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Rijicho

Featured Rikishi - Kisenosato

38 posts in this topic

Doesn't have to show in the numbers yet as long as he gains power and skill. Already he has better defense than 1 year ago, more momentum and definitely above all maegashira. He is as successful as Kotomitsuki now and that isn't a bad result.

Agreed. And speaking of Miyabiyama . . .

He has a winning record against rikishi below him in banzuke and turns the tide against higher ranked rikishi with his progress. Good example indeed is Miyabiyama . . .

Who can fill Miyabiyama's vacant Sekiwake seat? Maybe Kotoshogiku, but he's not a perennail quite yet in my book. Kisenosato is way more consistent. Unless Miya-baby pours on the gamba-juice in March, he will have a lot of trouble making his way back up. Too much new cometition and his confidence has always been fragile. So Ama and Kotoshogiku might trade out the Sekiwake seat for a few basho (if Ama even manages KK from Komusubi) but by the end of the year, we are more likely to see Kisenosato there to stay, and by then he'll be ready for Ozeki promotion some time in 2008. That's the most sane prediction I've ever made, and who could safely bet against it?

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Who can fill Miyabiyama's vacant Sekiwake seat? Maybe Kotoshogiku, but he's not a perennail quite yet in my book. Kisenosato is way more consistent. Unless Miya-baby pours on the gamba-juice in March, he will have a lot of trouble making his way back up. Too much new cometition and his confidence has always been fragile. So Ama and Kotoshogiku might trade out the Sekiwake seat for a few basho (if Ama even manages KK from Komusubi) but by the end of the year, we are more likely to see Kisenosato there to stay, and by then he'll be ready for Ozeki promotion some time in 2008. That's the most sane prediction I've ever made, and who could safely bet against it?

I could, for the simple reason that many underestimate Miyabiyama and over-estimate Kisenosato. I predict Miyabiyama will return to Ozeki way before Kisenosato becomes a Sekiwake stalwart.

I steak my reputation on it, with a side order of fries and Coke.

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He is as successful as Kotomitsuki now

(Laughing...) Really?

Kotomistuki has won the Emperor's cup and has 11 sansho plus three Kinboshi.

He also won the yusho in Juryo and makushita.

Kisenosato has two sansho and one kinboshi.

The keyword is "now", not "until now". This said, I'd like to state that by my strength ratings Kotomitsuki still is consistently better than Kisenosato but not by much. Could change every basho, but didn't happen yet.

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The keyword is "now", not "until now". This said, I'd like to state that by my strength ratings Kotomitsuki still is consistently better than Kisenosato but not by much. Could change every basho, but didn't happen yet.

Might not be too much longer if Kisenosato keeps improving at the same pace:

[table]

Basho

Kotomitsuki

Kisenosato

[tr][th=1]

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I hope nobody's too shocked that Kisenosato's run of "mediocre" 8-7's and 7-8 actually improved his rating by almost 150 points...

Not in the slightest - as long as it didn't take him beyond "Kotomitsuki-level". (Clapping wildly...)

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Well 2007 will not be looked back on quite as fondly as 2006 was.

Where 2006 had 6 consecutive KK's, contrastingly 4 of the 5 basho completed so far in 2007 have ended in MK. He has, however, looked very decent in Kyushu and as I post he is 3-3 from M2 having beaten 2 not-so-genki-Ozeki and M4 Toyonoshima.

He is still bulkier than your average rikishi and consequently more powerful going forward, but seems to suffer from tactical indecisiveness at critical times in a bout, where a more switched-on rikishi will seize the moment and turn the tables on him. Kisenosato gets himself into winning positions and needs to convert more of them into actual wins.

I think his education has progressed nicely this year even if he hasn't managed to put an ozeki run together. There is no rikishi higher in the banzuke that is younger than him so he's still ahead of the game in that respect. But there are very promising rikishi 'loitering with intent' just behind him in the banzuke (Goeido, Baruto & Wakanoho @ only 19).

His one KK so far this year has at least proven that he is now too good for mid-maegashira, posting an 11-4 @ M6 after going 6-9 from M3. He is now an established (almost part of the furniture) yoyo sanyaku/M1 rikishi and at only 21 years of age he has plenty of time to improve. Unlike Jakusotsu, I would be surprised if we never saw an Ozeki Kisenosato.

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He is still bulkier than your average rikishi and consequently more powerful going forward, but seems to suffer from tactical indecisiveness at critical times in a bout, where a more switched-on rikishi will seize the moment and turn the tables on him. Kisenosato gets himself into winning positions and needs to convert more of them into actual wins.

This is probably the most critical point about Kisenosato. In some posts there were a discussion concerning Kisenosato and Kotomitsuki, which now can appear to be senseless as Kotomitsuki is maintaining as a solid ozeki and Kisesonato is having some trouble to be a upper Maegashira rikishi. But it can still be useful. Giving a simplified example;

Kotomitsuki enter a bout with a tactic (go for the mawashi, e.g) but if his aite's head is low he changes the grip and tries a hatakikomi or alike to capitalize, whereas Kisenosato goes straight sans changing his sumo even if the aite shows a weak spot and gives him a good opportunity to win out. Therefore, Kisenosato can have balanced bouts with top rikishi but they are more likely to win through.

Edited by higginbotham

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Kisenosato has had progress and continues to have that but he also has bad habits on the dohyo and is a rikishi against whom tactical cleverness can work too well sometimes. He is physically strong and has good sumo sense but opens up too much. He rarely has true flow in his sumo like many other capable rikishi like Tokitenku, Ama, Shogun, Goeido etc. He needs to force it too much still.

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Maybe I'm out to lunch here, but...anybody else think that Kisenosato will end up at Kaio dimensions (i.e. ~175 kg rather than his current 155-160) before too long? I've been wondering whether that would be conducive to his sumo or not...

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Although Kisenosato is heavy and powerful, he is still agile. If he puts 10 or 15 kg. on, for example, he will perhaps become as injury-prone as Kaio and more vulnerable to light and fast Rikishi. To keep his agility and develop his sumo he should rather work on his technique but not gain weight.

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Asashosakari, given Kisenosato's age, I would say it is a fair bet that he will end up that size. Whether it is a good thing or a bad thing for him, I would tend to say extra bulk would benefit him, given that he already relies on 'power' sumo. He doesn't tend to rely on agility much, so losing a bit wouldn't affect him. Some extra forward momentum, on the other hand, might be just the ticket !

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given Kisenosato's age, I would say it is a fair bet that he will end up that size.

The "given his age" qualifier is important there, though...I didn't mean that he'll get to that weight by the time he's reaching his zenith (age ~28, to throw out the usual number), but that he looks to me like he might get there very soon, i.e. within the next couple or three years. That would make him more Miyabiyama than Kaio as far as the specific age/weight combination goes...with all the attendant potential long-term problems of carrying that much weight early on, which is part of why I'm wondering about this.

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I don't know. It's up to him really. I'd imagine a rikishi can choose whether to put on 10lbs or 40lbs and pick a regime to suit. I'd also imagine his oyakata knows the best thing for him given his sumo style. I think heavier is good for him, and he is already pretty heavy. I think he should wait until later to get to the kind of Miyabiyama weights (if ever), and concentrate on his decision making and general tactical fine tuning for now. He's back knocking on the sanyaku door for Hatsu at only 21 years of age so he doesn't need to make drastic changes.

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