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Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

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11 hours ago, Kishinoyama said:

No link?

It's a request for John Gunning to write an article on Kotooshu.

 

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1 hour ago, ryafuji said:

It's a request for John Gunning to write an article on Kotooshu.

 

(Helpme...)I should have realized that......

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On 22/11/2019 at 08:18, John Gunning said:

That would be the one.

For the record I like the music. I just don't think it fits the visuals particularly well.

Rikishi Files has replaced Sumo 101 and I'll be doing them during the next few basho so if there are guys you are interesting and worth doing 300 words on, by all means let me know.

Can be literally anyone that has ever been on the banzuke.

The Kotonowakas

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More content needed to satisfy sumo's overseas fans

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Sumo’s popularity abroad has increased massively over the past few years.

A huge section of the fan base is now composed of people who have come to the sport relatively recently.

That larger audience has been a boon for those of us working in sports media, driving up demand for expanded coverage and creating opportunities to do deeper and more interesting work...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/11/27/sumo/content-needed-satisfy-sumos-overseas-fans/

 

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On 22/11/2019 at 09:18, John Gunning said:

That would be the one.

For the record I like the music. I just don't think it fits the visuals particularly well.

Rikishi Files has replaced Sumo 101 and I'll be doing them during the next few basho so if there are guys you are interesting and worth doing 300 words on, by all means let me know.

Can be literally anyone that has ever been on the banzuke.

Takatoriki. Hiramaku yusho from M14, 14 sansho, 9 kinboshi, kicked out of sumo as an elder, son-in-law of Taiho, father of Naya (and the others whose names I forget).

Ah ... maybe no need for the article now.

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8 minutes ago, Otokonoyama said:

Hey! Go fix your topic.

Where is it? I can’t find where I posted it on my smartphone. 

 

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15 hours ago, Gaijingai said:

Where is it? I can’t find where I posted it on my smartphone. 

Click any one of the six hot-links in the post you quoted to go to your topic. Then scroll to the first post if necessary, and use the edit function to fix the title.

Edited by Otokonoyama

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Hakuho more than deserving of special elder status

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When you think of sumo, what’s the first word that comes to mind?

Certainly, for anyone who has ever set foot inside the ring, “painful” would be right up there.

Traditional, ritualistic, historical — there are any number of adjectives you could use to describe Japan’s national sport.

The one that perhaps best captures its essence though is “vague"...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/12/18/sumo/hakuho-deserving-special-elder-status/

 

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Sumo: Asanoyama, Daieisho bumped up in rankings for New Year's meet

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Summer basho winner Asanoyama will fight as a sekiwake for the first time at next month's New Year Grand Sumo Tournament, the latest rankings released by the Japan Sumo Association on Tuesday showed.

The 25-year-old rising star earned promotion to sumo's third-highest rank after going 11-4 as a new komusubi at last month's Kyushu tournament. While pursuing a second top-division trophy, he kept pace with grand champion Hakuho until late in the meet.

Asanoyama is the third wrestler from Toyama Prefecture to reach sekiwake and first since Kotogaume in 1986.

"I'm aiming to progress higher in the banzuke. I won't feel confident unless I post double-digit wins as sekiwake," Asanoyama told reporters at his Takasago stable in Tokyo.

"I always compete like a challenger. I'm going to fight my own fight," he said...

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20191224/p2g/00m/0sp/024000c

 

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Remembering Rikidōzan: The (Korean) Symbol of Japan’s Postwar Strength

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Sunday, December 15 marked 53 years since the murder of a Japanese postwar icon Rikidōzan. Some may know of him as the Godfather of Japanese puroresu (pro wrestling), but that’s only part of the story. His life rests at the intersection of Northeast Asian culture, history, and identity, offering the outside observer a window into the complexities that lie in the relationship between regional neighbors...

https://www.tokyoreview.net/2019/12/remembering-rikidozan/

 

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JSA needs to look outward for good of sumo

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Whatever hopes fans had for a peaceful end to the year were dashed when Japan Sumo Association officials instructed Takagenji to take part in his regularly scheduled bout on Dec. 11 despite the wrestler being diagnosed with influenza earlier in the day.

Ten years after an influenza A outbreak killed 40 people in Japan, the decision was yet another stunning lack of judgment by JSA executives.

The victims in the 2009 pandemic were mostly aged 60 and over — exactly the same demographic that occupies many of the seats closest to the ring at sumo events...

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/12/25/sumo/jsa-needs-look-outward-good-sumo

 

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