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sekihiryu

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Now all five ozekis have at least one yusho under their belt... Harumafujis yusho is much less surprising than Kotooshuus, since he is one of the two rikishi who have a balanced record against Hakuho.

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Now all five ozekis have at least one yusho under their belt... Harumafujis yusho is much less surprising than Kotooshuus, since he is one of the two rikishi who have a balanced record against Hakuho.

That really is something. Now that it's happened, it seems that's how it should be..

Funny that guy in your avatar was one I was sure would have a yusho by now when he first skyrocketed to Makuuchi with his hair still down. Not that it's not too late of course.

Edited by Asanomeshi

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Congratulations HarryAma :-P

No longer just an Ozeki with a silly name,,,,,,,,,,,,,now your a Yusho winner with a silly name...... (Neener, neener...)

Edited by Fujisan

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HARUMAFUJIIIIIII!!!

Been a fan for a while and really happy that he got his chance to win. Interesting to know that the technique he used is common in Mongolia. I was wondering what the kimarite would be but it wasn't anything uncommon IIRC.

Although his interview was mainly "ureshii desu", I still wish that they hadn't cut it off in the middle to show the news. "Tonight: More repetitive news about the H1N1 virus that we are all scared to death about..." :-P (Neener, neener...)

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I think Harumafuji is the best rikishi package. Best physique of all rikishi, sharpest one and is indeed very entertaining. Not only because of his speed but his unusual speed and maneuvres. And whoever kills Shoryu like that is always a pleasure. He has been saying the same thing for years now about yorokobaseru the audience and that he does. He may be quite bizarre in his interviews and whatever but on the dohyo he is incredibly well balanced and versatile. It is not often you see a squatting shitate-spin like the one against Hakuho on first bout or the sheer speed. Very good rikishi for oozumo and life.

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Great accomplishment from Harumafuji Byambadorj!

Just as side not: His cousin Ganbaatar was a runner up for last year's Mongolian Sumo championship, and was promoted to Sekiwake. I could not see him in the pictures, he is probably preparing for his yusho campaign as well in this year's Naadam.

Way to go Davaanyam clan!

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Just for gee-whiz, Harumafuji is already heavier than Chiyonofuji was and his career didn't go too bad.

Really? Hmm. He doesn't look it. I guess it was just that physique that made Chiyonofuji look bigger. He was taller maybe? Well, if that's the case, I take it back. Maybe he can be a very consistent yusho contender without any added weight.

Checking my, erm, sources, it says Haruama is one kg lighter than Chiyonofuji. But it could be out of date, and it really doesn't change your argument any.

Harumafuji is about the same height and weight that Chiyonofuji had when fighting.

There was a comment by Kitanofuji that Haruma should not put on too much more weight, as it probably, would slow his sumo, with unintended consequences!

Nice and exiting bashoo!

Patrick aka Chiyonotora

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Just for gee-whiz, Harumafuji is already heavier than Chiyonofuji was and his career didn't go too bad.

Really? Hmm. He doesn't look it. I guess it was just that physique that made Chiyonofuji look bigger. He was taller maybe? Well, if that's the case, I take it back. Maybe he can be a very consistent yusho contender without any added weight.

Checking my, erm, sources, it says Haruama is one kg lighter than Chiyonofuji. But it could be out of date, and it really doesn't change your argument any.

Harumafuji's calves and forearms are less muscled and more delicately boned than Chiyonofuji's.

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Quote from Asanomeshi:

I really think Haruma will have to put on more weight to be a consistent contender, but I guess he has made it further than other lightweight trickmasters such as the eminent Terao, and in short order too.

Actually two of the greatest Yokozunas were about the same size as Harumafuji. Wajima with 14 Yushos to his credit weighed about 125kg throughout his yokozuna career only gaining a little toward the last couple of years finally ending up at 132. Chiyonofuji with 31 Yushos second only to Taiho, was even lighter weighing only 120kg when he was promoted to Yokozuna and then losing 3 kg shortly after. He fought the bulk of his career weighing between 120-125kg again bulking up only slightly toward the last couple years ending up at about 129kg. So while size can be an advantage, if you have the strength and/or the technical prowess a little can indeed go a long way.

Edited by Chisaiyama

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Quote from Asanomeshi:

I really think Haruma will have to put on more weight to be a consistent contender, but I guess he has made it further than other lightweight trickmasters such as the eminent Terao, and in short order too.

Actually two of the greatest Yokozunas were about the same size as Harumafuji. Wajima with 14 Yushos to his credit weighed about 125kg throughout his yokozuna career only gaining a little toward the last couple of years finally ending up at 132. Chiyonofuji with 31 Yushos second only to Taiho, was even lighter weighing only 120kg when he was promoted to Yokozuna and then losing 3 kg shortly after. He fought the bulk of his career weighing between 120-125kg again bulking up only slightly toward the last couple years ending up at about 129kg. So while size can be an advantage, if you have the strength and/or the technical prowess a little can indeed go a long way.

But what was the average weight of the other competitors at Chiyonofuji's and Wajima's times ? Because relative weight and not absolute weight is what counts if you have to move other competitors: if they are the same size as you or lighter ( that was probably Chiyofuji's and Wajima's case ), then strenght is less important and speed and technique are more. In Harumafuji's case there is at least a 20 to 30 kilos gap to overcome ... What do you think ?

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But what was the average weight of the other competitors at Chiyonofuji's and Wajima's times ? Because relative weight and not absolute weight is what counts if you have to move other competitors: if they are the same size as you or lighter ( that was probably Chiyofuji's and Wajima's case ), then strenght is less important and speed and technique are more. In Harumafuji's case there is at least a 20 to 30 kilos gap to overcome ... What do you think ?

No need to make guesses. Just go to Sumo Reference, look at the weights of the joi-jin, make the calculations and report back.

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But what was the average weight of the other competitors at Chiyonofuji's and Wajima's times ? Because relative weight and not absolute weight is what counts if you have to move other competitors: if they are the same size as you or lighter ( that was probably Chiyofuji's and Wajima's case ), then strenght is less important and speed and technique are more. In Harumafuji's case there is at least a 20 to 30 kilos gap to overcome ... What do you think ?

No need to make guesses. Just go to Sumo Reference, look at the weights of the joi-jin, make the calculations and report back.

Assuming, of course, that that information is accurate. Are there any third party verifications of the data's validity?

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Just to take Doitsu up on his comment, I looked at the July 1979 yusho for Wajima, the July 1988 yusho for Chiyonofuji, and this last basho for Harumafuji. whay these? Just randomly picking a yusho for each. I then took their opponents from each bout and got the average weight of the opponent.

Wajima (weighing at 129kg) fought an average weight of 138.47kg

Chiyonofuji (123) vs 159kg average

Harumafuji (126) vs 153.6 average

Impressive numbers for Chiyonofuji I think. The average at this time was a little higher thanks to Konishiki (252kg) and Onokuni (201 kg), the only two of the 45 opponents of yokozuna in my sample to weigh over 200kg.

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Assuming, of course, that that information is accurate. Are there any third party verifications of the data's validity?

Well, those weights are (mostly) yearly updates from the Sumo magazine. Back then Sumo magazine wasn't particularly accurate (or updated frequently enough) with regard to rikishi details, but I believe the makuuchi weights were good enough.

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I will say there were more "good" small rikishi in Wajima's day with Takanohana and Asahikuni heading up the group. I would agree, though, that rikishi are heavier now due to the lack of any smaller rikishi in the joi.

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I hardly write in this forum, altough I enjoy it very much and I have a look to it at least twice a week. However this time at least I had to say that I am very happy that Harumafuji won his first Yusho; I really think he deserves it. To see Ama / Harumafuji in action is really great, regardless if he wins or loses, or even if you like sumo or not, it is simply beautiful. Congratulations Ozeki Harumafuji

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