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John Gunning

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With this portrait up, there is no more yokozuna Takanohana portrait left in the Kokugikan anymore.

But this in a way is a passing of the torch.

Yesterday Asashoryu got a taunt during his dohyo-iri ceremony, someone yelling at him, telling him to lose once in a while. If this isn't a sign of greatness as a rikishi, I don't know what it is. Great Taiho used to hear it often.

When Akinoumi stopped yokozuna Futabayama's record breaking consecutive winning streak at 69, he rushed back to his own heya to report back to his shisho, Dewanoumi oyakata.

Akinoumi was overwhelmed by his accomplishment and was all ready to celebrate with his shisho, former great yokozuna Tsunenohana.

Contrary to his expectation, his shisho was not as ecstatic as he was.

Then Dewanoumi oyakata quietly told him something he never forgot all his life and words that motivated him enough to achive a yokozuna himself later in his career.

"Become a rikishi not to be praised when he wins but to cause an uproar when he loses."

Edited by Jonosuke

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"Become a rikishi not to be praised when he wins but to cause an uproar when he loses."

Woah. That's one for my quote collection.

Reminds me of Sun-Tzu's definition of a great general (paraphrased, of course): it's the one you don't notice, because his victories seem effortless and he never gets himself in tight situations out of which a heroic escape is needed.

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"Become a rikishi not to be praised when he wins but to cause an uproar when he loses."

(Applauding...) What a great quote!! (Please!?...)

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