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Sumo Menko Man

Book Review - Sumo by Andy Adams & Clyde Newton

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Sumo Fans,

A few months ago or so we looked at all the books that were written on sumo in English we came up with the following list:

1. The Essential Guide to Sumo by Dorthea Buckingham (1994)

2. Gaijin Yokozuna by Mark Panek (2006)

3. Sumo from Rite to Sport by P.L. Cuyler (1979, revised 1985)

4. The Book of Sumo by Doug Kenrick (1969)

5. Sumo Wrestling by Bill Gutman (1995)

6. Grand Sumo by Lora Sharnoff (1989)

7. The Big Book of Sumo by Mina Hall (1997)

8. The Giants of Sumo by Angela Patmore (1990)

9. Rikishi: The Men of Sumo by Wes Benson (1986)

10. Takamiyama: The World of Sumo by Jesse Kuhaulua (ghostwritten by John Wheeler) (1973)

11. Dynamic Sumo by Clyde Newton (1994)

12. Sumo by Andy Adams and Clyde Newton (1989)

13. Sumo: The Sport and Tradition by J.A. Sargeant (Tuttle, 1959)

14. Sumo Watching by S.W.A. (1993)

15. Sumo: A Pocket Guide by Walter Long (1989)

16. Sumo: A pocket Guide by David Shapiro (Tuttle, 1995)

17. The Joy of Sumo by David Benjamin (1991) - Reviewed September 2009(Thread #1)

18. Sumo by Lyall Watson "A Channel Four Book" (1988)

19. Sumo: A Fan's Guide by Mark Schilling (1994)

20. Grand Sumo Fully Illustrated by PHP Institute Inc

21. Sumo Showdown: The Hawaiian Challenge by Philip Sandoz

22. Jesse: Sumo Superstar by Adams and Schilling

23. Makunouchi Rikishi of the Showa Era by Clyde Newton

24. Sumo - Japanese Wrestling (Tourist Library 34)

25. I am a Rikishi by Reiko Yokono

26. Makunouchi Rikishi of the Showa Era by Clyde Newton

In September 2009 we reviewed "The Joy of Sumo" by David Benjamin.

As you can see from this month's thread topic we'll go to a great book written by Andy Adams and Clyde Newton titled "Sumo".

Title: Sumo

Author: Andy Adams & Clyde Newton

Publisher: W.H. Smith Publishers

Pages: 80

ISBN: 0-8317-7997-7

First Edition 1989

Hardcover

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...............................................................

One of the great parts of this book is I only paid $3.56 including shipping for it on E-bay.

Post all your comments about this book on this thread. Thanks!

Cheers!

Ryan

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I really liked this book, even though it was a fairly quick read. I am sure it was meant for a coffee table, but the pictures are really awesome. I would recommend this to anyone who doesn't know the first thing about sumo as it is really a great overview. Reading this book sparked a couple of questions:

1) Does the sumo school still exist and is it really 6 months long?

2) For a few years in 1989 and 1990 there were 3 Yokozuna and 3 Ozeki and then 4 Yokozuna and 2 Ozeki. This seems somewhat like the situation we have going on now with the 2 Yokozuna and 5 Ozeki. There aren't enough yusho to go around and some regular poor performers. I wonder what the general feeling was toward the rikishi at that time and if there were a lot of outcries for some of them to retire.

3) What is the story behind Andy Adams and Clyde Newton? I know they were well respected in the sumo circles many years ago. Where are they now and what ever happened to Sumo World magazine?

4) Did anyone ever get to watch Chiyonofuji in his prime in person during a tournament?

Thanks!

Ryan

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what ever happened to Sumo World magazine?

Sumo World is still around - sort of! It is printed, with Clyde Newton as Editor. I started reading/memorizing/collecting them in the 70s and have probably 80% of the issues. The quality/accuracy is a shadow of its former self though, but I still buy a copy when I'm at the Kokougikan, which is one of the few remaining places you can still get a copy. You could "subscribe," but if you're like me (and others) that just means having the check cashed/credit card charged and never receiving the first copy. (Sign of disapproval...)

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I really liked this book, even though it was a fairly quick read. I am sure it was meant for a coffee table, but the pictures are really awesome. I would recommend this to anyone who doesn't know the first thing about sumo as it is really a great overview. Reading this book sparked a couple of questions:

1) Does the sumo school still exist and is it really 6 months long?

2) For a few years in 1989 and 1990 there were 3 Yokozuna and 3 Ozeki and then 4 Yokozuna and 2 Ozeki. This seems somewhat like the situation we have going on now with the 2 Yokozuna and 5 Ozeki. There aren't enough yusho to go around and some regular poor performers. I wonder what the general feeling was toward the rikishi at that time and if there were a lot of outcries for some of them to retire.

3) What is the story behind Andy Adams and Clyde Newton? I know they were well respected in the sumo circles many years ago. Where are they now and what ever happened to Sumo World magazine?

4) Did anyone ever get to watch Chiyonofuji in his prime in person during a tournament?

Thanks!

Ryan

I think you'll find most of those answers out there on this forum with a few searches.

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To be honest, I miss 4 of the books above....not that one :)

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I still buy a copy when I'm at the Kokougikan, which is one of the few remaining places you can still get a copy.

Is there another place apart from the Kokugikan?

Actually, I HAD typed in 'only at the KK' but was sure that you would post 'I see it at several newsstands/bookstores.' and changed it. (Sign of disapproval...)

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I really liked this book, even though it was a fairly quick read. I am sure it was meant for a coffee table, but the pictures are really awesome. I would recommend this to anyone who doesn't know the first thing about sumo as it is really a great overview. Reading this book sparked a couple of questions:

1) Does the sumo school still exist and is it really 6 months long?

2) For a few years in 1989 and 1990 there were 3 Yokozuna and 3 Ozeki and then 4 Yokozuna and 2 Ozeki. This seems somewhat like the situation we have going on now with the 2 Yokozuna and 5 Ozeki. There aren't enough yusho to go around and some regular poor performers. I wonder what the general feeling was toward the rikishi at that time and if there were a lot of outcries for some of them to retire.

3) What is the story behind Andy Adams and Clyde Newton? I know they were well respected in the sumo circles many years ago. Where are they now and what ever happened to Sumo World magazine?

4) Did anyone ever get to watch Chiyonofuji in his prime in person during a tournament?

Thanks!

Ryan

1) Aren't gaijin rikishi now required to attend for a full year (2 sessions)?

2) The answer to this may not correlate since the ozeki were mostly seen as holding there own and not in constant kadoban trouble. Even if sometimes you are seeing mostly kyu-roku ozeki they are not also getting too old yet not retiring, setting kadoban records and exciting general speculation about OBSC.

Some of these later became yokozuna and/or regularly challenged for the yusho despite 3 yoks. The kadoban crowd could often beat back kadoban with at least 10 wins, not 8 or 9, and sometimes a yusho. And those that couldn't really hack it EVENTUALLY retired, like our beloved Asashio... Kaio is about 3 basho away from looking just like Asashio at his intai. Plus Onokuni was sitting out several consecutive tournaments or politely allowed to appear a few times in this period so that's one less yokozuna gunning for any given yusho.

[PS there are only 2 years in 1989 and 1990 (Laughing...)]

3) I don't know much about either, but Clyde Newton gives very lucid commentary as a guest host for NHK's English language broadcast. He is usually on once or twice in a given basho (?) and typically co-hosts with Hiro or Ross. Can't remember if I have heard him with Murray...

4) Yes, lots of people and some on this forum I am certain. I also hope we can hear some juicy anecdotes. What exactly is it in the book that makes you want to hear some first-hand accounts?

Edited by kaiguma

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1) Does the sumo school still exist and is it really 6 months long?

It' officially called the Kyoshujo, and it still exists; it's the entire length of the rear of the Kokugikan, sited over the road that runs round the back. That is, it's upstairs; two-thirds is a training area怀with space for three rings (plus showers); the remaining one-third contains the classroom and offices. It runs for two months at a time, between basho; each basho newcomers join so there are always three levels. During a basho it is naturally closed, since the deshi are taking part in the actual sumo, like evcerybody else. So everybody does six months but in two-month bits. The day starts with keiko, then showers, then a different lesson for each day of the week. It happens in the mornings only, Monday-Saturday; after lunch (not chanko-nabe) in the Kokugikan canteen the young deshi then return to their heya.

It's a little different for the university men, who are already up to scratch with keiko, so they stay in their heya and do keiko with their stable-mates; but they have to go to the Kokugikan School for the lesson part.

Foreigners in addition are supposed to be having private Japanese lessons, though last time I heard the 'test' was very simple....

3) What is the story behind Andy Adams and Clyde Newton? I know they were well respected in the sumo circles many years ago. Where are they now and what ever happened to Sumo World magazine?

Andy retired to the USA, handing over the editorship of Sumo World to Clyde who had assumed he would be his successor for years. The rest of the story is complicated and I have neither the time nor the energy to go into details.

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1) Aren't gaijin rikishi now required to attend for a full year (2 sessions)?

I think the change was that you're not "graduated" automatically anymore if you're found to be lacking in some area. They're primarily concerned about lack of language skills, of course, but IIRC that's not the only possible reason a deshi might be sent on an extended tour now, so at least in theory the rule change is also not limited just to foreigners (though in practice it very well may be).

Another thing I read back then - or thought I read - was that as part of the changes, new gyoji and yobidashi are now also attending the lesson parts of the kyoshujo...? Maybe somebody can confirm or debunk that, as I only saw it mentioned at jiji.com and I've never been too sure I got that right at all.

Edited by Asashosakari

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Thanks for the great information!

My interest in Chiyonofuji stems from collecting sumo cards. I've only catalogued two sets of cards that have been dedicated just to certain rikishi/ozeki and those ozeki all went on to become Yokozuna.

In 1961, there was a 20+ cards set that was dedicated just to Ozeki Taiho and Ozeki Kashiwado. Less than a year later they went on to become Yokozuna. In 1981, Amada printed a 20+ card set of Ozeki Chiyonofuji and less than a year later he went on to become a Yokozuna. I am intrigued that people could see the greatness in these rikishi, invest money to print cards of just them and then they go on to be some of the greatest Yokozuna ever(with maybe the exception of Kashiwado).

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