Kintamayama

Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

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58 minutes ago, John Gunning said:

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I don't know where Simon is from but Siddall is a North-to-North-West English name. We gave the world Cumberland Wrestling,  Westmorland Wrestling, Catch-as-catch-can Wrestling and the elusive Lancashire martial art of Ecky Thump . AND most importantly, I once tied for first place in Jason's competition back in 2015.

It's a roses and black pudding thing: you might not understand.

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3 hours ago, John Gunning said:

Article is here

Great article as always, John !

Two comments: 

1) When I read that Doreen Simmons had predated Strange and Watson, I had the image of a raptor hunting down and killing a rabbit.  Hadn't noticed that language quirk before.

2) Centuries from now, when historical details inevitably get muddled, will Hakuho be known as the Pandaazuma of live Sumo?

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4 hours ago, John Gunning said:

I wrote a bit about Hakuho and Hokuseiho

 

John, I've been thinking about whether Sumo will follow the history of American Football.  Linemen used to be big fat guys (w/o diapers) whose job was to get in the way of running backs.  Now linemen are big w/o so much fat and more muscled, but significantly faster.  They have taken over the NFL.  I kind of think of Hakuho this way: tall enough, able to put on weight and still be panther-fast, with a toolbelt full of moves.  Does the new kid seem that way, or is he just big?

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8 hours ago, John Gunning said:

I wrote a bit about Hakuho and Hokuseiho

"It’d be naive to imagine that for a man who has adapted his ring-entering ceremony over the years to honor various historical yokozuna, the idea of “Hakuho Dojo” persisting well into the next century hasn’t occurred to the Mongolian veteran."

That's news to me. Did you mention it in a previous article?

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2 hours ago, Gaijingai said:

That was a good article with some very good points about health concerns. The constant theme throughout the article was that change needs to happen at the heya level. I haven’t followed sumo for very long. I’ve noticed that many of the oyakata seem, outwardly at least, not to be in the best health. So, I’m just pessimistic about any change in attitudes toward health within many of the heya. 

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12 hours ago, Gaijingai said:

Enjoyed the article but was surprised at this:

"That’s mostly a result of an open-door policy, where pretty much any Japanese male under the age of 23 who wants to become a rikishi can do so."

Is this true? I had always assumed that there was some sort of screening process to assess whether recruits have the potential to make it as a rikishi.

 

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1 hour ago, Kaninoyama said:

Enjoyed the article but was surprised at this:

"That’s mostly a result of an open-door policy, where pretty much any Japanese male under the age of 23 who wants to become a rikishi can do so."

Is this true? I had always assumed that there was some sort of screening process to assess whether recruits have the potential to make it as a rikishi.

 

The process seems to be mostly “Are you alive?”

Given Hattorizakura made it in, I assume they must check closely for a pulse to answer this as he shows no visible signs of life.

Edited by Eikokurai
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43 minutes ago, Eikokurai said:

The process seems to be mostly “Are you alive?”

Given Hattorizakura made it in, I assume they must check closely for a pulse to answer this as he shows no visible signs of life.

Jokes aside, although the article mentions that even the hapless rikishi are assets to the heya as what amounts to slave-labor, there are also costs involved in feeding and housing them. At what point does cost outweigh the benefit? 

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1 hour ago, Kaninoyama said:

Jokes aside, although the article mentions that even the hapless rikishi are assets to the heya as what amounts to slave-labor, there are also costs involved in feeding and housing them. At what point does cost outweigh the benefit? 

Several of our posters (including me) have asked what is the per-rikishi allowance the oyakata receives from the NSK.  Still mysterious (though whatever it is, I think it's been reduced by 10% due to these Difficult Times® ).

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7 hours ago, Kaninoyama said:

Jokes aside, although the article mentions that even the hapless rikishi are assets to the heya as what amounts to slave-labor, there are also costs involved in feeding and housing them. At what point does cost outweigh the benefit? 

It’s an interesting economics question. For someone like Hattorizakura who probably doesn’t eat much, there’s probably more value having him around for the housekeeping than not. For someone like Orora, who never earned a salary but consumed the food of four men every day, I can’t imagine what the benefit is. I suppose you can’t kick someone out for eating you out of pocket though.

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7 hours ago, Yamanashi said:

Several of our posters (including me) have asked what is the per-rikishi allowance the oyakata receives from the NSK.  Still mysterious (though whatever it is, I think it's been reduced by 10% due to these Difficult Times® ).

Japan Sumo Association financial support for stables takes various forms.

The JSA pays stablemasters a certain amount per month per rikishi (based on rikishi rank) for upkeep of the stable training room. The board of directors decided how much will be paid out, but refuses to disclose the actual sum.

Support funds for stable maintenance are also paid out (amount undisclosed) based on the number of rikishi trainees.

Support funds are paid to stablemasters each tournament for each rikishi.

Yokozuna ¥300,000

Ozeki ¥200,000

San'yaku ¥100,000

Maegashira ¥50,000

Juryo ¥30,000

The stables also receive ¥60,000 per month for rikishi ranked makushita and below.

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