Kintamayama

Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

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1 hour ago, Akinomaki said:
1 hour ago, Jakusotsu said:

Do you really think this belongs to this thread?

Did we ever have an article thread in honbasho? The English title in the URL says all anyway

(a message from the "Scrap that spoiler crap" movement)

1 hour ago, Jakusotsu said:

It's not so much about spoilers but being more of a news flash than a real article.

Even if only a news flash at first, this is the proper Kyodo article, and by now a proper one when you scroll down. Only for the Japanese articles the short news flashes remain and the proper ones follow, English Kyodo posts just one article on the matter.

Your monku thus should rather have been: Do you really think this belongs to this thread yet?

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Ukrainian Sergey Sokolovsky follows sumo great Taiho's career path

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Sergey Sokolovsky recently took the new recruit exam and, when he makes his competitive debut in March, the 22-year-old will become the first-ever Ukrainian in professional sumo.

He won’t be the first rikishi with a connection to the eastern European nation, however...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/16/sumo/ukrainian-sergey-sokolovsky-follows-sumo-great-taihos-career-path/

 

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4 hours ago, Akinomaki said:

Even if only a news flash at first, this is the proper Kyodo article, and by now a proper one when you scroll down. Only for the Japanese articles the short news flashes remain and the proper ones follow, English Kyodo posts just one article on the matter.

Your monku thus should rather have been: Do you really think this belongs to this thread yet?

This thread is supposed to be for articles written by forum members like John Gunning, or otherwise interesting articles by journalists. It's not really meant for routine basho reports.

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1 hour ago, ryafuji said:

This thread is supposed to be for articles written by forum members like John Gunning, or otherwise interesting articles by journalists. It's not really meant for routine basho reports.

Who decides what is interesting? There is no other regular thread on the forum for English articles about sumo, so it has turned into one for all of them. There also were some posts elsewhere that have been criticized for not using this "proper" thread. People all the time contribute things in threads that were not meant for that. Another article link is not actually slowing down the loading time of the page.

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Former yokozuna Kitanoumi was imposing figure in sumo

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Intimidation factor is something that cannot be discounted when it comes to finding reasons for success in sumo.

Some of the greatest yokozuna of all time struck such fear into their opponents that many bouts seemed decided before they even stepped into the ring...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/17/sumo/former-yokozuna-kitanoumi-imposing-figure-sumo/

 

Edited by Otokonoyama
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Reading this article immediately made him more likeable to me. I thought he was just showboating before, but now I see more clearly what he's about. Thanks for posting the link.

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Kokkai helped European rikishi arrive in sumo world

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The first rikishi whose place of origin was listed as somewhere outside Japan was Hiraga, who joined professional sumo in 1934.

Three decades later, Jesse Kuhaulua became the first wrestler of non-Japanese descent in ōzumō (professional sumo).

It took almost another half-century for the first European to make it to sumo’s salaried ranks...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/19/sumo/kokkai-helped-european-rikishi-arrive-sumo-world/

 

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Coverage of Futabayama is very timely, with Tokushoryu threatening to be the new Dewaminato. (Yes, yes, we're barely past nakabi. But still.)

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Kotoshogiku experienced brief but memorable time in spotlight

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There are eight active wrestlers who have spent time at sumo’s second-highest rank.

Two of them, Hakuho and Kakuryu, went on to greater things, getting promoted to yokozuna in 2007 and 2014 respectively.

Another pair, Takakeisho and Goeido, are still ensconced in the ozeki ranks, while the remaining four — Miyabiyama, Tochinoshin, Terunofuji and Kotoshogiku — continue to fight further down the rankings...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/21/sumo/kotoshogiku-experienced-brief-memorable-time-spotlight/

 

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34 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

Another pair, Takakeisho and Goeido, are still ensconced in the ozeki ranks, while the remaining four — Miyabiyama, Tochinoshin, Terunofuji and Kotoshogiku — continue to fight further down the rankings...

Miyabiyama sure looks a lot like Takayasu. B-)

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Nah. Only Takayasu looks like Takayasu. Miyabiyama looks much more like Futagoyama Oyakata.

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Kitazakura known best for talent, attitude outside ring

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Rikishi who are famous for something other than results in the ring usually achieve that status through some notable aspect of their personality.

But whether it’s a comedian-like demeanor or exaggerated gestures before fights, wrestlers normally have just one trait for which they are known.

Not so for Kitazakura...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/22/sumo/kitazakura-known-best-talent-attitude-outside-ring/

 

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6 hours ago, Sue said:

An article in the Washington Post about women's sumo: https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2020/01/22/women-sumo-japan-olympics/

So sad to read another article full of cynicism and lies just to promote feminism. 

For the sport to grow, and for his dojo to flourish, it can’t afford to create barriers. He thinks there’s room in Japan for two versions of the sport: one filled with rituals and theatrics — and only men — and one that is open to both genders and focused on athleticism and competition.

“That way, the tradition can be observed by the professional sumo group," he said. "And in the meantime, sumo as a sport can prosper separately.”

I wonder how it must feel to be a pro rikishi and have someone who trains rikishi think what you are doing doesn't focus on athleticism and competition. Or that you aren't concerned with it's prosperity.

No one involved with any part of this article, outside the female wrestlers, cares in any real way for the sport of sumo or wrestling.

Read this article on wrestling and compare to the Washington Post's about the future of any type of wrestling and what focusing on getting women involved leads to:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kristidosh/2016/03/17/the-future-of-collegiate-wrestling-isnt-at-division-i-level/#53e79d162fcc

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Hanakaze's longevity moves into fifth decade

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In March 1986, while Mike Ditka, Walter Payton and William “The Refrigerator” Perry and the rest of the Chicago Bears were still celebrating their Super Bowl XX mauling of the New England Patriots two-plus months earlier, in Osaka a young man named Daisaku Yamaguchi made his professional sumo debut.

Thirty-four years later, he is still going...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/23/sumo/hanakazes-longevity-moves-fifth-decade/

 

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Tokushoryu perseveres for first Emperor's Cup of career

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Rank-and-filer Tokushoryu overcame all odds at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament and beat ozeki Takakeisho in the final bout on Sunday to win his first top-division championship.

The 33-year-old Nara native delivered the performance of his career at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan to cap off a streak of 13 straight wins and finish with a 14-1 record over 15 days of improbable sumo.

“Deep down I’m feeling like, ‘Is it okay for me to win the championship?’ ” Tokushoryu joked in his post-bout interview...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/26/sumo/basho-reports/tokushoryu-perseveres-first-emperors-cup-career/

 

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Amid tears and laughter, underdog Tokushoryu brings down house after winning maiden title

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After a victory no one would have dared predict, Tokushoryu also proved to be a champion in the afterglow on Sunday.

After spending 12 of sumo’s previous 13 grand tournaments in the second-tier juryo division, the rotund 33-year-old energized the sumo world by winning his first title with a 14-1 record. After completing his victory with a win over ozeki Takakeisho, the 181-cm, 188-kg wrestler broke down in tears of joy.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2020/01/26/sumo/amid-tears-laughter-underdog-tokushoryu-brings-house-winning-maiden-title/#.Xi2gVGgzbDc

 

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