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omoimori

Hazing vs. Punishment

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This irks me for some reason, so I thought I would finally say something about it.

Hazing is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at initiates to a community. Its purpose is to instill a common experience and to toughen up the newcomer. Everyone suffers when they join and then when they have accumulated seniority, they get to to deal out the misery, so over time anyone who sticks with the community learns both what it is like to be the recipient of brutality and the giver of the suffering. Hazing is intended to strengthen the community through common experience.

Punishment is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at deviants within the community to make it painful for them to continue to deviate. When they get with the program, presumably the unpleasantness ends. Punishment strengthens the community by singling out individuals for unpleasantness that itself deviates from normal procedures in order to deter the undesirable deviant behavior of the perceived transgressor.

The 17-year-old rikishi who was beaten to death was not the victim of hazing that got out of hand. He died from corporal punishment that got out of hand. That distinction is sometimes important.

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This irks me for some reason, so I thought I would finally say something about it.

Hazing is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at initiates to a community. Its purpose is to instill a common experience and to toughen up the newcomer. Everyone suffers when they join and then when they have accumulated seniority, they get to to deal out the misery, so over time anyone who sticks with the community learns both what it is like to be the recipient of brutality and the giver of the suffering. Hazing is intended to strengthen the community through common experience.

Punishment is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at deviants within the community to make it painful for them to continue to deviate. When they get with the program, presumably the unpleasantness ends. Punishment strengthens the community by singling out individuals for unpleasantness that itself deviates from normal procedures in order to deter the undesirable deviant behavior of the perceived transgressor.

The 17-year-old rikishi who was beaten to death was not the victim of hazing that got out of hand. He died from corporal punishment that got out of hand. That distinction is sometimes important.

http://definitions.uslegal.com/h/hazing/

Hazing is defined as an abusive, often humiliating form of initiation into or affiliation with a group, including:

1. Any willful action taken or situation created which recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health of another.

2. Any willful act by any person alone or acting with others in striking, beating, bruising, or maiming; or seriously offering, threatening, or attempting to strike, beat, bruise, or maim, or to do or seriously offer, threaten, or attempt to do physical violence to another made for the purpose of committing any of the acts.

The term hazing does not include customary athletic events or similar contests or competitions, and is limited to those actions taken and situations created in connection with initiation into or affiliation with any organization. The term hazing does not include corporal punishment administered by officials or employees of public organizations when in accordance with policies adopted by their respective organizations.

The beating of Tokitaizan seems to satisfy both conditions. So I guess your case depends on whether or not we would consider a sumo beya a "public organization"

Personally, I still think that the use of "hazing" is appropriate.

Edited by Peterao

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Somewhat strange timing, but heck, why not?

One response I could give would be that a young man was killed, so the difference between hazing and punishment might appear academic to some.

My second response relates to your statement that the distinction might be important. I was wondering in which way it is important to you. I do not know how you intended to construct this distinction, but your statement about "deviants" could be interpreted that to a small degree it might have been Tokitaizan's fault. Following this line of thought, a crime as punishment would not be as strong as a crime as hazing.

In contrast, I would argue about your definition of punishment and replace "deviant" with "perceived deviant". And this makes clear that the perpetrators did not only kill a man, they might have even thought that they have a "right" to do so. In my opinion, that makes a crime much more despicable. So I would argue that crime as punishment is worse than crime as hazing.

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This was an illegal assault causing death; why are we even debating what it should be called?

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This was an illegal assault causing death; why are we even debating what it should be called?

Because he believes that the distinction is "sometimes important". But he hasn't explained why he believes that to be the case for sumo.

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I think the timing for the thread stems from the fact that this is the third anniversary of his death. He joined sumo in May of 2007 (passed medical May 02, mae-zumo Natsu basho), and was killed in the practice ring at the Nagoya camp (Inuyama City, Aichi) of Tokitsukaze-beya in their first practice session there for the upcoming Nagoya basho (June 26).

Edited by Otokonoyama

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This Wakanohana-Interview helped me to built an opinion before I ever went to Japan. Then I went to Japan and the understanding grew up...

To me, Hazing is Punishment, a very deep one which can destroy a human cause it goes on and on and often enough, there is no reason but being different from the mainstream. Totally sux.

Absolutely no tool to educate youngsters.

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This irks me for some reason, so I thought I would finally say something about it.

Hazing is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at initiates to a community. Its purpose is to instill a common experience and to toughen up the newcomer. Everyone suffers when they join and then when they have accumulated seniority, they get to to deal out the misery, so over time anyone who sticks with the community learns both what it is like to be the recipient of brutality and the giver of the suffering. Hazing is intended to strengthen the community through common experience.

Punishment is a form of intentionally unpleasant and frequently violent behavior directed at deviants within the community to make it painful for them to continue to deviate. When they get with the program, presumably the unpleasantness ends. Punishment strengthens the community by singling out individuals for unpleasantness that itself deviates from normal procedures in order to deter the undesirable deviant behavior of the perceived transgressor.

The 17-year-old rikishi who was beaten to death was not the victim of hazing that got out of hand. He died from corporal punishment that got out of hand. That distinction is sometimes important.

While I, like everyone else, has an issue with a teenager being killed, it's important to note that the individuals involved are being punished.

This was a situation that hadn't occurred in the 100's of years of Sumo & the culprits received their due justice. It also serves as a wake up call to others that may have in the past or might in the future partake of such behavior.

I personally take exception that now it's expected wrestlers be treated with kid gloves. The traditionally strict discipline & training regimen wrestlers endure has always been cause for great admiration & respect.

Of course, I make my statement not withstanding the current turmoil in this grandest of sports.

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