Kintamayama

Sumo articles by journalists who are Forum members/or not

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Gaijingai said:

Where Will The Trump Cup Be Stored? Will It Be Presented again? Answers here:

https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3012043/us-president-donald-trumps-supersized-sumo-trophy-gets

A large part of this story was carried word for word in the Japan Times as well.  (Which came first, the Kyodo chicken or the mighty AP egg?)

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/05/27/sumo/trophy-presented-trump-go-display-sumo-museum/#.XO1WSi2B10I

Edited by Amamaniac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/05/2019 at 11:43, Amamaniac said:

A large part of this story was carried word for word in the Japan Times as well.  (Which came first, the Kyodo chicken or the mighty AP egg?)

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/05/27/sumo/trophy-presented-trump-go-display-sumo-museum/#.XO1WSi2B10I

I've seen the exact same copy from most all the Tokyo papers on the same day during a basho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Kintamayama said:

Excellent summary. Thank you, Mr. Gunning.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

British director throws new light on sumo in Japan

Quote

A documentary featuring a rising female sumo wrestling talent received its Japanese premiere at a film festival in Tokyo last month.

The short film, directed by British filmmaker Matt Kay and titled "Little Miss Sumo," follows the journey of 21-year-old sumo prodigy Hiyori Kon to the 2018 sumo world championships in Taiwan.

Kon has taken part in the sport since childhood and trains with a sumo club at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, where she studies international relations.

The film shows Kon in training over several months, culminating in her taking part in the 2018 world championships' women's event open-weight category...

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2019/06/13fc47cec89f-feature-british-director-throws-new-light-on-sumo-in-japan.html

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Amamaniac said:

Miki-san provides the updated info re kensho prize money (see Kensho Aki 2019 thread):

http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0005770009

"Today, the association keeps nearly half of the prize money to make sure wrestlers can have their taxes duly paid."

What? Everything i read so far about kensho said, that most of the 2nd half is retirement money with a much smaller part for the bean counters and making the banners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Benihana said:

"Today, the association keeps nearly half of the prize money to make sure wrestlers can have their taxes duly paid."

What? Everything i read so far about kensho said, that most of the 2nd half is retirement money with a much smaller part for the bean counters and making the banners.

They started to keep the next only 3/7th part (quite less than nearly half) of it because they had to pay the taxes for Wajima, who had partied it all away already - but they don't use most of it for the taxes.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Amateur tourneys offer window to sport's future stars

by John Gunning

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2019/06/05/sumo/amateur-tourneys-offer-window-sports-future-stars/

 

Based on what was written here, I want to ask some question

Quote

Mitakeumi, like Asanoyama, was a regular on podiums during his collegiate days, but while the former became both university and amateur yokozuna in 2014, Asanoyama never managed to win any of the big tournaments.

That discrepancy allowed Mitakeumi to start his professional career at the rank of makushita 10, as opposed to one division lower at sandanme 100, where Asanoyama began.

At what stage of amateur tournament can a competitor is eligible to enter pro sumo without having maezumo? And what rank can they start based on their result on that tournament?

 

Thank you (Happygoodbyes...)

Edited by code_number3
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LMGTFY

sandanme tsukedashi (三段目付け出し)
A system instituted in 2015 where an amateur wrestler finishing in the top 8 of either the All-Japan Championships, All-Japan Corporate Championships, National Student Championships, or the National Sports Festival Adults tournament is allowed to skip the bottom two divisions and start at the bottom of the sandanme division. 
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Otokonoyama said:

LMGTFY

sandanme tsukedashi (三段目付け出し)
A system instituted in 2015 where an amateur wrestler finishing in the top 8 of either the All-Japan Championships, All-Japan Corporate Championships, National Student Championships, or the National Sports Festival Adults tournament is allowed to skip the bottom two divisions and start at the bottom of the sandanme division. 

Ah thank you so much!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been done before by another writer in another paper, and here is another look.

Nara sumo museum invites visitors to climb into the ring

Quote

KATSURAGI, Nara Prefecture--When a sumo museum here considered going “interactive,” the city official in charge of it at first opposed the idea.

But Hironao Koike, a former amateur sumo wrestler, discovered that many people wanted to climb in the dohyo ring at the Sumokan Kehaya-za and try the traditional sport for themselves.

“As someone with experience, I found it strange,” said Koike, who initially rejected the idea of providing stuffed sumo costumes and loincloths for museum visitors to help them look like sumo wrestlers. “I’m grateful for members of the (town government’s) commerce and tourism division who gave me the idea.”

Over the past few years, there has been an increasing number of foreigners who have enjoyed trying their hand at sumo wrestling dressed in the costumes and loincloths. They now account for nearly 20 percent of the museum’s paid attendance...

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201906080006.html

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

‘There’s a Fantasy League for That?’ Sumo Wrestling and Fishing Drafts Become Reality

Quote

...Athlete size is a key criterion for Ryan Smithman, 29, in the Grand Sumo Breakdown fantasy league. Mr. Smithman, from Des Moines, Iowa, and three friends—the league’s co-creators—analyze sumo matches and discuss their fantasy teams’ fortunes on a podcast.

Picking winners entails keeping a close eye on wrestlers rising and falling through sumo’s highly stratified rankings. One that dominated in a higher rank but was bumped down due to injury is likely to rule the roost in his new, less competitive division, Mr. Smithman says...

https://www.wsj.com/articles/theres-a-fantasy-league-for-that-sumo-wrestling-and-fishing-drafts-become-reality-11559928607

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Otokonoyama said:

‘There’s a Fantasy League for That?’ Sumo Wrestling and Fishing Drafts Become Reality

 

Sadly behind a pay-wall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Benihana said:

Sadly behind a pay-wall.

I don't post anything behind paywalls. Can't read those ones myself either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Otokonoyama said:

I don't post anything behind paywalls. Can't read those ones myself either.

Then maybe you need a free membership or it's geoblocking. Doesn't matter, asks for login to see the full article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Benihana said:

Then maybe you need a free membership or it's geoblocking. Doesn't matter, asks for login to see the full article.

I see. I just get my Google news notifications and click through to the articles. Don't suppose this works:

https://anon.to/LmVyoq

?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Otokonoyama said:

I see. I just get my Google news notifications and click through to the articles. Don't suppose this works:

https://anon.to/LmVyoq

?

Same result. Happens :-)

I suppose it has nothing to do with the games here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I'll quote the entire section to do with sumo:

Quote

Athlete size is a key criterion for Ryan Smithman, 29, in the Grand Sumo Breakdown fantasy league. Mr. Smithman, from Des Moines, Iowa, and three friends—the league’s co-creators—analyze sumo matches and discuss their fantasy teams’ fortunes on a podcast.

Picking winners entails keeping a close eye on wrestlers rising and falling through sumo’s highly stratified rankings. One that dominated in a higher rank but was bumped down due to injury is likely to rule the roost in his new, less competitive division, Mr. Smithman says.

One of his picks, Tochinoshin, endured a recent tournament of grueling matches to reclaim his ranking at the top echelons. The win ensured Mr. Smithman the top spot in his fantasy league. “I literally jumped off the couch and cheered.”

The group has spent nights staying current with matches in Japan, now 14 hours ahead of Des Moines. “Sometimes you’ll be up until 4 a.m.,” he says, “because you don’t want to wait a full day to see if your favorite guy won.”

https://grandsumobreakdown.wordpress.com/category/fantasy-league/

Edited by Otokonoyama
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sumo Wrestling’s Healthy Secrets

Quote

FOR MANY OF US, sumo wrestling is a shoving match between two enormous men in diapers and top buns. They’re considered “athletes,” sure, but their only job is to be fat and to slam into each other. Yes, they’re burlier than an NFL linebacker. But top sumo wrestlers also have the speed off the block of a sprinter, the flexibility of a yogi, and the mental stamina of a Trappist monk. Professional sumo doesn’t have weight classes, meaning a 600-pound wrestler can face off against someone 200 pounds. Still, it’s not enough to be the heaviest guy in the ring.

“Most people don’t understand that sumo wrestlers are very athletic,” says two-time champion Byambajav Ulambayar, who goes by Byamba. He’s originally from Mongolia and is one of the most recognized wrestlers world- wide. “Pro sumo wrestlers are quick, flexible, strong, and quite tough,” he says.

A traditional sport of Japan is finally getting its due this side of the Pacific. USA Sumo, the sport’s biggest booster in the States, has seen an uptick in amateur participation, including among women. Recently, sumo was recognized by the International Olympic Committee—a crucial step in getting it included in future Games. There’s been a concerted effort to spur interest in the cloistered sport. Sumo’s governing body in Japan has occasionally sent its pro wrestlers on international tours, and sumo tournaments in Japan have more English translations than ever before...

https://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/sumo-wrestlings-healthy-secrets/

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/06/2019 at 09:24, Otokonoyama said:

‘There’s a Fantasy League for That?’ Sumo Wrestling and Fishing Drafts Become Reality

 

Wow!! So finally someone decided to come up with a fantasy sumo wrestling game?? This is mindboggling..

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now