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Otokonoyama

Dorji

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The name Dorji in Mongolian means "thunderbolt" (Dorge in Tibetan, Vajra in Sanskrit). Asashoryu's Mongolian name is Dolgorsuren Dagvadorj. I have seen him called "Dorji" here on SF.

Is Dorji (ending in "i") used as his nickname because it's the root/the same as the "dorj" ending in his second name? Or is it used because it sounds similar and the meaning fits? Any Mongolian member/speaker able to explain?

Edited by Otokonoyama

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Mongolians would call it simply Dorj (without "i" ending).

Dorj(i) sounds more like Tibetan.

Since the Mongolians start promoting Tibetan Buddism in XIII - XIV centuries the Tibeten names become more popular and still used widely today.

Earlier times the names were given by priests (Lamas). Today, the names are given with or without Lamas.

Dolgorsuren Dagvadorj is an entirely Tibetan name....and I have no idea of it's meaning.

Many Mongols also have half Tibetan names like Sanj Bold whereas Bold is steel in Mongolian and Sanj is Tibetan (probably Sanjee) and I don't know the meaning of it.

Many Mongols also use names like Bilgee , Tumur and Arslan which are originated probably from the old Turkic times and mean wise, iron and lion in Mongolian.

Very few Mongols took Russian names like Aleksei and Vladimir since 1940-ies.

Well, I think I should stop here....might be too boring and out of topic.

Edited by Coo-cook

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Not boring at all! I had been reading MONGOLIA: The Legacy of Chinggis Khan, and came across the name tidbit. Thanks for the extra info (Eh?)

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I second the "not boring". I would love to hear more about this.

Of topic, but....

It is thought that American Indians are descended from Mongolians, at least in part. Perhaps one or more of the "migrations" across the land bridge consisted of the same ancestors of todays Mongolian people. Perhaps my great grandfather (x100) was a Dorj?

Of course, now the theory is in question, so maybe not. It is also thought that perhaps Japan, and Korea are sources. Maybe even France?

Whatever the source, it is a small world, and we are all more closely interconnected than we often think.

I'd like to hear more about Mongolian names.

Edited by Iwagakki

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Iwagakki

Well, as far as the migration is concerned, ALL native americans (that is, both south and north Americas) once crossed the Bering straight, which was frozen then. All of them are descentants from mongoloide race.. (not exactly Mongols though ;-) )

The migration rate was one kilometer in 100 years as far as I remember but I might be wrong here. But what does this post do in Ozumo discussions anyway?

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But what does this post do in Ozumo discussions anyway?

Well, if it's not clear, Dorj(i) is Ozumo's lone active yokozuna. ;-)

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In Japanese magazines, his nickname is listed as Dorj so I imagine it has something to do with it.

As for Mongolian name stories, it's not boring at all. I'd like to know more about them.

I feel rather ignorant not knowing about Tibetan connection. Thanks for explanation.

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I also would like to hear more abou the mongolian names (and also all kind of traditions and habits connected with them..)

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I can try to interpret Mongolian names only, have no idea meanings of Tibetan names.

Hakuho -

Last: MunkhBat (EternalSolid)

First: DavaaJargal (......Happiness or Joy) The first part of his First Name is Tibetan, the second is Mongolian.

Tokitenku -

Last: AltanGadas (GoldStake)

First: KhuchitBaatar (StrongHero)

The rest of rikishis have Tibetan Last & First names I think.

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Thanks for all the extra info! No problem drifting a little off-topic. Tangents often lead to interesting places...

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Hakuho -

Last: MunkhBat (EternalSolid)

First: DavaaJargal (......Happiness or Joy) The first part of his First Name is Tibetan, the second is Mongolian.

Davaa is Tibetan and means Monday.

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ALL native americans (that is, both south and north Americas) once crossed the Bering straight

To continue off topic...

It isn't a fact. The Bering Land Bridge theory is under some dispute, as is the "Clovis First" theory.

There are tons of things that provide evidence against the conventional thinking on the land bridge. Several sites now found in many areas cast doubt, as they are turning out to be older than possible using land bridge theory. Notable sites in the southeast US, and a site or two in South America are perhaps as old as 40,000 to 50,000 years old, placing them well before the estimated time period of the Bering land bridge.

Some ideas that some Europeans also crossed the atlantic is compelling. Particularly similarities in tools and other technologies that exist between similar periods on both sides of the atlantic.

Scholarly dogma and differing cultural agendas notwithstanding, evidence is beginning to point to alternatives.

I don't think we have arrived at a definitive answer. The most plausible thing for me is that there was more than one way in, and we aren't all descended from the same band of nomadic big game hunters that wandered over in the last ice age. I think the linguistic trees, cultural differences and a variety of genetic markers and distance all suggest that we come from a variety of sources.

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The most plausible thing for me is that there was more than one way in, and we aren't all descended from the same band of nomadic big game hunters that wandered over in the last ice age. I think the linguistic trees, cultural differences and a variety of genetic markers and distance all suggest that we come from a variety of sources.

I wonder what Fujisan has to say about this...

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The most plausible thing for me is that there was more than one way in, and we aren't all descended from the same band of nomadic big game hunters that wandered over in the last ice age. I think the linguistic trees, cultural differences and a variety of genetic markers and distance all suggest that we come from a variety of sources.

I wonder what Fujisan has to say about this...

I don't know about Fujisan, but all of this 'various sources' malarky is just hogwah and boulderdash. Humans crossed the oceans on the backs of dinosaurs, which were dispatched from a place called Eden by Someone Very Special. It's written in a Book somewhere.

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Thanks Otokonoyama for interesting links on Mongolian names.

You saved me.... and also I learned something from these sites.

I believe American Indians originate from various sources....and it's hard to imagine that some Indian tribes(specially eastern tribes) have something common with Asian nomads.

But, in other hand the culture and shamanistic rituals of some Indian tribes seem stunningly similar to some Mongolian northern tribes. Whether it could be a prove of their common ancestry ...I don't know.

A good friend of mine has started a photo blog and there are some nice photographs of Mongolian faces and doings among others.

http://usukh.photoblog.com/user/usukh/2007/03/10/

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