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Zentoryu

Kensho Standings (Nagoya 2009)

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Disclaimer: I translate this information from the Nikkan Sports Webpage. It should not be considered official. Nikkan is known to make mistakes in their kensho counts from time to time, but they usually get around to correcting them. Also, Nikkan only posts the top 10 everyday, so I have no idea how many kensho someone not on that list has.

After Day 1...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 31   1,705,000
Asashoryu	  11	 605,000
Harumafuji	 10	 550,000
Kotomitsuki	 9	 495,000
Takamisakari	6	 330,000
Goeido		  4	 220,000
Kotooshu		3	 165,000
Tokitenku	   3	 165,000
Homasho		 3	 165,000
Chiyotaikai	 2	 110,000
Kokkai		  2	 110,000

Hakuho was the big winner on opening day as his victory over Kotoshogiku netted him 31 kensho envelopes. Asashoryu followed with 11 and Harumafuji with 10.

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After Day 2...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 41   2,255,000   
Asashoryu	  20   1,100,000	
Kotomitsuki	15	 825,000	
Harumafuji	 11	 605,000	
Kotooshu		7	 385,000	
Baruto		  6	 330,000	
Takamisakari	6	 330,000   
Kaio			5	 275,000	
Goeido		  4	 220,000	
Kisenosato	  3	 165,000	
Tokitenku	   3	 165,000	
Homasho		 3	 165,000

Hakuho slapped down Goeido to add ten kensho to his total. Asashoryu picked up nine via tsuridashi against Aran. Kotomitsuki grabbed 6 against Kyokutenho and Kaio five against Kotoshogiku.

Baruto picked up at least five (possibly six) kensho after forcing out Takamisakari. Kotooshu threw down Tochiozan for 4, while Kisenosato pushed out Chiyotaikai for three. Lastly, Harumafuji only took home a single envelope from a yorikiri victory over Iwakiyama.

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After Day 3...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 54   2,970,000   
Asashoryu	  27   1,485,000	
Kotomitsuki	19   1,045,000	
Harumafuji	 11	 605,000	
Kotooshu		9	 495,000	
Kaio			8	 440,000	
Baruto		  6	 330,000	
Miyabiyama	  6	 330,000	
Takamisakari	6	 330,000	
Kisenosato	  5	 275,000	
Kotoshogiku	 5	 275,000

Hakuho threw down Aran to collect 13 more envelopes. Fellow Yokozuna Asashoryu picked up 7 from a yorikiri victory over Goeido.

Harumafuji's road to possible Yokozuna promotion hit a pot hole by the name of Kotoshogiku, who defeated the Ozeki by yorikiri and earned himself 5 kensho in the process.

Miyabiyama picked up his first 6 kensho of the basho, defeating Robocop. Kotomitsuki grabbed 4 envelopes, Kaio 3 and Kotooshu and Kisenosato 2 each.

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Robocop? am I missing something here?

Takamisakari's nickname, due to his strangely stiff movements.

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is that this board's nickname for him or the Japanese fans nickname for him...honestly I never associatied him with Robocop...

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is that this board's nickname for him or the Japanese fans nickname for him...honestly I never associatied him with Robocop...

I can't really remember, but I think the Japanese media started that...

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is that this board's nickname for him or the Japanese fans nickname for him...honestly I never associatied him with Robocop...

I can't really remember, but I think the Japanese media started that...

I've heard been called like that on Eurosport. So either it's a media invention, or Sumoforum is quite influentual...

P.S: Or both..

Edited by Sashohitowa

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is that this board's nickname for him or the Japanese fans nickname for him...honestly I never associatied him with Robocop...

IIRC, Akebono was the creator of Sakari's nickname and after some time the media and the fans used to call him Robocop as well.

Must have been in one of many Takamisakari related articles I've read... but I can't tell you exactly where I got it from.

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After Day 4...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 61   3,355,000	
Asashoryu	  37   2,035,000   
Kotomitsuki	26   1,430,000	
Harumafuji	 14	 770,000	
Kotooshu	   12	 660,000	
Kisenosato	 10	 550,000	
Kaio			8	 440,000	
Chiyotaikai	 8	 440,000	
Baruto		  6	 330,000	
Miyabiyama	  6	 330,000	
Takamisakari	6	 330,000	
Bushuyama	   6	 330,000

For the first time this basho Asashoryu won more kensho than his fellow Yokozuna, picking up 10 after a win against Tochiozan. Hakuho grabbed 7 after throwing down Toyohibiki.

Kotomitsuki is having a great start to his tournament, remaining zensho with an uwatenage victory over Aran that netted him another 7 envelopes. Harumafuji and Kotooshu earned three kensho each from wins over Kyokutenho and Iwakiyama respectively. Chiyotaikai returned to the lead group for the first time since opening day with his second win of the tournament, picking up 6 kensho for himself.

Kisenosato took care of Goeido for 3 envelopes, while Bushuyama got his first win and first kensho of the basho, picking up 6 against the kensho machine known as Takamisakari.

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After Day 5...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 74   4,070,000   
Asashoryu	  41   2,255,000	
Kotomitsuki	30   1,650,000	  
Kotooshu	   18	 990,000	
Harumafuji	 14	 770,000	
Chiyotaikai	12	 660,000	
Kisenosato	 12	 660,000	
Kotoshogiku	 9	 495,000	
Kaio			8	 440,000	
Tamanoshima	 7	 385,000

The two Yokozuna continue along in cruise control, with Hakuho earning himself another 13 kensho and Asashoryu 4 from wins over Kyokutenho and Toyohibiki respectively.

The Sadogatake Ozeki duo of Kotooshu and Kotomitsuki remained tied for the yusho lead with the two yokozuna. Osh took home 6 envelopes and Kotomitsuki 4 after wins over Goeido and Iwakiyama. Another Sadogatake rikishi, Kotoshogiku, also picked up 4 kensho after forcing out Kakuryu.

Chiyotaikai earned 4 with a kotenage victory over Tochiozan. Kisenosato continues to do well in the early going, picking up a win over Kaio that added two more kensho.

Lastly, Tamanoshima makes a rare appearance in the lead group after defeating Takamisakari and taking home probably 5 or 6 envelopes.

Chiyotaikai earned 4 kensho

Edited by Zentoryu

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After Day 6...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		 81   4,455,000	
Asashoryu	  54   2,970,000   
Kotomitsuki	30   1,650,000	
Kotooshu	   22   1,210,000	
Kisenosato	 20   1,100,000	
Harumafuji	 18	 990,000	
Takamisakari   13	 715,000	
Chiyotaikai	12	 660,000	
Kaio			9	 495,000	
Kotoshogiku	 9	 495,000

Asashoryu picked up the most kensho today, taking home 13 after thrusting out Kotoshogiku. Kisenosato knocked off previously undefeated Kotomitsuki to improve to 5-1 and add 8 envelopes to his total. Hakuho grabbed 7 after slapping down winless Tochiozan. Takamisakari also collected 7 envelopes, defeating Toyonoshima for his first win since opening day.

Kotooshu and Harumafuji picked up 4 kensho each from wins over Toyohibiki and Goeido respectively. Lastly, Kaio earned a single kensho by forcing out Aran.

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After Day 7...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		106   5,830,000   
Asashoryu	  63   3,465,000	
Kotomitsuki	45   2,475,000   
Kotooshu	   31   1,705,000	
Kisenosato	 20   1,100,000	
Takamisakari   20   1,100,000	
Harumafuji	 18	 990,000	
Chiyotaikai	15	 825,000	
Kotoshogiku	15	 825,000	
Kaio		   11	 605,000

In terms of kensho, Hakuho was the big winner on Day 7, collecting 25 envelopes from the gyoji after a tsukiotoshi win over Kisenosato. Kotomitsuki was next with 15 from a win over Goeido, followed by Asashoryu and Kotooshu with 9 each from victories over Iwakiyama and Kyokutenho respectively.

Robocop added 7 to his total, while Kotoshogiku picked up 6, Chiyotaikai 3 and Kaio 2. Lastly, if Nikkan is to be believed, Harumafuji didn't receive any kensho today despite a win over Kakuryu.

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Harumafuji didn't receive any kensho today despite a win over Kakuryu.

noticed that after the bout and thought it was kind of strange. I guess the sponsors figured: Two losses? Who're you again?

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Harumafuji didn't receive any kensho today despite a win over Kakuryu.

noticed that after the bout and thought it was kind of strange. I guess the sponsors figured: Two losses? Who're you again?

Strange to say, but ya know, I think there's a grain of truth to your statement. Kensho is, after all, advertising, and the more visible the rikishi, the more he will attract sponsors. That's the thinking in theory, anyway. The fact that no one sponsored a HF/Kak bout perhaps indirectly sends a message. In these days of tight money, anything is/is not possible regarding advertising dollars/yen. Except for Takamisakari (and of course the two Yoks), I suppose the companies are chosing their bouts carefully. The fact that HF's Yok run seems to be off the agenda might mean reduced kensho, but to have none, well, maybe it's a signal? Also, is it a coincidence that the two fighters were both Mongolian? (And for this basho, disappointing ones at that?)

Just a thought... YMMV...

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After Day 8...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		118   6,490,000   
Asashoryu	  63   3,465,000	
Kotomitsuki	61   3,355,000   
Kisenosato	 48   2,640,000   
Kotooshu	   35   1,925,000	
Takamisakari   26   1,430,000	
Harumafuji	 21   1,155,000	
Kaio		   17	 935,000	
Chiyotaikai	15	 825,000	
Kotoshogiku	15	 825,000

Kisenosato knocked Yokozuna Asashoryu from the ranks of the unbeaten and picked up 28 kensho in the process, the second highest single day total of the basho so far.

Kotomitsuki earned 16 after throwing down fellow Ozeki Chiyotaikai and Hakuho picked up 12 from a shitatenage win over Iwakiyama. Kaio collected 6 after forcing out Kyokutenho. Takamisakari also took home 6 from his third straight win. Kotooshu earned 4 and Harumafuji 3.

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The fact that HF's Yok run seems to be off the agenda might mean reduced kensho, but to have none, well, maybe it's a signal? Also, is it a coincidence that the two fighters were both Mongolian? (And for this basho, disappointing ones at that?)

Just a thought... YMMV...

FYI, AFAIK, almost all Kensho are bought and placed before the basho even starts. Sponsors buy kensho, pick which day they want their banners to parade around the dohyo (Day 6 or 7, or all 15 days), which specific bout on that day (last bout or next to last bout), or which specific rikishi (Takamisakari, Asashoryu or YMY).

So the better question to ask would be why Harumafuji attracted so little sponsor attention heading into the tournament in spite of being on a Tsuna run.

Edited by Zentoryu

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After Day 9...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		138   7,590,000   
Kotomitsuki	74   4,070,000   
Asashoryu	  63   3,465,000	
Kisenosato	 50   2,750,000	
Kotooshu	   39   2,145,000	
Takamisakari   34   1,870,000	
Chiyotaikai	25   1,375,000   
Harumafuji	 21   1,155,000	
Kaio		   17	 935,000	
Kotoshogiku	15	 825,000

Hakuho continues to roll along, notching victory number 9 against zero defeats after forcing out Kakuryu. The Yokozuna collected another 20 kensho from the win. Kotomitsuki had the second highest total of the day with 13 after taking care of Harumafuji, effectively ending the latter's Yokozuna promotion hopes, if they weren't gone already.

Chiyotaikai surprised Yokozuna Asashoryu to earn the 10 kensho placed on that bout. Takamisakari picked up 8 envelopes, Kotooshu 4 and Kisenosato 2.

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After Day 10...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		149   8,195,000   
Kotomitsuki	78   4,290,000	
Asashoryu	  77   4,235,000   
Kisenosato	 50   2,750,000	
Kotooshu	   46   2,530,000	
Takamisakari   34   1,870,000	
Chiyotaikai	25   1,375,000	
Harumafuji	 23   1,265,000	
Kotoshogiku	18	 990,000	
Kaio		   17	 935,000

Asashoryu may have fallen behind in the Yusho race, but he was the big winner in terms of kensho on Day 10. The Yokozuna took home 14 after an okuritaosho win over Kakuryu. Hakuho collected 11 from a win over Chiyotaikai to remain zensho and tied with Kotooshu for the Yusho lead. Osh himself was given 7 kensho by the gyoji after he forced out Kisenosato.

Kotomitsuki remained one win behind in the Yusho race with a win over Baruto, adding 4 more kensho to his total in the process. Lastly, Kotoshogiku picked up 3 envelopes and Harumafuji 2.

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After Day 11...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		149   8,195,000	
Kotomitsuki   102   5,610,000   
Asashoryu	  77   4,235,000	
Kisenosato	 50   2,750,000	
Kotooshu	   46   2,530,000	
Takamisakari   34   1,870,000	
Harumafuji	 29   1,595,000	
Chiyotaikai	29   1,595,000	
Kotoshogiku	27   1,485,000	
Kaio		   26   1,430,000

Kotomitsuki stunned Hakuho to knock the Yokozuna from the ranks of the unbeaten and collect the 24 kensho placed on the bout by the sponsors. Mickey also pulled himself into a three-way tie for the Yusho lead after Osh fell to a hatakikomi from Chiyotaikai. Chiyo's win netted him 4 kensho.

Kaio picked up 9 after sending Asashoryu scurrying out of the ring with a kotenage. Kotoshogiku also grabbed 9 from a win over Kisenosato and Harumafuji picked up 6 against Baruto.

Edited by Zentoryu

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After Day 12...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		161   8,855,000   12
Kotomitsuki   102   5,610,000	-
Asashoryu	  96   5,280,000   19
Kotooshu	   50   2,750,000	4
Kisenosato	 50   2,750,000	-
Takamisakari   39   2,145,000	5
Harumafuji	 36   1,980,000	7
Kotoshogiku	31   1,705,000	4
Chiyotaikai	29   1,595,000	-
Kaio		   26   1,430,000	-

Hakuho survived a scare from Kaio, staying tied for the Yusho lead and collecting 12 kensho for himself. Asashoryu knocked Kotomitsuki out of a share of the lead via Yorikiri, picking up 19 envelopes in the process.

Harumafuji picked up 7 against Chiyotaikai and Takamisakari 5 from a slap down victory over Takekaze.

The Sadogatake duo of Kotooshu and Kotoshogiku collected 4 kensho each from wins over Miyabiyama and Iwakiyama respectively, with Osh's win keeping him tied with Hakuho for the overall lead in the Yusho race.

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After Day 13...

Rikishi		 #		 Yen
Hakuho		189  10,395,000   
Asashoryu	 108   5,940,000   
Kotomitsuki   102   5,610,000	
Kisenosato	 53   2,915,000	
Kotooshu	   50   2,750,000	
Takamisakari   39   2,145,000	
Harumafuji	 36   1,980,000	
Kotoshogiku	35   1,925,000	
Chiyotaikai	34   1,870,000	
Kaio		   30   1,650,000

Hakuho took a step closer to the Yusho by defeating Day 12 co-leader Kotooshu in direct competition. The bout saw some 28 kensho banners parade around the dohyo, with the money filled envelopes being handed to the Yokozuna afterward.

Asashoryu pulled off the rare yaguranage kimarite against Harumafuji, improving to 10-3 and collecting another 12 kensho for himself. Chiyotaikai pushed out Goeido for 5 envelopes. Kotoshogiku and Kaio took home 4 envelopes apiece after wins over Kyokutenho and Iwakiyama respectively.

Lastly, Kisenosato defeated fellow Sekiwake Kakuryu to secure his KK and add 3 more kensho to his total.

Edited by Zentoryu

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Just a musing that came to mind while I read the latest kensho totals and the fact that Asa won spectacularly...I wonder if it would make sumo more exciting if there was a small pool of kensho given out for the quality of sumo performed? A company, or even several, could pool together kensho for the most entertaining/spectacular bout of the day in makuuchi and could appoint a panel of their representatives or sports writers or whoever to make the presentation after the day's bouts on TV or in the shitakubeya. It could be akin to player of the day (or similar) and reflect the fact that entertaining matches are good for sumo in that it attracts audience and TV followers. just a thought, and it could be something that rikishi aspire to (like beating Takamisakari) because there is a pay day at the end of it. I guess technically it could also go to a losing rikishi if they had done something spectacular like a throw that did not quite come off, or a throw executed as they stepped out (I'm thinking a ucchari executed where the rikishi has actually already just been pushed out).

Just an early morning musing but I'd be interested in others' thoughts.

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i like the idea, but I'm not sure about the execution. It seems to me that some sort of rut would become evident, with whoever the leader is winning every day just for tradition's sake or somewhat.

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Seems like it would lead to choreographed bouts. Plus, I could see it leading to injury. But maybe if they added it to the exhibition/jungyo tournaments, that maybe fun. Those already have (it seems) more tsuridashis than the actual bashos. I like the one I saw in Kintamaya's video from the Isreal visit where Kotomitsuki did a KAKEZORI I believe.

Edited by Washuyama

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