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Kintamayama

Asashouryuu-after intai preparations

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The new story spreading now (and with blatant snide undertones and overtones) says that Asashouryuu intends to watch the Haru basho bouts from a masu seat during the second half of the basho. "What if he is seen with a bottle of beer?", queried an article. "Asa watching from a masu seat will surely caused a stir!". warned another. "He has retired, so he's free to do as he pleases", said someone from Takasago beya. "He told me he's going back to Tokyo today (yesterday)", revealed Asasekiryuu."He is leaving for Mongolia this week", added a connected Mongolian. He will not be greeted at the airport by the President, reports a reporter, rather smugly.

Edited by Kintamayama

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Well, it may not be 100% precise. But I am sure he didn't become Yokozuna in just 26 basho, and went on to win 25 yusho without exceptionally hard training. Look at Hakuho. He has everything for great Yokozuna. But he is not taking all the yusho in a year because he tends to do keiko "at his own pace".

Wait, are you implying that Hakuho's yusho (rather, playoff) struggles mean he must have done less training the last couple of years than Asashoryu did at the peak of his performance? If so, that's just nuts. You're rightly pointing out that Shoryu was known as a keiko maniac pre-yokozuna promotion, but the grumblings about his lack of hard practice (and doing things more "for show" and intimidation than anything else) went back at least to 2005.

I don't like arguing with people who think everything they said is absolute truth. What I mean is that Asashoryu WORKED harder than anyone to achieve what he achieved.

I am implying years of continues hard work, from his very early career, maybe even before his career. His high school physical education teacher said that Asashoryu always overdid all the training drills by unreasonable margins.

Wait, and calm down. I know he did not train as hard as before in last few years. Obviously, he got to the point where maintaining a reasonable shape would suffice him to take a few yusho a year. How did he got to this point? Years of hard training I guess. Sheer talent is not enough for this and young Hakuho is a no pushover either.

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"He is leaving for Mongolia this week", added a connected Mongolian. He will not be greeted at the airport by the President, reports a reporter, rather smugly.

Apparently, it will be on the 11th (Thursday) and he is expecting the President to greet him at the airport after all. On another note, Asa's parents left Japan today for Mongolia after finally meeting with him a few days ago. They have been in Japan since February 12th.

Edited by Kintamayama

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Well, it may not be 100% precise. But I am sure he didn't become Yokozuna in just 26 basho, and went on to win 25 yusho without exceptionally hard training. Look at Hakuho. He has everything for great Yokozuna. But he is not taking all the yusho in a year because he tends to do keiko "at his own pace".

Wait, are you implying that Hakuho's yusho (rather, playoff) struggles mean he must have done less training the last couple of years than Asashoryu did at the peak of his performance? If so, that's just nuts. You're rightly pointing out that Shoryu was known as a keiko maniac pre-yokozuna promotion, but the grumblings about his lack of hard practice (and doing things more "for show" and intimidation than anything else) went back at least to 2005.

I don't like arguing with people who think everything they said is absolute truth. What I mean is that Asashoryu WORKED harder than anyone to achieve what he achieved.

I am implying years of continues hard work, from his very early career, maybe even before his career. His high school physical education teacher said that Asashoryu always overdid all the training drills by unreasonable margins.

Wait, and calm down. I know he did not train as hard as before in last few years. Obviously, he got to the point where maintaining a reasonable shape would suffice him to take a few yusho a year. How did he got to this point? Years of hard training I guess. Sheer talent is not enough for this and young Hakuho is a no pushover either.

There's no doubt in anyone's mind that Asashoryu trained like a goal-oriented maniac. To be perfectly honest, if any number of "native" Japanese wannabees had trained as hard, we'd be seeing more "Native" Ozekis and perhaps a couple of "Native" Yokozunas.

Asashoryu didn't have a monopoly on brains. What he did have was a monopoly on was drive, intensity and speed. I honestly don't see that in any one else going into this basho. There are far too many guys in the top third of the banzuke who have cerebral melt-downs too often.

Let's pretend. Take Asa's mental pre-bout focus and transplant it into, say, Baruto. Nobody would be able to stop him. Or Osh. Or Kise. And can you imagine Hakuho?

In later years, Asa coasted in training. Made sense. Knew what he needed to do to win and did it. He didn't do any more keiko for his last yusho than he had to.

I just wish more people would have emulated his early work ethic and drive.

And Wanderer... about the changing places with him... I meant now. Like, tomorrow. No early rising, no bodies to pound, no floors to roll on. Just all the time in the world, money, fame, everything.

Strange, he hasn't called me yet........

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I knew Asa will have a great welcome back home. But I didn't expect it to be a formal reception. I am in total dismay. Here is Asashoryu welcome program:

11:55 AM - Landing at Chinggis Khaan Airport

12:20 PM - Reception by VIPs in VIP hall at the airport.

12:40 PM - Asashoryu Motorcade will head to downtown Ulaanbaatar

1:00 PM - The Motorcade will arrive at Bayangol Hotel

1:10 PM - Asashoryu will meet the press in his press conference

2:00 PM - The press conference will conclude

2:10 PM - Asashoryu will head to the Government Building (Mongolia has just one building for its Parliament, Cabinet and the President)

2:20 PM - State Reception for Asashoryu by government officials, and Aashoryu will pay visit to Changiss Khaan Statue

2:40 PM - Asashoryu and his company will head to State Reception Hall

2:50 PM - Mongolian Prime Minister and his company will meet Asashoryu

3:20 PM - Asahoryu motorcade will head to the First Maternity House

3:40 PM - Asashoryu will present gifts to all mothers who delivered on this day at this Maternity house. Moreover, Asashoryu will give baby blankets to all newborns on that day in Ulaanbaatar.

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I completely agree! At the top of the sumo pyramid, these guys are no longer separately by strength or skill, it is DRIVE, plain and simple. Why is it that the purists claim that the bout is won during the shikiri (sp?) ? Because it is a mental battle at the top level. And mentally, no one was stronger than Asashoryu. Let me add that I was never a big fan, but I have to give him loads of respect, cause he superior to the rest of them.

If you could extract that from Asashoryu and insert in just about any maegashira, he would become an Ozeki, with a very good shot at Yokozuna.

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It's a wonder that anybody in makuuchi still bothers with physical exercise, then.

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It's a wonder that anybody in makuuchi still bothers with physical exercise, then.

John Kruk, the chubby (ok, portly?) outfielder/first baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies in the early '90's was at a sports-related event, where he was introduced as one of that city's prominant sports figures. A lady standing beside him looked him over, and said, "You don't look like an athlete." He replied, "No, ma'am. I'm a baseball player."

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It's a wonder that anybody in makuuchi still bothers with physical exercise, then.

John Kruk, the chubby (ok, portly?) outfielder/first baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies in the early '90's was at a sports-related event, where he was introduced as one of that city's prominant sports figures. A lady standing beside him looked him over, and said, "You don't look like an athlete." He replied, "No, ma'am. I'm a baseball player."

(I am not worthy...)

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It's a wonder that anybody in makuuchi still bothers with physical exercise, then.

John Kruk, the chubby (ok, portly?) outfielder/first baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies in the early '90's was at a sports-related event, where he was introduced as one of that city's prominant sports figures. A lady standing beside him looked him over, and said, "You don't look like an athlete." He replied, "No, ma'am. I'm a baseball player."

(Laughing...)

I'm partial to fat pitchers like David Wells or CC Sabathia who are clearly in terrible shape but still seem to use their fat for momentum in the windup or something haha (I am not worthy...) . I just realized that fat ballplayers is what is missing from Japanese baseball! Maybe that's why I can't get into it...

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can anyone who speaks japanese translate this: http://sportsnavi.yahoo.co.jp/fight/headli...-dal-fight.html

MAP(モンゴル・アサショーリュー・プロレス) MAP: Mongolian Asashouryu Pro Wrestling.

Looks like he's setting up a pro wrestling unit in Mongolia, who knows if he'll actually participate or just be the Mongolian Vince McMahon or Lou Albano.

Edited by Harry

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I've just read Asashoryu press conference transcript. Nothing out of ordinary.

He basically says that Sumo rules are so hard that I had to retire before being expelled. He admitted that he was a problem person in his entire Asashoryu career. But he said he does not regret retiring from sumo, because he gave his all to Ozumo.

When asked by one of the reporters if he could do his danpatsuki ceremony in Mongolia, rather than in Japan he said that he feels dohyo, and sumo to his heart and rather prefer to do the dampatsuki according to Sumo traditions.

When asked about public pressure in Japan, he said he understands feelings of all people in Japan. I still do have many friends, supporters he added.

He said nothing particular is decided for his future plans, no martial arts, no Mongolian wrestling, no politics, and no wedding. He is just focusing to prepare for his retirement ceremony at this stage.

Reporters said he showed up in Mongolian Deel (Mongolian kimono if you will) and looked very relaxed, much different than used to be. His body language indicated that he is in great mood, quite relieved, no tension at all, and appeared just like chatting to his close friend.

He did say though that he did not break anyone's nose at that night, and the force was strong with Kyokai to force his retirement.

About his illustrious career, he stated that he just did not want to be an ordinary sekitori. He said he can't help himself but aim for the best, or something huge, and it is in his nature. He admitted that all his antics came from within, and he couldn't help himself. I was becoming old, but was 100% sure that I will win more than 30 yusho. I had that confidence in me, he said.

He remarked: Though I love Japan and japanese people, I am not ashamed of being a stubborn Mongol either.

He talked warmly about his stable master, saying they understand each other without even talking. Of his compatriots, he expects Harumafuji to do well. Hakuho is already in top position, he added.

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I've just read Asashoryu press conference transcript. Nothing out of ordinary.

Interesting how the Japanese press "colored" the press conference, after being shunned by Asa. The words are the same more or less in both versions, but the tone and emphasis are totally different. The truth is probably somewhere in the middle, but i tend to "believe" the Mongolian version a bit more than the Japanese one.

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can anyone who speaks japanese translate this: http://sportsnavi.yahoo.co.jp/fight/headli...-dal-fight.html

MAP(モンゴル・アサショーリュー・プロレス) MAP: Mongolian Asashouryu Pro Wrestling.

Looks like he's setting up a pro wrestling unit in Mongolia, who knows if he'll actually participate or just be the Mongolian Vince McMahon or Lou Albano.

He said he will definitely not be participating, but will be the producer. The reporter says no way he'll not finally join in at some point.

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Looks like he's setting up a pro wrestling unit in Mongolia, who knows if he'll actually participate or just be the Mongolian Vince McMahon or Lou Albano.

No story here. The truth is that this organization was started by Asashouryuu's manager's brother, who, upon hearing that his brother took full responsibility and volunteered to resign as manager, invited him to join pro-wrestling as his tag team partner. The manager eventually did not resign, so this didn't happen. The brother decided to call the new organization MAP and told everyone interested that it stood for Mongolian Asashouryuu Puroresu. Asa apprently had nothing to do with it, and the brother later denied that the letters stood for that. "It would be cool if he joined us, though..", said the brother.

Lame.

The manager and friends at the announcement party:

spf1003120508000-p1.jpg

Lamer:

spf1003120508000-p2.jpg

Edited by Kintamayama

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FWIW, either the guy with the mask or the tag team he's going to be a part of is called "Mega Mongol(s)" or something like that and he'll be facing the Ichinomiya(s) or whatever to start off. The organization will be having a sort of preview event on March 21st, with the official inaugural event sometime in May where they're still hoping to have Asashoryu show up. BTW, they're apparently trying to build MAP as some sort of hybrid organization that offers both regular puroresu and (some knockoff of) Mongolian wrestling to Japanese audiences, but obviously that part is completely contingent on Asashoryu getting into the project.

Edit: Why is the world map in their logo centered on Europe? (Okay, something vaguely resembling Europe, rather...)

Edited by Asashosakari

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Edit: Why is the world map in their logo centered on Europe? (Okay, something vaguely resembling Europe, rather...)

Ehm...

It's Asia. The blue stuff is water...

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Edit: Why is the world map in their logo centered on Europe? (Okay, something vaguely resembling Europe, rather...)

Ehm...

It's Asia. The blue stuff is water...

Hmm, nice Rorschach test. I'm seeing Asia as the big splotch on the right, Europe in the center, the Atlantic Ocean in the upper-left, and the Indian Ocean south of the Arabian peninsula at the bottom...

Edit: Okay, if I flip it back and forth long enough with a normally coloured world map (seriously, who's putting the land masses in a lighter colour than the bodies of water?) I'm starting to see it, too...the fact that it goes down all the way to the Northern coast of Australia threw me for a loop.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Edit: Why is the world map in their logo centered on Europe? (Okay, something vaguely resembling Europe, rather...)

Ehm...

It's Asia. The blue stuff is water...

Take it a step further- the map is centered on Japan.

As I told my wife when we resided in Tokyo: 1) the world revolves around the Emperor 2) we live just blocks away from the Imperial Palace so 3) the world also revolves around me.

No wonder she often called me the meanest shujin in Chiyoda-ku...

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Actually, it looks like the map is centered on Okinawa. I gotta admit I'm surprised Asashosakari didn't see it sooner. The dark blue mass hardly resembles Europe at all.

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Another perspective, as found surfing another forum:

Alex Bennett, long-time resident of Kansai and the man behind Kendo World, has been interviewed by the Mainichi about the current state of sumo (Japanese).

He makes some interesting points. Firstly, he says that he doesn't consider sumo to be a martial art, although he acknowledges it has a long history, because it is essentially about winning & losing. From that perspective, he is a bit puzzled about all the talk of "dignity" in the sport since he thinks there isn't much emphasis on developing those qualities in sumo training. He also wonders whether past champions were really paragons of virtue or whether the media is simply more prepared to report apparent transgressions.

He then goes on to criticize the decision of the Sumo Council to regard a naturalized wrestler as a foreigner. He argues this is a human rights issue and thinks the fact the press has failed to pick up on that is also problematic. He says that some talk about sumo as a potential Olympic event but such discriminatory actions risk reducing support for the sport overseas.

In conclusion, Bennett writes that "tradition" is an over-used word in sumo. He thinks it is often quite a vague concept and seems to be an excuse to avoid making changes which will keep the sport relevant. Without more transparency and reform, he doesn't see sumo having much of a future.

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