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Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

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On 23/03/2020 at 10:29, John Gunning said:

I don't but what is wrong with the one they picked?

Let's just say he looks less than happy to get his photo taken.  :-S

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12 hours ago, RabidJohn said:

I knew 'maku(no)uchi' meant 'inside (of) the curtain', but I didn't know where it came from, and I had no idea of the origin of 'juryo'.

Jūryō (十両), is the second highest division, and is fixed at 28 wrestlers. The name literally means "ten ryō"', which was at one time the income a wrestler ranked in this division could expect to receive. The official name of the second division is actually jūmaime (十枚目), meaning "tenth placing" and can be heard in official announcements and seen in some publications, but within and outside the sumo world it is almost universally known as jūryō. 

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_sumo_divisions#Jūryō

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4 hours ago, code_number3 said:

Jūryō (十両), is the second highest division, and is fixed at 28 wrestlers. The name literally means "ten ryō"', which was at one time the income a wrestler ranked in this division could expect to receive. The official name of the second division is actually jūmaime (十枚目), meaning "tenth placing" and can be heard in official announcements and seen in some publications, but within and outside the sumo world it is almost universally known as jūryō. 

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_sumo_divisions#Jūryō

In Discover Sumo―Stories from Yobidashi Hideo Hideo refers to jumaime rather than juryo throughout.

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According to Miki-san, jumaime stems from the time when makushita was the second division, and it was a way of distinguishing the top 10 makushita rikishi on the east and west of the banzuke - like juryo is still the bold part on the mainly makushita second row of the banzuke.

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Free movement of young wrestlers could help sumo build stronger base

Exposure to different stables would help trainees make better career decisions

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Two significant changes in status took place after the Osaka Grand Sumo Tournament.

First up was the promotion of Asanoyama to the sport’s second-highest rank...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/04/01/sumo/free-movement-young-wrestlers-help-sumo-build-stronger-base

 

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[Asanoyama] looks a good bet to become the first ozeki with a second Emperor’s Cup to his name since Tochiazuma managed the feat 17 years ago.

Not quite sure which point John tried to make here. Ozeki Hakuho won his second Yusho 13 years ago and Ozeki Harumafuji less than nine years ago.

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9 minutes ago, Jakusotsu said:

Not quite sure which point John tried to make here. Ozeki Hakuho won his second Yusho 13 years ago and Ozeki Harumafuji less than nine years ago.

Obviously not including anyone that went on to become yokozuna, but yeah, I could have phrased that better.

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Posted (edited)

RE: transfers. This is something I’ve long thought could help sumo. There must be plenty of youngsters who’ve dropped out because they didn’t feel at home in their chosen heya. Since transferring is out of the question their only options are quit or learn to live with it. The simple act of allowing people to move could have a huge effect on issues like bullying and talent retention. If a young rikishi is being mistreated but otherwise wants to pursue sumo, they can find a better home in another heya. This could force the less “progressive” oyakata to change their ways or risk losing their wrestlers to another. It also means guys with potential can find the right place to develop it. Imagine being innately talented at yotsuzumo but finding yourself with an oyakata who teaches only oshi. That talent might go undeveloped.

Edited by Eikokurai
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Sumo's rigid lifestyle offers bubble of protection against coronavirus disruption

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In an interesting twist, rigid traditions and practices that have drawn increasing criticism over the past few years seem to have put sumo in a better position to weather the COVID-19 storm than most other sports...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/04/10/sumo/sumos-rigid-lifestyle-offers-bubble-protection-coronavirus-disruption/

 

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2 hours ago, Otokonoyama said:

Sumo's rigid lifestyle offers bubble of protection against coronavirus disruption

 

In the article there is mention of certain heya running live streams of their keiko. Does anyone have the links for these streams?

(Apologies if these are listed elsewhere in this sub-topic or another)

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4 hours ago, Sasanishiki said:

In the article there is mention of certain heya running live streams of their keiko. Does anyone have the links for these streams?

(Apologies if these are listed elsewhere in this sub-topic or another)

IIRC, it’s Naruto-beya. They streamed on their twitter’s account

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Asanoyama strong favorite to become sumo's next hot star

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...I want to focus on different topics whenever possible. Apart from sumo, American football is one of the few sports that is still “active” in any sense. The NFL is continuing with plans to hold its annual draft of college talent this month, which will be conducted online because of social distancing guidelines.

Sumo, of course, has no draft or free agency — a fact I bemoaned in a recent column. But, as with last year, I’m going to imagine that it does, and put together a mock draft for the sport's top talent.

The only guidelines I’m using are that every rikishi is evaluated based on his current age and experience, and picks should be made with an eye on potential success over the next five years or so...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/04/15/sumo/asanoyama-strong-favorite-become-sumos-next-hot-star

 

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Long layoffs could prove detrimental to amateur and pro rikishi

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In an email sent on April 21, Dariusz Rozum, president of the European Sumo Federation, announced that the 2020 Sumo World Championships, due to be held in Krotoszyn, Poland, in September, have been postponed to 2021.

The news is expected to be confirmed by the International Sumo Federation (IFS) this week, but as yet no official statement has been issued.

A cancellation puts some national governing bodies in a bind...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/04/23/sumo/long-layoffs-prove-detrimental-amateur-pro-rikishi/

 

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