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Manekineko

Some more pictures

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I am glad that we have this mini-topic of Tachihikari and Tochibayama.

At the time of their joining Ozumo at the 1966 Hatsu basho, there weren't that many college rikishi so they were still rarity. I am sure both joined motivated by ozeki Yutakayama, the first college graduated ozeki from Tokyo Nogyo University (former former Tokitsukaze oyakata and former former Rijicho).

Tachihikari (real name: Odo) of Takasago Beya once placed second at All Japan High School Sumo tournament but did not immediately join thinking he was not big enough (around 180 cm, 100 kg). He went Takushoku University and joined Sumo Club. He won the Eastern Japan college tournament and using a qualifcation rule prevalent at the time, he was able to join at Makushita Tsukedashi 50. He lasted till the 1970 November basho achieving the highest rank of Juryo East 7. He had three Juryo basho.

While Tochibayama (Usui) of Kasugano Beya ended his career similar to Tachihikari, he travelled a different route. He started Sumo while going to Junior High in Gifu Prefecture but as soon as he graduated he more or less "joined" Kasugano Beya living there but going to Meiji Univeristy Nakano High School (the same school Waka/Tochiazuma went later). During his high school years, Usui won the All Japan High School Sumo Tournament two consecutive years. For some reason he decided to go to Meiji Unviersity rather than joining Ozumo when he graduated the high school. But obviously he had another destiny and quit the university in his first year and joined Ozumo.

Since Tochibayama did not have any qualification, he started from Mae-zumo. He made Juryo at the 1970 November basho, nine months later than Tachihikari. Tochibayama at Juryo West 13 had 8-7 record this basho while his camrade Tachihikari finished with 3-12 and left Ozumo after the basho.

Tochibayama lasted three more basho in Juryo, achieving the highest rank of Juryo West 9 and left Ozumo after injuring his right thigh after the 1971 May Basho.

After leaving Ozumo, Tachihikari went on to work in fishing industry while Tochibayama later run a seafood restaurant back in his home of Gifu. Tochibayama passed away on January 11, 1992 at the age of 45 years old. Tachihikari will be 65 years old in one month time.

Edited by Jonosuke

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Tachihikari (real name: Odo) of Takasago Beya once placed second at All Japan High School Sumo tournament but did not immediately join thinking he was not big enough (around 180 cm, 100 kg). He went Takushoku University and joined Sumo Club. He won the Eastern Japan college tournament and using a qualifcation rule prevalent at the time, he was able to join at Makushita Tsukedashi 50. He lasted till the 1970 November basho achieving the highest rank of Juryo East 7. He had three Juryo basho.

http://sumodb.sumogames.com/Rikishi.aspx?s...i=-1&sort=1

The sumo games db reference says OBE Akihiro for Tachihikari's real name. Was it really Odo? I said Obe (actually meant Oube おうべ) for 小戸 due to the database and since that's what some online sources say for 小戸 in general. Of course と (to) for door 戸 is the natural kunyomi so おど 小戸 makes sense there but with Japanese names you never know until you hear it.

Thanks for the stories. Too bad it didn't go so well for Usui.

Edited by Harry

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I really don't know if the name is ever read as Oube or Obe but you never know. Doitsuyama and company are always reliable so they may have the source I don't.

Incidentally the guy who won the All Japan High School Tournament year after Tochibayama (Usui) did in 1965 was Hiromitsu Nagahama and he also went to an university after graduating from a high school in Niigata.

Despite his family being poor and could not support him, Nagahama went to Tokyo Nogyo University and joined their Sumo Club. While working and studying, Nagahama could not spend as much time training in sumo so he nerver really could not win the major tournaments especially against the college phenom of the day, Wajima of Nihon University Sumo Club who won the All Japan College Tournament two straight years.

However with his other accomplishments, Nagahama joined Ozumo at the 1970 Haru Basho while Wajima got in as quickly as possible making his dohyo debut at the 1970 Hatsu, both receiving Makushita Tsukedashi qualification.

Obviously Wajima was a standout becoming yokozuna but Nagahama of Tokitsukaze Beya eventually inherited Yutakayama shikona and made Komusubi. It's rather interesting to know that Yutakayama won four Kinboshi from Wajima in his career. He really went out with gusto every time he faced Wajima.

Nagahama/Yutakayama stayed with the Kyokai after his active days and is now Minato oyakata.

Edited by Jonosuke

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I really don't know if the name is ever read as Oube or Obe but you never know. Doitsuyama and company are always reliable so they may have the source I don't.

Well, I had the wrong reading for Kotonowaka's real name while he was active, so this definitely isn't 100% certain. Real name readings for most sekitori in the database are from other, usually very good sources, but you never know... my guesses at readings are usually marked with a # after the name.

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I really don't know if the name is ever read as Oube or Obe but you never know. Doitsuyama and company are always reliable so they may have the source I don't.

Incidentally the guy who won the All Japan High School Tournament year after Tochibayama (Usui) did in 1965 was Hiromitsu Nagahama and he also went to an university after graduating from a high school in Niigata.

Despite his family being poor and could not support him, Nagahama went to Tokyo Nogyo University and joined their Sumo Club. While working and studying, Nagahama could not spend as much time training in sumo so he nerver really could not win the major tournaments especially against the college phenom of the day, Wajima of Nihon University Sumo Club who won the All Japan College Tournament two straight years.

However with his other accomplishments, Nagahama joined Ozumo at the 1970 Haru Basho while Wajima got in as quickly as possible making his dohyo debut at the 1970 Hatsu, both receiving Makushita Tsukedashi qualification.

Obviously Wajima was a standout becoming yokozuna but Nagahama of Tokitsukaze Beya eventually inherited Yutakayama shikona and made Komusubi. It's rather interesting to know that Yutakayama won four Kinboshi from Wajima in his career. He really went out with gusto every time he faced Wajima.

Nagahama/Yutakayama stayed with the Kyokai after his active days and is now Minato oyakata.

Yutakayama was also known for doing the "standing-splits" shiko (like Katayama does now). That's all I remember about him. Not a very spectacular rikishi.

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Yutakayama was also known for doing the "standing-splits" shiko (like Katayama does now). That's all I remember about him. Not a very spectacular rikishi.

I have basically the same memory of him. A mediocre maegashira who hung out at the bottom edge of the joi-jin. I was surprised to see him listed as an ex-Komusubi, but he did make it three times. He never held it for more than one basho

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I recently came into possession of a book called "100 Years of Sumo History" (相撲百年の歴史). In fact my wife found it in a nearby used book store.

It's a large picture book published in 1970 with 300 pages and probably more than 1,000 pictures. It's a treasure trove of sumo images, so I wanted to share a few with the forum.

Below are just a few of the photos and stories that caught my attention:

Yokozuna Tochinishiki with his two attendants, 1957

2663965008_12160f3fbb_b.jpg

Kitanofuji vs. Tamanoumi, 1970

2663964922_19043f5e2c.jpg

Yokozuna vs. Yokozuna

Tamanoumi died tragically the following year while undergoing an appendectomy.

Today Kitanofuji can still be seen often on NHK providing commentary during honbasho.

1910 British postcard titled "Japanese Wrestlers, Japan - British Exhibition."

2663138735_3226571afe.jpg

The rikishi are wearing short pants under their mawashi.

On the left is Oikari, yokozuna on the Kyoto banzuke before the Osaka and Kyoto associations merged with Tokyo

Edited by Umigame

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It's a treasure trove of sumo images, so I wanted to share a few with the forum.

Thank you!

Yokozuna Tochinishiki with his two attendants, 1957

I believe that they have Golden Lion of Venice film festival on the kesho-mawashi. Kurosawa's Rashomon won the award in 1951...

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I believe that they have Golden Lion of Venice film festival on the kesho-mawashi. Kurosawa's Rashomon won the award in 1951...

Good eye! (Applauding...)

Yes I think you're right. The characters near the bottom of the kesho-mawashi are "Daiei" (大映), separated by a logo in the center. And a quick web search on the Daiei Motion Pictures Company turns up their logo:

200px-DaieiCompany.jpg

Daiei Motion Pictures did indeed produce Rashomon -- and it looks like they were a sponsor of Tochinishiki as well.

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I recently came into possession of a book called "100 Years of Sumo History" (相撲百年の歴史). In fact my wife found it in a nearby used book store.

It's a large picture book published in 1970 with 300 pages and probably more than 1,000 pictures. It's a treasure trove of sumo images, so I wanted to share a few with the forum.

Below are just a few of the photos and stories that caught my attention:

Thank you... very nice pictures (Hit the wall...)

I hope you will try to publish more pictures from this great book (Raging at computer...)

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I hope you will try to publish more pictures from this great book (Sign of disapproval...)

Kaiomitsuki - OK, if you (or any other forum members) have a request for photos of particular rikishi (1970 or earlier), let me know and I will see if they appear in the book.

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I hope you will try to publish more pictures from this great book :-)

Kaiomitsuki - OK, if you (or any other forum members) have a request for photos of particular rikishi (1970 or earlier), let me know and I will see if they appear in the book.

Do you know SumoReference ?

http://sumodb.sumogames.com/

The webmaster of this wonderful Sumo website is Doitsuyama... Maybe you can help him to find pictures of rikishi from the past ;-)

Send him a MP and ask him

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Myobudani

2663138419_7388e17d0a_b.jpg

Myobudani was active in sumo from 1954-69. He served as model for the temple guardian statues at Asakusa Kannon temple. He was very popular with female fans and foreign fans.

474-Nio.jpg

475-Nio.jpg

476-Nio.jpg

477-Nio.jpg

I think the similarity is striking. (I am not worthy...)

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I think the similarity is striking. :-D

Hey great, you got photos of the Asakusa temple guards!

This is the kind of thing that makes a walk around Shitamachi even more enjoyable. I like seeing the connections between sumo and the other pieces of traditional culture.

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I believe the big guy is Dewagatake but since he has short hair so it must have been taken after he retired but he doesn't look like too old for some reason (he retired shortly before he was 40 years old)..

The yokozuna is Taiho.

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Few more pics of ozeki Takanohana I (he would turn 59 two days ago)

takanohanaientranementsip5.png

Suri-ashi

takanohanaishitakubeyapg7.png

In shitaku-beya

asahikunimienoumiettakaqv2.png

Beside Mienoumi and Asahikuni during the fuyu jungyo 1976

takanohanaietkitanoumisqc4.png

Sanyaku soroi-bumi at Nagoya basho 1974 (at the bottom there are Wajima, Takamiyama and Kaiketsu)

takanohanaietkiyokuni05wl3.png

One of my favourite, with Kiyokuni during the natsu basho 1973

takanohanaisigneautograsr7.png

Signing autographes

takanohanaisigneautogranz6.png

Idem

takanohanaiaumicrotw9.png

takanohanaitachimochidejz6.png

Tamanoumi's tachi-mochi during Kyushu basho 1970

takanohanai051977fc4.png

Natsu basho 1977, beside Wakamisugi

More soon...

Edited by Tony

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facetakamiyamakn2.png

Faced Takamiyama

kaiketsuettakanohanaikevp5.png

Faced Kaiketsu during natsu basho 1975's preparation

takanohanaidohyiri.png

Dohyo-iri

dohyiriwb8.png

Id

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kaiketsuettakanohanaikevp5.png

The other sekitori in the picture are Maegeshira Wakanoumi (left) and Sekiwake Arase (directly above Takanohana's head).

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Time for some more pictures:

Who wouldn't want to have their photo taken with these two handsome lads! Aminishiki and Mitoizumi waiting for customers.

TakeaShot.jpg

Hate to nitpick a picture that was posted 6 years ago, by a nice guy, but Minatofuji was always one of my favorites, and Minatofuji is not Mitoizumi. And just in case I thought I was wrong, his name is written behind him for whatever reason. Am really enjoying these pics though!!

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Who is this Yokozuna ?

Based on the clothing style, it may have been in the late 19th century. I vote for Y15 Umegatani Totaro from the late 1880's, but it is just a shot in the dark.

Umegatani_Totaro_I.gif

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