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Guest musa_fan

american sumo wrestler

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Guest musa_fan

does anyone more about mike peru or hanakaze as he is known in calfornia sumo association

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There are a couple of web hits on him, but nothing more recent than 2000...I suppose he stopped competing long ago?

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Guest musa_fan

Aperu.jpg

Sumo wrestler Hanakaze crouches - his powerful legs supporting his massive body.

Hanakaze, a k a Mike Peru, strikes his opponent in the chest with an open hand. The final blow causes the foe to step out of the ring and Hanakaze is the victor.

Though only a practice session, Peru, a senior at Amphitheater High School, has gauged his abilities.

Peru said he transformed his life to become a sumo wrestler two years ago. He was named Hanakaze, Japanese for ``flower wind,'' by the Southern California Sumo Wrestling Association because of his physical ability, like that of a powerful wind, and his gentle demeanor, like that of a flower.

Peru, who weighs 402 pounds and stands 5 feet, 11 inches, became interested in sumo two years ago after watching Manny Yarbrough compete in an Ultimate Fighting Championship event. Yarbrough was the 1995 world amateur champion and the first American sumo wrestler to win a world amateur title.

Peru wrote to the Japanese Amateur Sumo Federation and received information on U.S. sumo activities.

He began to train, which included changing his eating habits. His diet went from a typical Mexican meal to specialty dishes like chankonabi - a soup with meat, vegetables and tofu.

Peru's physical training stresses conditioning techniques to promote flexibility and lower body strength.

While in training, Peru received an invitation to participate in the first North American Amateur Sumo Wrestling Championships in Inglewood, Calif. The June 1997 event attracted 40 wrestlers from the United States and Canada.

Peru said he was honored to compete against Yarbrough, who had to forfeit the bout due to a shoulder injury.

As the youngest participant, Peru said he learned valuable wrestling techniques and conditioning exercises from veterans and coaches.

``That was a great experience for me. I had never gotten the chance to do something like that,'' Peru said. ``Just the fact that little kids came up to me to ask for my autograph made me feel good about myself, and I was really proud to have people looking up to me.''

Peru, a native of Tucson, said he has not befriended sumo wrestlers in the state. He said he has pursued his interest by reading books and surfing the Internet.

``I'm so impressed with Mike,'' said Carol Peru, his mother. ``He has done this on his own. He knew what he wanted and he went for it.''

Peru, 18, hopes to represent the United States in the 2008 Olympics. He said he also wants to teach others about the ancient art by starting a program for sumo wrestlers in Tucson.

Sumo wrestling, a traditional sport and the national pastime of Japan, comes from Shinto - the oldest surviving religion of Japan - and is practiced by wrestlers not just as a sport, but as a way of life, said Peru. Sumo has some similarities to boxing, wrestling and martial arts.

The life of a sumo wrestler is religious and peaceful, and a wrestler must ``always act in a dignified and courteous manner,'' Peru said.

Sumo wrestling began more than 2,000 years ago as a religious ceremony to pray for a plentiful harvest, he said.

Recently, two Americans placed prominently in the sumo ranks, including the current Yokuzuna - grand champion - and Hawaii-born Akebono, prompting Japan to ban non-Asian sumo professionals, said Peru.

The ban may kill Peru's prospects for competing in Japan. However, it will not kill his goal to be a great sumo wrestler in the United States.

``Just by getting in the same stable with them gives you respect with all the other fighters,'' Peru said.

found it on :(http://www.azstarnet.com/public/packages/senior98/peru.html)

another article on him :(http://www.sumoshimpo.com/2000/jun_00.html)

matches([no.59]>http://www.amateursumo.com/porizrating/8thwsc/heavy.htm]

and

[no.105]>http://www.amateursumo.com/porizrating/8thwsc/open.htm])

that's all i could also find abt him.besides i also want to train like him and become a sumo.can anyone provide some free online links for sumo training

post-1644-1180480820_thumb.jpg

Edited by musa_fan

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That article looks like the typical sweeping media look at amateur sumo. There is a general blurring of amateur sumo and the obvious assumption on behalf of the athlete, or the desire by the athlete himself, that competition in amateur sumo might lead to ozumo. I don't know about a ban on non-Asians being driven by the success of Akebono and Musashimaru either. Looking at this guy, his tattoos for one would have been an impediment to joining ozumo.

Given the references to people and other events in the article, this is indeed old.

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where do you live? California? If so, in LA or san diego or other? You can try www.usasumo.com or www.oceansidesumo.com

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does anyone more about mike peru or hanakaze as he is known in calfornia sumo association

Hello Musa_fan and others who commented on me.

I am Mike Peru. I was known as Hanakaze when I was in the SoCal Sumo Association. Harry Dudrow was my Oyakata. Its been three years and hopefully you get this message. As you guys have guessed, I no longer compete. Yes I understood that the tattoos i have would've have hindered my getting into Ozumo. Thats why at that time, i was okay with doing amateur Sumo here in the States. If there is anything you want to know about me, you can email me at juztatribethang@msn.com.

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I am Mike Peru. I was known as Hanakaze when I was in the SoCal Sumo Association. Harry Dudrow was my Oyakata. Its been three years and hopefully you get this message. As you guys have guessed, I no longer compete. Yes I understood that the tattoos i have would've have hindered my getting into Ozumo. Thats why at that time, i was okay with doing amateur Sumo here in the States. If there is anything you want to know about me, you can email me at juztatribethang@msn.com.

Hey Mike, it's Victor. It's been a very long time since we've talked. What have you been doing? I sent a message to your MSN address too.

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