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Jonosuke

A Case of Theft is Theft

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In the interest of not letting our members from unsuspectingly falling into a pitfall in Japan, this subforum irregularly provides an odd happening or two so you can be aware of possible impending life crisis.

According to the Asahi Newspapers, a 20 year old female University student was arrested on August 19 for charging her mobile phone in Japan Rail's Sagamihara train station

She allegedly charged her phone while waiting for a friend when a passerby noticed her "act" and called Police's Emergency Telephone Line Number 110 (equivalent to 911 in the US).

She was apprehended by the Kanagawa Prefecture Sagamihara District Police promptly and charged with a theft of "0.03 Yen" (for using 0.015 Watt).

However fortunately they subsequently judged it to be a "petty theft" and only issued her a stern warning rather than filing the paperwork and sending it to be processed.

"I understood I did a bad thing," the young woman apologized.

"Whether it's 0.03 Yen or any amount, a theft is a theft," the police said.

Edited by Jonosuke

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This is quite a widespread sort of theft, from what I've seen. I'd never think of carrying the mobile charger with me in the first place, but then, I don't use the phone much.

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when a passerby noticed her "act" and called Police's Emergency Telephone Line Number 110 (equivalent to 911 in the US).

one could argue she "paid" to enter the platform area and should be allowed to use the facilities.

Either way, this passerby seems like real "winner" with nothing better to do, why doesn't this puritan citizen do something 'useful' like harassing litterers, or smokers or bozozoku or something..... sigh.

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What a serious crime- I mean for the petty waste of human endeavour even bothering to arrest her and from the dobber who rang the police .Luckily the cops in Japan don't have guns.

The poor girl will probably lose her job.Then her boss will have to resign for not preventing it.Then other colleagues who have recharged their phones will also lose their jobs even though they deny ever charging their phones.Then there will be a committee to make sure it never happens again.

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(You are going off-topic...) I see the total wasting of police resources can happen in efficient countries like Japan too then. That's re-assuring. Had they actually pursued a conviction then I'd have started thinking that sumo was the only thing I liked about the place. Faith restored.

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a few years ago, there was a spate of arrests for similar - people unplugging vending machines to listen to their stereo / charge their phone and the like.

Personally I think it is not all bad. SOmebody has to pay for that electricity. If you take and don't pay, what other word for it is there?

this is just daft though:

one could argue she "paid" to enter the platform area and should be allowed to use the facilities.

I once heard the argument from the family of a bloke who committed suicide that the station staff were responsible for not 'preventing' it. The repeated warnings to stand back / behind the yellow lines / that a train is approaching - not good enough. What do we need? A nanny state?

Where is the concept of responsibility for our own actions?

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I once heard the argument from the family of a bloke who committed suicide that the station staff were responsible for not 'preventing' it. The repeated warnings to stand back / behind the yellow lines / that a train is approaching - not good enough. What do we need? A nanny state?

Where is the concept of responsibility for our own actions?

Except, I also hear that families of suicide victims are held responsible by the train companies for the delays that the act and the clean up incurs. The other side of the coin, isn't it?

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Urban myth.

that one was discounted several years ago in a series of newspaper articles on the issue - the train companies saying how pissed they were at this rumor that has, according to the papers - never once been 'imposed'

Must have been 7/8 years ago. But in saying that, just a few weeks ago I saw body parts being picked up at Ochanomizu Station. Perhaps someone should pay? Insurance of the deceased? (suicide insurance is paid in Japan if held for more than a certain period before jumping - 2 years?)

Edited by Mark Buckton

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