR will not come in time and you will not have any visa status.. and in every case I know... I got my working visa, paid the fee, got my passport stamped and 2 days later the PR card came in the mail. My friend told me this is their strategy to make money!

So give me the one you do not need any more ;-)

hehe... sorry even if I could fake it for you... that was back in 2002 for me!! 5 year working visa expired! and it is in the old passport not the new one..

Sorry I would if I could!!! (Shaking head...)

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... it is also rude that everyone I know including me applied for Permanent Residence just before the current working visa expired and were told that we must apply for working visa at the same time because "probably" the PR will not come in time and you will not have any visa status.. and in every case I know... I got my working visa, paid the fee, got my passport stamped and 2 days later the PR card came in the mail. My friend told me this is their strategy to make money!

This seems very strange. In my own experience, and everyone across Japan I've spoken to regarding renewed visas or acquisition of PR gets an "application in process" stamp in their passport. If their current visa expires while the immigration dept. is still working on the new application, one is legally allowed to stay until the process is complete. One may not leave Japan during that period (assuming you wish to get back in), but you are not considered an overstayer. Once the postcard comes confirming your completed application, you go back and get your new visa or PR status. No need to buy an "insurance" visa in the meantime to cover the processing time of the application.

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... it is also rude that everyone I know including me applied for Permanent Residence just before the current working visa expired and were told that we must apply for working visa at the same time because "probably" the PR will not come in time and you will not have any visa status.. and in every case I know... I got my working visa, paid the fee, got my passport stamped and 2 days later the PR card came in the mail. My friend told me this is their strategy to make money!

This seems very strange. In my own experience, and everyone across Japan I've spoken to regarding renewed visas or acquisition of PR gets an "application in process" stamp in their passport. If their current visa expires while the immigration dept. is still working on the new application, one is legally allowed to stay until the process is complete. One may not leave Japan during that period (assuming you wish to get back in), but you are not considered an overstayer. Once the postcard comes confirming your completed application, you go back and get your new visa or PR status. No need to buy an "insurance" visa in the meantime to cover the processing time of the application.

well in my case and at least 3 of my friends they told us that "there is no guarantee that the permanent residence will be granted, therefore you have to apply for working visa renewal."

however every time I applied late for working visa I was in the situation as you mention that it didn't matter the current one expired. I always applied within a few days of my current visa expiring and got a stamp that I had applied for a new visa.

The only special case is the permanent residence. actually what I meant to say above was not that the PR will not come in time but rather that "you may or may not be able to get permanent residence!"

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Ah, that makes sense. It was not a money grab by the government here, it was the applicant waiting until the last minute to apply for PR (days to weeks left on visa), which is not granted to every applicant, regardless of employment status. The case officer was in effect protecting your status, giving you or your friends options should your PR be rejected (and since some are rejected, and the guidelines apply on a case-to-case basis, having a backup plan so close to visa expiration is a very good idea). That immigration office did you and your friends a big favor by giving you timely advice and options for staying should things not go according to plan. You actually could have exploited that favor even more, by waiting just a little longer before going and getting the new working visa, and staying in-country on your "application in process" stamp in the passport. If the PR approval postcard came mere days after the work visa postcard came, you could have simply ignored the work visa card, and paid only for the PR (assuming you were confident it would be approved - you have a full two weeks to go and get the new visa once your postcard arrives), the PR card arriving just days after the visa postcard would give plenty of leeway.

Edited by Otokonoyama

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Ah, that makes sense. It was not a money grab by the government here, it was the applicant waiting until the last minute to apply for PR (days to weeks left on visa), which is not granted to every applicant, regardless of employment status. The case officer was in effect protecting your status, giving you or your friends options should your PR be rejected (and since some are rejected, and the guidelines apply on a case-to-case basis, having a backup plan so close to visa expiration is a very good idea). That immigration office did you and your friends a big favor by giving you timely advice and options for staying should things not go according to plan. You actually could have exploited that favor even more, by waiting just a little longer before going and getting the new working visa, and staying in-country on your "application in process" stamp in the passport. If the PR approval postcard came mere days after the work visa postcard came, you could have simply ignored the work visa card, and paid only for the PR (assuming you were confident it would be approved - you have a full two weeks to go and get the new visa once your postcard arrives), the PR card arriving just days after the visa postcard would give plenty of leeway.

Well, I am not so sure how long or late other people I knew waited to apply but actually I didn't think I could apply yet for permanent residence and they actually told me I could/should do it when I went to pick up an application. The office I was going to was very often empty, an out of the way place that nobody seemed to know about it so I could often walk up to the counter to ask a question or whatnot. I asked if I was eligible to apply and they said I could have already applied after a year into my prior working visa. So I got the paperwork and applied for both.

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The application process is a bit different from visa renewal. Those typically take a matter of a couple weeks or less, while PR processing can take eight weeks to six months in some cases. Typically one applies for PR with at least six months left on their visa in the event their case is one of the more complicated ones. It is no problem to do it the way you did, but you got good advice to apply for the visa renewal at the same time, as your application could be rejected, which would leave you high and dry. It was most definitely not a rip-off, but some rather helpful advice to keep all your options open so as to be able to remain in Japan regardless of the success of the PR application. It's good to hear these stories of how the bureaucracy actually works sometimes.

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As far as I believe his cultural icon status would not be enough for the special 5 year rule.

But the wife is sufficient!

Well, Akebono and Musashimaru got Japanese citizenship somewhere in 1995/96 after coming to Japan in 1988 and 1989, so I guess being ozeki can suffice here.

Naturalization is actually easier for single people considering a permanent stay.

http://www.turning-japanese.info/2010/07/f...-permanent.html

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It was most definitely not a rip-off, but some rather helpful advice to keep all your options open so as to be able to remain in Japan regardless of the success of the PR application. It's good to hear these stories of how the bureaucracy actually works sometimes.

Quick question from the ignorant sidelines: Is this a relatively recent development? From what I recall reading the authorities were a bit notorious for letting applicants walk off the cliff like that, but then it's well possible that those were sources with somewhat of an anti-Japan bias.

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It was most definitely not a rip-off, but some rather helpful advice to keep all your options open so as to be able to remain in Japan regardless of the success of the PR application. It's good to hear these stories of how the bureaucracy actually works sometimes.

Quick question from the ignorant sidelines: Is this a relatively recent development? From what I recall reading the authorities were a bit notorious for letting applicants walk off the cliff like that, but then it's well possible that those were sources with somewhat of an anti-Japan bias.

It's my own experience that most authorities are fairly helpful. There seems to be some leeway in how they can apply the rules when assisting someone, and will do what they can to help when asked. There are horror stories, and no doubt some of them are true. But all in all, I and most I know have had relatively positive experiences. It may be relatively recent, as these days one can look up rules and regs on the Internet before making various applications and requesting assistance, and there are numerous international centres with staff to assist those who need guidance. I'm sure it wasn't as easy to come by information before the wide use of the Internet here.

I recently travelled to China with a large group of Japanese. We booked through a travel agent who secured guides, lodgings, meals, and all other necessities. In the rush to get things prepared, I forgot to get a new re-entry permit to Japan. At the airport prior to departure, the airline counter staff noticed and with a few polite inquiries on my part were able to locate an immigration officer who could issue one on the spot. They could have allowed me to go without saying anything (in which case getting back in to Japan would have been a major PITA), or they could have recommended I stay back as getting necessary documentation was not possible at the literal last moment. Instead, they went out of their way to help. In many cases a calm demeanor and patient attitude will go a long way.

Edited by Otokonoyama

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Yes, the key is being calm and patient with immigrations.

Some examples in the past 20 something years, not even recent..

My friend's visa expired over 3 months but he had not gotten a new job after getting laid off by a going bankrupt computer company. They said "you can collect unemployment" to which he said "then immigrations knows I don't have a job.." duh! anyway until he got a new job he didn't dare go to the office.. and when he did finally go he smiled, apologized and kissed up so well to the girl that she just said "don't let it happen again but this time it is ok, I know you were busy.."

I also have had more than one friend in the situation where they forgot to get a re-entry permit and was given one at the airport with all the apologizing along the way...

on the other hand a super bitch I used to know was working for the same school I was and when her other job let her go she needed our school to sponsor her visa which they did with no problem, they were already sponsoring me at the time.

She was told she couldn't get an instructor visa because the school was private high school and belonged to the Tokyo Electric Power company therefore she could only get a humanities visa. She actually went ballistic on them screaming my name about how I got instructor blah blah and went to our school and screamed at the top of her lungs.. til our boss called them. Sorry they said the rules state "xxxx" and I figured I would get mine taken away since she gave them all my info as well. But come the next renewal I was treated as always and given my instructor visa. :-)

She was also a person who got her food at the drive thru and instead of just checking it before driving away she would say "I have to check it because you Always screw up my orders and I don't know til I got home" no wonder they screwed up her orders. LOL

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My friend's visa expired over 3 months but he had not gotten a new job after getting laid off by a going bankrupt computer company. They said "you can collect unemployment" to which he said "then immigrations knows I don't have a job.." duh!

He probably had nothing to worry about. You'd be surprised at how little the government agencies actually communicate with each other...

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Peterao is correct. Any change in employment status, employer, and such is to be reported to immigration with a couple weeks of the change (similar to address changes being reported to your ward/city office). In practice, however, many visa holders do not, nor do many employers/sponsors report the change themselves (the only times I've heard of the sponsor reporting the change to immigration is when a particularly abusive employer has an employee stand up for their rights, get fired, and then reported). As a general rule, without the visa holder notifying immigration, they would have no knowledge of a change of situation, including unemployment benefits.

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Anyone here know if there will be any problem when applying for eijuuken because I am not in the national insurance system? I have had private health insurance almost since I came to Japan, more than ten years. But I have no disability insurance and really no full replacement for a pension plan (although I have been paying into a smallish offshore retirement plan for a few years now, jointly with my wife...)

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Anyone here know if there will be any problem when applying for eijuuken because I am not in the national insurance system? I have had private health insurance almost since I came to Japan, more than ten years. But I have no disability insurance and really no full replacement for a pension plan (although I have been paying into a smallish offshore retirement plan for a few years now, jointly with my wife...)

If you have private insurance and can prove it you should be ok. They just want to make sure that you have insurance.. at least my understanding. My co-worker is a full time teacher and thus he is able to join the private school's insurance plan with his Japanese family. He was able to get his eijuuken years ago in this situation.

You will probably have to start paying into the national pension system though. As it is supposed to be a requirement even for working visa as I understand it.. However at a certain age they don't make you start paying as you will never be vested enough to get your benefits in time for your retirement. I think that my friend was 50 something or late 50s when they told him that.

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